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Windows XP Activation??

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December 13, 2008 2:44:54 PM

Hi

I understand retail sales of Windows XP ceased on 30 June 2008, although it is said that it is still possible to obtain Windows XP from system builders until 31 July 2009. What would be the case if i were to purchase WXP from a system builder before 31 July 2009 but didn't install the XP-OS on my new system untill after 31 July 2009, due to still customizing my PC. would Microsoft still allow activation of the OS after this date?


Cheers
Musicmad

More about : windows activation

December 13, 2008 2:49:19 PM

Windows XP will activate, but MS will provide no further support for the OS. No more updates. The evolution of XP stops there.
December 13, 2008 10:44:34 PM

badge said:
Windows XP will activate, but MS will provide no further support for the OS. No more updates. The evolution of XP stops there.



Does that mean my system will be at risk without these updates? What exactly are the benefits of receiving updates from MS?
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December 14, 2008 11:55:17 AM

MS provides automatic updates the second Tuesday of each month currently. With XP, those monthly updates will cease July 2009. XP wiill receive no further Service packs which are basically major fixes for a contemporary operating system. So XP will no longer be 'contemorary. The evolution of Windows XP will have expired. The system will become weak and eventually completely outdated.

http://www.microsoft.com/protect/computer/updates/bulle...
December 14, 2008 2:55:57 PM

With the extremely large base, (especially businessess), of XP systems running out there, I can almost guarantee that Microsoft will not stop putting out security updates at just about the same rate they do now. There may not be any more service packs, but security updates will continue for quite a while yet.

I work for a company owned by Honeywell. They have over 130,000 employees, most of whom have at least one computer. I have two company issued computers. One on my desk which was just bought less than a year ago, and a new laptop they just bought. All of their computers have XP Pro installed.

They wouldn't be doing that if they thought that security support was going to stop in the middle of 2009. Most other businesses we deal with are doing the same thing. Very few are using Vista. Vendors sell the computers to companies, and they pay a fee to have the OS 'downgraded', as they put it, to XP.

We've got quite a few PLC's that run machines and pilot plants, and most of those have Windows 2000 or Windows NT on them. In fact, most of the PLC's that we buy still use Pentium III's! You don't need all that much computing power to run a machine.

I have Vista here at home as well as XP. SP1 solved many of the Vista issues. It's really not a problematic OS anymore. The only reason I've still got XP installed at home, (I've got a dual-boot system), is that my wife still won't try Vista.

If I were buying today, I'd get Vista. I buy the OEM versions and install them myself. I've got Vista Ultimate 64 here at home.
December 14, 2008 3:12:29 PM

Yeah, it's true MS will continue to address some major security isues in the future, but I'm sure it will not be long any updates released to windows XP will be few and far between. By say, July 1, 2011 I would think XP update releases would appear maybe once or twice a year. I own my own company and currently have five Vista machines and some ten other XP machines we use in our small busines. I will eventually convert whatever machines I can hardware wise to Vista. When I get the energy to do all the backup and reinstall that is. 8)
December 15, 2008 12:38:25 AM

With large companies, educating as many as 100,000 or more employeeson a new computer OS is going to be a huge task!

I work at a research center of a company that Honeywell bought a couple of years ago. We're still working out details of integrating our computer systems, even all of Honeywell, as far as I know, is still using XP.

Most of the employees at my company are either chemical or mechanical engineers or chemists. Approx. half the staff at the research center have Phd's in either chemistry or engineering. Just getting this large group of very well educated people to follow instructions to reboot when a security upgrade is pushed out from IT can be a pain. For people who probably have an average IQ of around 140, you wouldn't believe some of the really dumb things they do with computers.

Switching all of them over to Vista is going to take much longer than MS would like, or will admit to. XP works and does pretty much whatever we need it to do.

I'd almost be willing to bet that many large companies will skip Vista completely and go right to Windows 7, even though I've read that that is just a rewrite of Vista to fix some of the problems.

In fact, if you get below the surface, there's still a whole lot of XP code still in Vista!
December 15, 2008 4:24:21 AM

Quote:
I'd almost be willing to bet that many large companies will skip Vista completely and go right to Windows 7, even though I've read that that is just a rewrite of Vista to fix some of the problems.


Specifically what problems?

Quote:
In fact, if you get below the surface, there's still a whole lot of XP code still in Vista!


XP code in Vista? I'm not surprised, but I don't see how that makes Vista any less formidable.

A long time friend works in IT and his most recent job is with the Metropopitian Sewer District. Asked what he was doing, He said, "installing Vista for the sewer district." So, it is true XP will be around in industry for years to come. Vista is there too. There is really not much training involved to convert an employed user from XP to Vista. My wife and kid are both using Vista 64. Really, it took all but a couple of minutes for them to make the transition. Well, an hour maybe.

Have you been to the retail stores lately. Places like Best Buy, etc.

http://www.dailytech.com/People+Finally+Embrace+64bit+W...

Retailers such as Best Buy and Circuit City are also catching on to the trend, offering largely 64-bit OS-equipped machines for their most heavily advertised models. Many manufacturers are also throwing in their support; Gateway will be transitioning its entire desktop line to 64-bit in time for the back-to-school shopping season. To put this in perspective, in its first quarter, only 5 percent of Gateway's notebooks and desktops were 64-bit. In its third quarter, a whopping 95 percent of desktops will be 64-bit and 30 percent of notebooks will be.

64 bit is becoming mainstream. Imagine that.

http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=506
December 15, 2008 5:40:38 AM

Microsoft will continue churning out updates for Win XP until 2014... and was originally scheduled to stop in 2012. The reason for this was because of Vista's delayed release... not because of Vista's "slow" adoption. You will be able to activate XP for at least that long... if not longer. Though if you're still using XP after 11 or 12 years... I'd have to ask why...
December 15, 2008 6:46:26 AM

Right on 2014. My MS offfice 2000 Small Business edition received one security update this year 2008, eight or nine years since it's release. Upcoming Windows 7 will not support my 2000 Office Small Business Suite. I would bet by 2014, some of the newest software around town will not run on XP. Maybe I'm wrong. But that software would run like in dwarf time or something on XP.
December 15, 2008 8:23:30 AM

badge said:
Quote:
There is really not much training involved to convert an employed user from XP to Vista. My wife and kid are both using Vista 64. Really, it took all but a couple of minutes for them to make the transition. Well, an hour maybe.
Quote:


im gonna take a stab that youve never worked as a technician, its took us 1.5 years to get 50% of the staff where i work to use a very easy online VLE(Virtual Learning Enviroment), never underestimate the stupidity of some people. I am not looking forward to a OS upgrade, we are going to skipping Vista however and going straight for Windows 7. ive been told before that i havnt installed any programs onto a machine and therefore was an idiot, as it turned out they thought the programs were not there because the icons were not on the desktop. You cant imagine some of the things people ask about computers till you work in the industry and see just how many idiotic people there are out there when it comes to Computers.
December 15, 2008 8:50:46 AM

We have a lot of college kids working for us. Our personnell turns over from time to time due to student scheduling, moving things like that. Most of the young people (students) are pretty well versed using a computer. The girl we have at the front desk currently learned how to erase her browing history I saw the other day. None of them would know how to build a computer. Or like, 'where exactly is the hard drive located and what does it do?" I do not work in IT. Well, I am an X-ray Technician and we own a private medical practice for 20+ years, so I attend major conventions and the like and review all the new technology which covers a wide spectrum of IT. We own a lot of high tech equiptment we maintain. I know more than most of the people hired to sell say a x-ray processor or a state of the art 90K digital x-ray system. I don't know. I have used Vista since BETA 1. I first installed it on a socket A MB with a 9200 Radeon and 2 x 512 PC3200 value RAM I thought it was kock.
December 15, 2008 12:54:55 PM

Making a quick switch from XP to Vista system.

From Vista main desktop toolbar (bottom of your screen) right click on the toolbar and select 'Properties'.

Select 'Start Menu Tab'.

Select 'Classic Start menu'.

Now your desktop should appear just like Windows XP would display the desktop layout.
!