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DLP 4th generation vs LCD

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January 4, 2005 11:27:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I'm looking to spend about $4,000 on a 50 to 60 inch HDTV.
I've been reading the pros and cons on DLP vs LCD technologies.
And each store sales clerk seems to have their own opinion.

I like the look of the new Sony 60" LCD at Sears.
But I also understand Samsung's new 4th generation DLP technology
should give superior picture with reduced maintance cost. i.e. the
bulbs can be replaced easily by the average homeowner.
Any comments & advice would be appreciated.

More about : dlp 4th generation lcd

Anonymous
January 5, 2005 3:19:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Steve" <shedges1@cinci.rr.com> wrote in message
news:1104899248.126340.291990@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> I'm looking to spend about $4,000 on a 50 to 60 inch HDTV.
> I've been reading the pros and cons on DLP vs LCD technologies.
> And each store sales clerk seems to have their own opinion.
>
> I like the look of the new Sony 60" LCD at Sears.
> But I also understand Samsung's new 4th generation DLP technology
> should give superior picture with reduced maintance cost. i.e. the
> bulbs can be replaced easily by the average homeowner.
> Any comments & advice would be appreciated.

Ease of bulb replacement has nothing to do with whether a tv
uses DLP or LCD technology.

Don
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 9:26:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Highly Suggest you look into the reliability of both manufacturer's products
before dropping your green stamps. Each has very nice and effective
advertising of their merits, however both have had issues regarding service.
One IS far worse than the other!! FYI, Do your Home Work!!
"Don K" <dk@dont_bother_me.com> wrote in message
news:1qudnXtbL5on5UbcRVn-gg@comcast.com...
> "Steve" <shedges1@cinci.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:1104899248.126340.291990@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>> I'm looking to spend about $4,000 on a 50 to 60 inch HDTV.
>> I've been reading the pros and cons on DLP vs LCD technologies.
>> And each store sales clerk seems to have their own opinion.
>>
>> I like the look of the new Sony 60" LCD at Sears.
>> But I also understand Samsung's new 4th generation DLP technology
>> should give superior picture with reduced maintance cost. i.e. the
>> bulbs can be replaced easily by the average homeowner.
>> Any comments & advice would be appreciated.
>
> Ease of bulb replacement has nothing to do with whether a tv
> uses DLP or LCD technology.
>
> Don
>
>
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Anonymous
January 5, 2005 11:01:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Art wrote:
> ... One IS far worse than the other!! FYI, Do your
> Home Work!!

Can you share your info with us?

--
Good luck and good sailing.
s/v Kerry Deare of Barnegat
http://kerrydeare.home.comcast.net/
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 11:46:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

If you're looking to put this hoss in a dedicated home theater room, take a
look at the DLP-based Mitsubishi HC900U projector. I mated one with a
Da-Lite "C" 106" (diag, actual viewing screen 52"x92") High Power screen.
Total outlay was about $3,000 and the picture is glorious. I would dare say
I get a better picture out of that setup than my 58" Pioneer Elite HDTV
widescreen I had to sell (moved).

The downside to this is you *really* need a dedicated light-controlled room
for this. If you can swing that, though, it's a much better deal than the
traditional LCD/DLP RPTVs.

"Steve" <shedges1@cinci.rr.com> wrote in message
news:1104899248.126340.291990@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> I'm looking to spend about $4,000 on a 50 to 60 inch HDTV.
> I've been reading the pros and cons on DLP vs LCD technologies.
> And each store sales clerk seems to have their own opinion.
>
> I like the look of the new Sony 60" LCD at Sears.
> But I also understand Samsung's new 4th generation DLP technology
> should give superior picture with reduced maintance cost. i.e. the
> bulbs can be replaced easily by the average homeowner.
> Any comments & advice would be appreciated.
>
January 5, 2005 11:48:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Armond Perretta" <newsgroupreader@REMOVEcomcast.net> wrote in message
news:mJudnRtkU8mNeEbcRVn-tw@comcast.com...
> Art wrote:
>> ... One IS far worse than the other!! FYI, Do your
>> Home Work!!
>
> Can you share your info with us?
>
> --
> Good luck and good sailing.
> s/v Kerry Deare of Barnegat
> http://kerrydeare.home.comcast.net/
>

I have recently lined up several 50 inch sets, one of the 3rd gen DLP chip,
one of the 4th gen, a Sony LCD rear projector and a Plasma, and a JVC new
chip set rear projection. A 42 inch LCD direct display was also used. All
were sets with good reputations. Properly setup all gave good pictures of
HDTV material. Each had strong points. The difference was smaller than you
might think (not price mind you). The best picture, IMO, was on the adjacent
34 inch XBR Sony tube set.

I am waiting for next year's sets with 1080p native displays and latest
generation tuners, and (cross fingers) lower prices.

Richard.
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 2:17:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

You didn't say what use you will make of the TV eg; dedicated theater, regular TV viewing, light control etc... so it is hard to give useful opinion. However here is my 2 cents;
1. Ease of bulb changing is marketing hype. If you need to change it often enough that ease is important, you picked the wrong technology for your needs. I wonder how many bought RPDLP sets over the holidays for regular home viewing of TV and didn't realize that bulbs, which typically last 2-3000 hrs, will need to be replaced every year at a cost of $400.(assuming a typical home with kids and TV on 6-8hrs /day)

2. If you want a larger size, why not spend half that money and buy a front projector (DLP or LCD) and project a 60" picture on a white wall where the RPTV would have been.....until you inevidibly find that 60" is too small and "discover" a wall where you can zoom out and enjoy an 8' picture.(and really impress the neighbors!)
Also you will now have a 6 pound device to bring in for repair or to move rather than a gorilla size box.

I won't comment on DLP vs LCD other than guess that for 95% of the non-audio/videophile population either will display a very, very acceptable picture. Note, most of the wow factor in the store has nothing to do with the set technology but is 90% due to the source material e.g. HD demo tape or hyped-up animated DVD feed. Just do some homework on rainbows, screendoor, burn-in, ambient light, viewing angle, etc. Its the user's application and response thats important, not the technology (reliability excepted). And 1st generation DLP/LCD blew people away....4th generation, duhh?

In my situation (not dedicated theater, some ambient light, mainly HD and SDTV with some DVD viewing, average techno-nut), I opted for a front projector (DLP about $2000, 2000 lumens so very bright) which I project on a white wall as a 10' wide pic. Gives stunning pic especially HD from sat receiver. Use it about 3-4 hours per day. To prolong bulb life, for the other 3-4 hours of TV viewing, I use a 32" tube non-HDTV I bought for $400. Who needs HD or widescreen for early evening and daytime browsing anyway?

Comments not directed at you, especially if you are a videophile. It just tics me off to see all the money spent on big ugly pieces of furniture (RPTV's) as opposed to alternatives just so manufactururs can rake in $4k vs $2k.
P.S. I have a 45" gorilla size RPTV (CRT) in my bedroom. Broke 3 yrs ago. Haven't found the muscle to haul it in for repair and live in boonies so home service not affordable. Solution a $150 27" sits on top.

"Steve" <shedges1@cinci.rr.com> wrote in message news:1104899248.126340.291990@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> I'm looking to spend about $4,000 on a 50 to 60 inch HDTV.
> I've been reading the pros and cons on DLP vs LCD technologies.
> And each store sales clerk seems to have their own opinion.
>
> I like the look of the new Sony 60" LCD at Sears.
> But I also understand Samsung's new 4th generation DLP technology
> should give superior picture with reduced maintance cost. i.e. the
> bulbs can be replaced easily by the average homeowner.
> Any comments & advice would be appreciated.
>
January 5, 2005 3:43:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Treetops" <treetops@000.com> wrote in message
news:342i5aF47m6uqU1@individual.net...
"Also you will now have a 6 pound device to bring in for repair or to move
rather than a gorilla size box."

You said it. This was one reason (of several) I went with the Mits
projector instead of another RPTV. It took 4 guys and a Ford Ranger to move
my 300 pound Pioneer to the buyer's home.

When I bought it, I told myself that I'd have it 10 years and eventually
would just give it away to some kid and his friends who'd take it away.
However, you then find a great deal on a house, and before you know it
you're lugging this monstrosity up a flight of stairs with some rope, a
sheet of plywood, and a whole lot of muscle.

To be fair the newer LCDs/DLPs are a LOT lighter than the old-school RPTVs
like my Pioneer (I helped a friend get his 50" Panasonic LCD into his place
over a lunch hour, it was so light I could have used just one hand on my
end!), but considering how far projection technology has come, if you have
the room for it it's the only way to go. The picture is awesome and a LOT
bigger than is financially reasonable with a RPTV/Plasma.
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 7:59:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

What model front projector DLP do you have?

Treetops wrote:
> You didn't say what use you will make of the TV eg; dedicated theater, regular TV viewing, light control etc... so it is hard to give useful opinion. However here is my 2 cents;
> 1. Ease of bulb changing is marketing hype. If you need to change it often enough that ease is important, you picked the wrong technology for your needs. I wonder how many bought RPDLP sets over the holidays for regular home viewing of TV and didn't realize that bulbs, which typically last 2-3000 hrs, will need to be replaced every year at a cost of $400.(assuming a typical home with kids and TV on 6-8hrs /day)
>
> 2. If you want a larger size, why not spend half that money and buy a front projector (DLP or LCD) and project a 60" picture on a white wall where the RPTV would have been.....until you inevidibly find that 60" is too small and "discover" a wall where you can zoom out and enjoy an 8' picture.(and really impress the neighbors!)
> Also you will now have a 6 pound device to bring in for repair or to move rather than a gorilla size box.
>
> I won't comment on DLP vs LCD other than guess that for 95% of the non-audio/videophile population either will display a very, very acceptable picture. Note, most of the wow factor in the store has nothing to do with the set technology but is 90% due to the source material e.g. HD demo tape or hyped-up animated DVD feed. Just do some homework on rainbows, screendoor, burn-in, ambient light, viewing angle, etc. Its the user's application and response thats important, not the technology (reliability excepted). And 1st generation DLP/LCD blew people away....4th generation, duhh?
>
> In my situation (not dedicated theater, some ambient light, mainly HD and SDTV with some DVD viewing, average techno-nut), I opted for a front projector (DLP about $2000, 2000 lumens so very bright) which I project on a white wall as a 10' wide pic. Gives stunning pic especially HD from sat receiver. Use it about 3-4 hours per day. To prolong bulb life, for the other 3-4 hours of TV viewing, I use a 32" tube non-HDTV I bought for $400. Who needs HD or widescreen for early evening and daytime browsing anyway?
>
> Comments not directed at you, especially if you are a videophile. It just tics me off to see all the money spent on big ugly pieces of furniture (RPTV's) as opposed to alternatives just so manufactururs can rake in $4k vs $2k.
> P.S. I have a 45" gorilla size RPTV (CRT) in my bedroom. Broke 3 yrs ago. Haven't found the muscle to haul it in for repair and live in boonies so home service not affordable. Solution a $150 27" sits on top.
>
> "Steve" <shedges1@cinci.rr.com> wrote in message news:1104899248.126340.291990@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>
>>I'm looking to spend about $4,000 on a 50 to 60 inch HDTV.
>>I've been reading the pros and cons on DLP vs LCD technologies.
>>And each store sales clerk seems to have their own opinion.
>>
>>I like the look of the new Sony 60" LCD at Sears.
>>But I also understand Samsung's new 4th generation DLP technology
>>should give superior picture with reduced maintance cost. i.e. the
>>bulbs can be replaced easily by the average homeowner.
>>Any comments & advice would be appreciated.
>>
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 7:59:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

DLP projector is an NEC 240K; 2000 lumens, 2000:1 contrast, 1024x768 native resolution, extremely tweakable if desired, lots of features including PC access via USB or PC card. Had it for about 1 year; no hiccups.

"Bob Miller" <robmx@earthlink.net> wrote in message news:41DC1DD3.3030205@earthlink.net...
> What model front projector DLP do you have?
>
> Treetops wrote:
> > You didn't say what use you will make of the TV eg; dedicated theater, regular TV viewing, light control etc... so it is hard to give useful opinion. However here is my 2 cents;
> > 1. Ease of bulb changing is marketing hype. If you need to change it often enough that ease is important, you picked the wrong technology for your needs. I wonder how many bought RPDLP sets over the holidays for regular home viewing of TV and didn't realize that bulbs, which typically last 2-3000 hrs, will need to be replaced every year at a cost of $400.(assuming a typical home with kids and TV on 6-8hrs /day)
> >
> > 2. If you want a larger size, why not spend half that money and buy a front projector (DLP or LCD) and project a 60" picture on a white wall where the RPTV would have been.....until you inevidibly find that 60" is too small and "discover" a wall where you can zoom out and enjoy an 8' picture.(and really impress the neighbors!)
> > Also you will now have a 6 pound device to bring in for repair or to move rather than a gorilla size box.
> >
> > I won't comment on DLP vs LCD other than guess that for 95% of the non-audio/videophile population either will display a very, very acceptable picture. Note, most of the wow factor in the store has nothing to do with the set technology but is 90% due to the source material e.g. HD demo tape or hyped-up animated DVD feed. Just do some homework on rainbows, screendoor, burn-in, ambient light, viewing angle, etc. Its the user's application and response thats important, not the technology (reliability excepted). And 1st generation DLP/LCD blew people away....4th generation, duhh?
> >
> > In my situation (not dedicated theater, some ambient light, mainly HD and SDTV with some DVD viewing, average techno-nut), I opted for a front projector (DLP about $2000, 2000 lumens so very bright) which I project on a white wall as a 10' wide pic. Gives stunning pic especially HD from sat receiver. Use it about 3-4 hours per day. To prolong bulb life, for the other 3-4 hours of TV viewing, I use a 32" tube non-HDTV I bought for $400. Who needs HD or widescreen for early evening and daytime browsing anyway?
> >
> > Comments not directed at you, especially if you are a videophile. It just tics me off to see all the money spent on big ugly pieces of furniture (RPTV's) as opposed to alternatives just so manufactururs can rake in $4k vs $2k.
> > P.S. I have a 45" gorilla size RPTV (CRT) in my bedroom. Broke 3 yrs ago. Haven't found the muscle to haul it in for repair and live in boonies so home service not affordable. Solution a $150 27" sits on top.
> >
> > "Steve" <shedges1@cinci.rr.com> wrote in message news:1104899248.126340.291990@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> >
> >>I'm looking to spend about $4,000 on a 50 to 60 inch HDTV.
> >>I've been reading the pros and cons on DLP vs LCD technologies.
> >>And each store sales clerk seems to have their own opinion.
> >>
> >>I like the look of the new Sony 60" LCD at Sears.
> >>But I also understand Samsung's new 4th generation DLP technology
> >>should give superior picture with reduced maintance cost. i.e. the
> >>bulbs can be replaced easily by the average homeowner.
> >>Any comments & advice would be appreciated.
> >>
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 3:54:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 5 Jan 2005 08:48:40 -0500, "Richard" <rfeirste at
nycap.rr.com> wrote:

>I have recently lined up several 50 inch sets, one of the 3rd gen DLP chip,
>one of the 4th gen, a Sony LCD rear projector and a Plasma, and a JVC new
>chip set rear projection. A 42 inch LCD direct display was also used. All
>were sets with good reputations. Properly setup all gave good pictures of
>HDTV material. Each had strong points. The difference was smaller than you
>might think (not price mind you). The best picture, IMO, was on the adjacent
>34 inch XBR Sony tube set.
>
>I am waiting for next year's sets with 1080p native displays and latest
>generation tuners, and (cross fingers) lower prices.
>
>Richard.

Your opinion was right. I own that same Sony KD-34XBR960 set. I never
could find one on display but after seeing it in my home I can
understand why.
The colors, picture detail with HDTV or DVD is fantastic. I read many
reviews where this set really stood out.
I bought mine from sonystyle.com for $2199. I'm not sure if they
still offer the free shipping. I believe the XBR chassis is Sony's
best.
I'm saving for a few years and may try to buy another set. Possibly a
42" or 46" screen with this same quality of picture.

hdtvfan
January 6, 2005 12:26:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Fred Bloggs" <SPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:jHYCd.32$t54.63@news.oracle.com...
> Is it possible to watch a front projector in a lighted room? In the stores
> they are always shown in the dark - which gets a M(me)AF of 1 and a WAF of
> way less than that!

Well, not a fully lighted room, no. In fact daylight is the death of front
projectors; when I watch mine I have some ambient light from the next room
over that doesn't interfere. However, I do have a light cannon of a
projector (Mits HC900U), and a High Power Da-Lite screen which has a decent
amount of gain. I do use "low power" mode with the Mits, however, the
"normal" mode has a fan level that is just way too loud (and the bulb will
last me 4000 hours vs. 2000). I find the high power screen more than makes
up for any contrast loss from running it in this mode.
January 6, 2005 7:53:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Knowing that there would be times that a fp would not be usable
immediately removes it from my consideration. I don't want the amount
of sun outside to be able to dictate weather or not I can use the
system. I bought mine to use - when I wanted to.

If I had a completely enclosed room with no windows, and sufficiently
large enough, I'd also be interested in a fp.

As it is, I bought a Toshiba 46HM94 DLP. To be honest, it really looks
wonderful. I compared it to a number of other units, and really thought
that the contract, viewing angles, and depths of black were great. I
can tell you also that (though it's only a 46" - that's the size I was
specifically looking for regardless of price) I can easily move it my
minivan, etc. If I planned to transport it frequently, I would be far
more concerned. But, it's not a laptop.

As an aside, I found very little difference between DLP and RP-LCD
units. I liked the idea of not worrying at all about burn-in.


--
wmhjr
------------------------------------------------------------------------
This message was posted via http://www.satelliteguys.us by wmhjr
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 9:45:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I still love my Samsung 32" HDTV monitor with a 16x9 picture tube...going on
3 years with
no problems!
January 7, 2005 2:04:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Somewhere around Thu, 06 Jan 2005 18:45:58 GMT, while reading
alt.tv.tech.hdtv, I think I thought I saw this post from "Frank Provasek"
<frank@frankcoins.com>:

>I still love my Samsung 32" HDTV monitor with a 16x9 picture tube...going on
>3 years with
>no problems!
>
As for picture quality, most people agree that crt direct-view is the best.
But when my crt tv suddenly went south a couple of months ago, I could not
bring myself to buy another heavy, big crt set. Possibly a used one real
cheap, but it's still big and hard to move unless it's a small one.

I first looked at LCDs, but decided they were too expensive, as were plasma.
A good friend who has been in the film industry for a good while and really
knows more about the field than most recommended DLP RP, and after some
investigation, that's what I got. I'm very happy with it, and it's much
better than the cheap Mitsubishi CRT I had for 10 years or so. Is it the
best? I don't really care, almost all the modern TVs are good enough to me,
especially for any current source material.

--
Marty - mjf at leftcoast-usa.com
"Those are my principles, and if you don't like them...
well, I have others." - Groucho Marx
Anonymous
January 12, 2005 2:44:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

What do you mean with LCD doesn't have this expense? They use the same type
of expensive lamp as DLP.

"Treetops" <treetops@000.com> wrote in message
news:343c4lF424v6pU1@individual.net...
Won't burn a DLP bulb at 20cents per hour to watch pap. (Of course LCD
doesn't have that expense but IMO I don't find an LCD FP as good as a DLP FP
at the size I project. But thats a whole other debate).
!