Your operating system "market shares" at home

Out of curiousity, I want to see the OS market share of your computers at home :). Just for fun!

Computers: 7

Operating systems:

Windows 7: 36%
Ultimate 21%
Home Pre 14%

Linux: 57%
Fedora 42%
Ubuntu 14%

BSD like 7%
Mac OS X 7%

Lenovo s10e - Fedora 15
Lenovo x120e - Windows 7 Home Pre.
HP dv9000 - Ubuntu 11.04
ASUS 1001p - Fedora 16
Macbook 2,1 Black - Windows 7 Ultimate/ Mac OS X 10.6
Desktop "Katyr" - Fedora 16
Desktop "Redemption" - Windows 7 Ultimate
30 answers Last reply
More about your operating system market shares home
  1. Shared house in which I live is 40% Mac, 60% Windows.

    PC:
    2 x XP
    1 X Vista 64

    Mac:
    G4 - Musician
    Macbook Pro - Photographer
  2. No Linux? Lol.
  3. Not counting the old PCs or the VMs, my household has:

    1 PPC Mac mini running Tiger
    1 i7 Mac Mini server running Lion Server
    2 Vista laptops
    1 PC running FreeBSD
    1 PC quad booting Windows 7, Windows 8, Fedora 15, and LFS

    In additon I have a number of NAS appliances running Linux - let's not go there - and an iPad.
  4. 1 PC - WIn7
    3 laptops - ubuntu
    1 laptop XP
    1 hp microserver - FreeBSD
    1 readynas - embedded linux
    1 htpc - ubuntu/xbmc
    2 supermicro servers - linux/KVM
  5. amdfangirl said:
    No Linux? Lol.


    The closest thing I have is a disused Android mobile that I've dumped in favour of a £10 dumb phone. I've really lost that urge to play with tech in the last few years. I really should get a one of these projects I keep talking about going.
  6. Server: Debian squeeze
    Laptop: Mint 10
    Desktop: Gentoo (w/ 3.2 kernel, updated fairly regularly)
    SGI O2: Debian squeeze
    DEC AlphaStation 500: Debian squeeze
    NeXTSTATION Turbo: NeXTSTEP
    HP Touchpad: WebOS
    Nokia N900: Maemo 5 (debian-based)
    NetGear WNDR3700, Asus RT-N12, Cisco E3000: OpenWRT
    DLink DSC932L: some stripped-down 2.6 Linux from DLink
  7. Has anybody ever called you a GEEK? ;)

    I'm almost disappointed you're not running OpenVMS on the AlphaStation for the full retro experience, I could just see you trying to port DecNet to to WebOS and Maemo and turning it into the media server to blow most geeks into the industrial revolution. I spent a good year playing with the 2100's and the Alpha ports of NT 3.5(1) back in the day, lovely bit of kit, all be it a bit on the expensive side.

    I'm so glad I've gotten over my HW phase...
  8. Heh. I'm very impressed.
  9. audiovoodoo said:
    Has anybody ever called you a GEEK? ;)

    I'm almost disappointed you're not running OpenVMS on the AlphaStation for the full retro experience, I could just see you trying to port DecNet to to WebOS and Maemo and turning it into the media server to blow most geeks into the industrial revolution. I spent a good year playing with the 2100's and the Alpha ports of NT 3.5(1) back in the day, lovely bit of kit, all be it a bit on the expensive side.

    I'm so glad I've gotten over my HW phase...

    I do plan on attempting to netboot the O2 and do a network installation of IRIX, just haven't had enough "bored" time.

    And, yes, at some point I will likely donate these, the local Goodwill actually has a pretty sweet "History of Computing" museum.
  10. I've got a real soft spot for SGI, they once helped me land a nice placement year. I walked into the Interview and spotted a newly installed Indy playing an OpenGL demo, took one look, pointed and just blurted out 'Cool Indy, can I play with it?' My boss later admitted that it was this rather than the 45 minutes of BS that followed it that convinced him I was what he was looking for :)

    I still remember when we took delivery of the two 16 proc power challenge machines in the data centre on that placement year. We had some nice kit (mostly Alpha clusters and a bit of Sun) but those things just had presence... hard not to when you're 10ft tall, purple and have enough subdued design to justify inclusion in a design museum. People think Apple nailed industrial design, I think SGI did it at least a decade earlier.
  11. Agree completely. Their designs still look awesome, timeless, really.
  12. They kinda look tacky. :?
  13. I refuse to listen to an Australian on any matter concerning good taste. Especially one who is to young to remember just how bad industrial design was in the 80's and 90's. [/Old man rant]

    Compare a VAX box:



    To a power challenge box:



    Frankly SGI were the only people other than Sun that knew a colour other than battleship grey existed.
  14. Oh yeah? Why do you suppose that IBM are called Big Blue? They were using blue as the colour for their hardware long before SGI were a twinkle in anyone's eye.
  15. True enough, but that HW was from the 60's & 70's. In the 80's and 90's IBM went black for a lot of the kit in that 2001 monolith style. It was the very late 90's before they really picked up on the blue theme again.

    I guess I'm a little bias to the periods in which I cut my teeth in IT. To that end I'll always be a sucker for Sun and SGI HW. DEC / Digital kit always seemed stuffy and business (although I did like the keyboards, very IBM) and the PC HW of the time was so darn dull that walking into an office with a stack of Sparc stations or a visualisation lab full of SGI HW really was a treat.
  16. Windows:

    HP AMD 64 Athlon x2: Windows Vista (I like Vista =x)
    Sony VAIO Intel Centrino: Windows Vista

    Linux:

    HP DV-4: Zorin OS (Ubuntu 11.0.4?)


    I've been using this Zorin OS for 2 days and I'm loving it! Sure, it was a pain to figure out how to get the Wi-Fi up and running but it's great once you figure it out. I can't even remember how I did it LMAO
  17. Don't worry, I have a friend who believes Vista is better than 7!

    To be honest, Vista after a few SPs was just fine.
  18. 1 Desktop Linux. Goes between Debian squeeze, Fedora 14,15. The Laptop I used to own before it had an unfortunate run in with the road from a top a moving vehicle was between Jolicloud, Fedora 15, and Ubuntu. The new laptop I may get will have 7 on it for hardware compatibility.
  19. 5 desktops

    4 have Win 7 Pro

    1 has a dual boot with the latest version of Ubuntu and Win 7 Pro, my first time using Linux outside of a VM and I honestly use it more than any of my Win 7 desktops.
  20. Currently a bit of a mish-mash. Lots of VM's, not a lot of hardware :D I'm waiting for a couple small things to arrive in order to get my new virtualization server running, so I'll update once that's good. Right now...

    1 Laptop
    -------------------------
    Windows 7
    (Mint Debian VM for homework/development)

    1 Virt Server
    -------------------------
    OpenIndiana (FileServer)
    Debian Squeeze (Web Server/Dev)
    Mint Debian (Dev)
    Ubuntu (Media Server)

    Nearly all of this is being replaced with alternative distributions, and more is being added as well! :D I'm a fan of Debian if you haven't noticed ;)
  21. My VMs:

    (For general interest and Stray OS)

    6 Fedora VMs :
    1 Fedora Core 3
    1 Fedora 14
    1 Fedora 15
    1 Fedora 16
    2 Fedora 17

    1 Gentoo
    1 Scientific Linux
    1 Mageia
    1 Live CD tester
    1 Distro tester
    1 Linux Mint Debian

    Where was the OS bias?
  22. Don't get me started on VMs. Apart from the usual Windows and Linux stuff

    OpenBSD
    Solaris (and Solaris Express)
    GNU Hurd
    QNX

    And, no doubt, some others lurking there that I have forgotten.
  23. Ijack said:
    Don't get me started on VMs. Apart from the usual Windows and Linux stuff


    I have many more than I listed, I just mentioned the ones that get used :D
  24. And, of course, in some of my VMs I run VMs ....
  25. Ijack said:
    And, of course, in some of my VMs I run VMs ....


    Yo dawg, heard you like VM's...
  26. Very Much
  27. Ijack said:
    And, of course, in some of my VMs I run VMs ....

    Very Inception-esque. Apparently, last year when I had a pretty bad wreck (during recovery time, I had a lot of idle time, hence my reappearance) I would veer wildly from normal conversation to deeply technical discussions with no real prompting nor transition while I was on "the good stuff"TM. Such a topic was apparently a discussion I held with a few people, discussing the possibilities that two layers of hardware abstraction could serve, security implications, and other nonsense
  28. bmouring said:
    Very Inception-esque


    Unlike Inception, VMs inside VMs tend to go slower, not faster ;).
  29. A little slower (or in the case of SimAMD a lot slower) but invaluable when testing a home-brew OS developed using Linux tools on a Mac. Easier to run the Linux in a VM, rather than dual-booting, and then run a VM in Linux to debug the OS.

    If anyone is interested in low-level stuff using the x86_64, SimAMD is an excellent debugging tool.
  30. I'm very tempted to get an upgrade to 16GB (or 32GB) of RAM to run all my VMs.
Ask a new question

Read More

Windows 7 Computers Fedora