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What if I need to reinstall Vista?

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January 15, 2009 2:19:18 AM

Using Premium OEM version of Vista. So if my hard drive or video card crashes and I need to re-install the Vista OS am I going to run into some problems with MS trying to say I stole the copy or what?

Also, I'm using q9400 quad core with 4gb of ram, any problems with Vista Premium and that setup?

thanks

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January 15, 2009 4:43:55 AM

no, the oem copy is linked to the motherboard, you'll be fine
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January 15, 2009 10:41:10 AM

Ok. But what if the motherboard konks out on me too? Wouldn't proof of purchase and my personal details, like name, ph number, address, be enough to allow a reinstall?
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a b U Graphics card
January 15, 2009 11:53:23 AM

weatherphobia said:
Ok. But what if the motherboard konks out on me too? Wouldn't proof of purchase and my personal details, like name, ph number, address, be enough to allow a reinstall?



That issue is Microsofts call since its in writing at their website the OEM license is not Motherboard transferable.

I'm sure they didn't put it in writing for nothing.

Some here say they've already transfered their license to a new motherboard.

If thats true I'd say Microsofts policy appears the same as XP, with having to call in, and answer questions, but we'll see in the long run I guess.

You can always have a complete motherboard failure and an exact replacement not be available, so they'd have to make lenient provisions for that.

So its probably up to the questions, do you answer them exactly as Microsoft expects, if you do, you're in business.

Maybe we should pass out cheat sheets. LOL :sol: 


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January 15, 2009 12:26:44 PM

20+ years and some $250 Billion later and Microsoft still has to screw with legitimate customers who bought the product in good faith.


And BTW, all those'do you agree' and those documents in packages/products don't mean much in court. May hundreds of people have sued and won lawsuits because something happened to them that WAS covered in an agreement and they still did what it told them not to do.

As soon as companies spend money sending out teams of people to make people sign contract agreements in person then this will continue.

Would you honestly sign a contract ONLINE to have heart bypass surgery or have your trees cut down or fix your car?

I wouldn't :-D

If M$ screws me if I have to buy another motherboard and says I have to buy $99+ for a new license then I'll have to look into Linux.
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January 15, 2009 7:35:07 PM

i've called in to re-activate twice, and they have been pretty accommodating. I don't think the guys that field the calls care too much, they just want to ask the questions they need to ask, and issue you a re-activation code.

both times i called were legitimate cuz my mb died twice (faulty RMA mb, go figure). but they really didn't go into detail with their questions, just same questions both times
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January 15, 2009 9:37:31 PM

You're story is great [not for you but for me], I am so glad you replied with the exact example I was thinking about.


THANK YOU VERY MUCH :-) :bounce:  :D 
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a b U Graphics card
January 16, 2009 11:22:16 AM

weatherphobia said:
20+ years and some $250 Billion later and Microsoft still has to screw with legitimate customers who bought the product in good faith.



Microsofts greed and fear of software piracy, dictates their policies, but their fear and greed create the very things they're concerned about!

My personal opinion is whether OEM or not, a legal license is a legal license and should be allowed to be transfered to an upgraded system, now if it took a more advanced version of the OP/SYS to run on the new hardware they'd have legitimate claims, but if the same OP/SYS could run either machine, then only having the OP/SYS installed on one machine should be Msfts only concern.

The fact they posted anything in writing at the website doesn't mean too much, hardware fails and transferring of the OP/SYS at some point to the new hardware will have to be done, and Msft will allow it whether they like it or not, or they'll get sued and they know it.

Legally they wouldn't even attempt to back it up unless they were 100% positive they were right and could not loose in court or they'd get media massacred.

So probably what they posted at the website was a scare tactic, to get idiots like myself to buy the more expensive retail version!

So don't worry about it, enjoy what you have!


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January 17, 2009 9:20:11 PM

Quote:
Ok. But what if the motherboard konks out on me too?

Microsoft licensing terms allow the motherboard to be replaced due to reasons of failure or defect without requiring a new license. Its the only exception to OEM restrictions on transferring to a new machine. If you electively upgrade the motherboard to obtain new features or capability, you need a new license.

You can reinstall the OS as many times as you want, whether its OEM or retail does not matter, though you won't be able to activate online as much as you want. After so many activations online, you will need to call MS activation support in order to activate.
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My personal opinion is whether OEM or not, a legal license is a legal license and should be allowed to be transfered to an upgraded system...

Except when the "legal license" was purchased at a substantial discount in exchange for more limited user rights, the most substantial of which being transfer rights.

Would you prefer that Microsoft charge everyone full retail price (except for its corporate, education, and other volume license customers, of course), instead of this obviously anti-consumer practice of offering different licensing rights at different price points to serve needs or budgets of different consumers?

I see what you mean, Microsoft is totally anti-consumer there. Everyone should be forced to pay $250 for Windows so that they can transfer it as many times as they want, even though the vast majority of PC buyers do not transfer their operating system now and would not do so if they were paying $250 for Windows. Much more consumer friendly!

I'm guessing you hate the fact that cable and satellite providers have different packages at different price points to serve the needs or budgets of different consumers? There should be only one package that includes everything, and to hell with anyone who doesn't want 30 different sports channels, 30 premium movie channels, so on and so forth?

Indeed, how do you cope at all in a world that pretty much universally rejects your "one size and price for all" philosophy? I can see you getting thrown out of a lot of places...

"Excuse me, there is a problem with my bill."

"What seems to be the problem, sir?"

"You charged me $35.00 for the steak and lobster dinner."

"Yes, that is correct, you ordered the steak and lobster dinner."

"I know that. Don't you think I know what I ordered?"

"OK, so where is the problem on your bill?"

"Its $35.00! There are many things on your menu that are a lot less, like this Tuna Melt right here. That's only $7.50."

"OK, I'm not understanding what you want, sir. The Tuna Melt is $7.50, that is correct. But you didn't have that."

"Again with you telling me what I ordered. I know what I ordered. Do you think I'm stupid?"

"No, sir. I just don't understand your complaint."

"You are charging me $35.00 but that isn't the same as $7.50."

"Umm...I'm sorry, but I still don't see what the problem is?"

"Where do you come off charging me $35.00 but someone else only pays $7.50? Are you saying that for $7.50, I can have a Tuna Melt but not the steak and lobster dinner, is that right?"

"Yes, that's right."

"And you greedy bastards think that's fair?"

"Umm, sir, I'm going to ask you to leave now."
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a b U Graphics card
January 18, 2009 2:39:15 AM

tcsenter said:

Quote:
My personal opinion is whether OEM or not, a legal license is a legal license and should be allowed to be transfered to an upgraded system...

Except when the "legal license" was purchased at a substantial discount in exchange for more limited user rights, the most substantial of which being transfer rights.

Would you prefer that Microsoft charge everyone full retail price (except for its corporate, education, and other volume license customers, of course), instead of this obviously anti-consumer practice of offering different licensing rights at different price points to serve needs or budgets of different consumers?

I see what you mean, Microsoft is totally anti-consumer there. Everyone should be forced to pay $250 for Windows so that they can transfer it as many times as they want, even though the vast majority of PC buyers do not transfer their operating system now and would not do so if they were paying $250 for Windows. Much more consumer friendly!

I'm guessing you hate the fact that cable and satellite providers have different packages at different price points to serve the needs or budgets of different consumers? There should be only one package that includes everything, and to hell with anyone who doesn't want 30 different sports channels, 30 premium movie channels, so on and so forth?

Indeed, how do you cope at all in a world that pretty much universally rejects your "one size and price for all" philosophy? I can see you getting thrown out of a lot of places...

"Excuse me, there is a problem with my bill."

"What seems to be the problem, sir?"

"You charged me $35.00 for the steak and lobster dinner."

"Yes, that is correct, you ordered the steak and lobster dinner."

"I know that. Don't you think I know what I ordered?"

"OK, so where is the problem on your bill?"

"Its $35.00! There are many things on your menu that are a lot less, like this Tuna Melt right here. That's only $7.50."

"OK, I'm not understanding what you want, sir. The Tuna Melt is $7.50, that is correct. But you didn't have that."

"Again with you telling me what I ordered. I know what I ordered. Do you think I'm stupid?"

"No, sir. I just don't understand your complaint."

"You are charging me $35.00 but that isn't the same as $7.50."

"Umm...I'm sorry, but I still don't see what the problem is?"

"Where do you come off charging me $35.00 but someone else only pays $7.50? Are you saying that for $7.50, I can have a Tuna Melt but not the steak and lobster dinner, is that right?"

"Yes, that's right."

"And you greedy bastards think that's fair?"

"Umm, sir, I'm going to ask you to leave now."




This is what I said DH, you went on your rant from only part of my statement!

Quote:
My personal opinion is whether OEM or not, a legal license is a legal license and should be allowed to be transfered to an upgraded system, now if it took a more advanced version of the OP/SYS to run on the new hardware they'd have legitimate claims, but if the same OP/SYS could run either machine, then only having the OP/SYS installed on one machine should be Msfts only concern.
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January 18, 2009 2:13:47 PM

Quote:
This is what I said DH, you went on your rant from only part of my statement!

I read your entire statement before and replied to the entire statement. Microsoft sells the OEM product at a huge discount. Do you believe someone who pays $25 for an operating system should be entitled to the same user rights as someone who pays $250? Do you believe $7.50 should buy you the same as someone who pays $35.00?

If you want a license that can be transferred to upgraded or new computers, its available to you. If you are like the other 90% of the computer buying public who has no interest in transferring an OS and just buys a new PC, there is a license for that, too, at a considerable discount.

So what's the problem, again? Oh, are you saying that you just want whatever you want at the price you want it? e.g. you want Steak and Lobster for the price of a Tuna Melt?

Yes, well, welcome to the world of adulthood where you don't get to make decisions like setting your own prices, tax rates, the number of hours in a day, when you can leave work and for what reasons, so on and so forth.

Granted, most of us come to 'grips' with this reality much sooner than it appears you will, usually around the age that you get your first paycheck and notice this thing called "taxes" being deducted (15 or 16 years old at the latest). Be that as it may, welcome to adulthood, nevertheless (better late than never, I suppose).

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a b U Graphics card
January 18, 2009 7:16:26 PM

I paid for my operating system DH, full retail version no less so I don't expect a thing for free!

Although Steak and Lobster for the price of a Tuna melt would be quite nice I have to say!

I included in my statement,"now if it took a more advanced version of the OP/SYS to run on the new hardware they'd have legitimate claims," They being Microsoft!

Try reading it again slowly, clear the cobwebs from your little mind and think it over.

Quote:
Yes, well, welcome to the world of adulthood where you don't get to make decisions like setting your own prices, tax rates, the number of hours in a day, when you can leave work and for what reasons, so on and so forth.


Actually I've had my own business for about 20yrs now, and except for the tax rates, I do all that anyway, I set the hours I work and go home when I please, and also set my prices.

Please continue with your idiotic rant, I'm beginning to get quite amused!

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January 18, 2009 9:09:27 PM

What happens is software makers start this licensing thing on a few products, some people complain but not enough to stop it. Then ALL software makers make it to where you have to call a number to be allowed to re-install software YOU PAID FOR. THEN we go to you can only install the software ONE TIME and in rare circumstances be allowed to do it more than once, telling them some part failed and needed to be replaced.

THEN you get companies saying ONE TIME install, no excuses or exceptions allowed. THEN people start to ACCEPT this as normal and have no desire to fight the practice in any way, not even willing to spend the time to write a congressman and such. THEN that's it! All software is ONE INSTALL ONLY and we all accept it and even start, hint hint, DEFENDING those companies.

So I install the retail version of the Vista. Motherboard goes bad, spent $150 for a new board now $150 more for Vista, how many THINGS in your system can go wrong before the constant Vista upgrades and permissions send you back to XP or God forbid become one of those LINUX people?

In my opinion when you buy something you should be able to use it and reuse it as much as you want to. I should be allowed to do a clean install of Vista every 3-6 months without having to e-mail, chat or calling anyone. I spent the money, I have the receipt RIGHT HERE LOOK!

Can you image buying a battery and every time work needed to be done on your car you were REQUIRED to purchase a new battery?

Or buy shoes and when you buy newer shoes you had to pay the store owner of the original shoes a fee for changing your shoes?

It's not more silly that what Microsoft is doing with Vista or even XP.

I recall hardware problems months ago and I had to re-install XP 3 times within about 3 days time. I called and got my new fancy number each time. That was unnecessary since I BOUGHT the damn software.

But guys, keep defending Microsoft. You're saving them millions in advertising and convince people that this practice is normal and you shouldn't be upset about it. Defend...go go go
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