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Error loading operating system

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Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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May 3, 2012 1:45:45 PM

This message pops up before I have a chane to click f8 or anything. But to fix this problem does this mean I just need a new os? Like if I got a Ubuntu livecd in there before this message popped up, would that work?
May 3, 2012 3:40:16 PM

I'd try sticking a LiveCD in there and seeing if it boots. You've not said if the system was previously working or not, did it used to boot and if so what was it booting? Can you get into the BIOS and check which device it's trying to boot from? Does the hard disk show up in the BIOS?
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May 4, 2012 5:15:18 AM

Wow ok I just got a big problem. Nothing is popping up on the monitor. And I know my cords are right.
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May 4, 2012 5:20:24 AM

yep that's a problem. and not with the OS. if you dont get anything on the monitor, can you try another monitor? Or try another device on this monitor? If the monitor is working you can start troubleshooting your computer. Do any lights come on and fans spin up when you turn the computer on? You can remove the cords for the CD, HD, Floppy, etc from the motherboard to try to isolate the problem. remember where you unplugged them from. remove any other devices. the only things you need for the computer to post are CPU, Ram, Video card.
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May 4, 2012 5:46:21 AM

Ok I'll try it. But isn't the hard drive important too? I'm deff sure the monitor works. I use another computer on it too. And yes all the lights, fans , and hard drives spin up. I think the problem is in the video card, but I dont know what todo. I'll post an update after I've trouble shooted like you said.
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May 4, 2012 7:42:40 AM

No, in terms of getting something displaying on the screen the HDD is not required. You can boot a PC off a PenDrive / CD with no HDD attached and still see the BIOS messages. That said if the HDD is really foobar then it can cause you issues. Disconnect the power to the HDD and try it. Then work through the standard trouble shooting steps:

Ram seated correctly
Graphics seated correctly
CPU seated correctly

It's also worth checking the monitor. Does the power light come on? Does your monitor support different inputs? Has it been switched to the other input in error??
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May 4, 2012 1:26:23 PM

No my monitor is fine. Brand new. I know it works because when this first started, it would turn on in with a 1/10 chance.
Now something happend and idk why.
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May 4, 2012 2:08:51 PM

How do I post pics?
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May 5, 2012 2:29:34 AM

I figured it out! These round circular things with exploded tops were everywhere on the motherboard. I looked into it and found out I had capacitor plague :( . Do you know the easiest way to fix this? It cheapest?
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May 5, 2012 2:49:53 AM

Unless you are already handy with a soldering iron and know a little electronics then it's time for a new motherboard.

What make / model is it? You might be able to get it replaced under warranty but that can vary depending on where you live.
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May 5, 2012 4:06:09 AM

Heck I don't even know of this still has a warranty. I watched a couple of tutorials on soldering, and have a extra computer. I was wondering, would a 1000uf capacitor be able to replace a 1500uf? Same volts too. I have a evega e241819.
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May 5, 2012 4:51:11 AM

you'll want to replace your motherboard. dont mess with it. 1) You don't know what caused the capacitor to blow and 2) you could further damage the other equipment in your computer like hard disk, cpu, etc.
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May 5, 2012 6:20:26 AM

Ok but what do I replace it with? I have no idea what to look for in replacing a motherboard.
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May 5, 2012 12:50:10 PM

If you are replacing components then you need to do like for like. There are many different grades of capacitors and gaming boards designed for overclocking where a greater power draw is required will tend to use higher quality ones. Using a 1000uf one in place of a 1500uf will make it go bang!

I've just had a quick look but can't find much on that board. It it looks like it's designed for Intel CPU's. Can you please give us a list of the components you have CPU, RAM, Graphics card and then we can point you at some options. Also what sort of budget do you have to spend on this? What do you use your computer for?
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May 5, 2012 3:33:31 PM

foshizz said:
Ok but what do I replace it with? I have no idea what to look for in replacing a motherboard.


you'll want to replace it with a motherboard with the same chipset so it will support your ram and cpu. any brand will do, just make sure it is the same form factor so it will fit in your case :) 


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May 5, 2012 8:57:04 PM

*phew* finding what my graphics card is was the hardest part. I believe it's a quadro fx 3400. I have 2 sticks of psd1g400k ram, and 2 sticks of psd1g400kh ram. I have no idea how theyre different, one the h-version just has a case. I have no way to identify my CPU, but it has an amd heatsink/fan and a 939 socket.
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May 5, 2012 11:07:46 PM

Yikes. 939? That's *old* Not made anymore, but you can probably find them to buy in the aftermarket.

However, you have no idea if any damage was done to any other components when the motherboard decided life wasn't worth living. So your machine is pretty much worth its weight to the scrap yard. I would not invest more than $25 or so into trying to bring it back to life. In terms of real-world $ value your machine is really worth nothing, since you can out and buy a new (if crappy) laptop for $250. I'd only spend as much time and money repairing it as I was willing to lose.

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May 5, 2012 11:27:58 PM

Like how old? I rubbed off the crapload of thermal paste on it and it's a amd Athalon 64 x2 4200+ Manchester.
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May 5, 2012 11:32:38 PM

Amazingly people pay good money for a Athlon 64 X2 on 939.

Sell the CPU and buy a faster newer model with shiny new stuffs :) .
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May 5, 2012 11:50:48 PM

Wow. I didn't expect this to happen. Buy a new motherboard, or new machine do you mean?
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May 5, 2012 11:58:40 PM

amdfangirl said:
Amazingly people pay good money for a Athlon 64 X2 on 939.

Sell the CPU and buy a faster newer model with shiny new stuffs :) .


Assuming the CPU didn't bite the big one when the mobo rolled over.

What's the street value of the X2? I've got some laying around we use for min-spec terribad testing.

Anyway, at best I'd part this machine out with the warning the mobo blew and the parts are in unknown condition. I don't think it's worth investing any money into saving unless it was a mission of mercy.
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May 6, 2012 12:24:38 AM

Hmm well I'm trying not to be uneccessarily wasteful with my money. If I were to replace the motherboard with another how much would that set me back?
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May 6, 2012 1:18:07 PM

You need to start looking for socket 939 motherboards. Having just had a look on google here in the UK anything from £11 to £100. Being an older standard you're looking at old stock and clearance items which might work in your favour. The problem is that if the MB went it could have also killed the CPU and Graphics; CPU's don't like having voltages and currents outside operating range put through them.

It might be worth asking a shop to see if they can test the components before you spend money on it.
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May 6, 2012 2:57:51 PM

just try replacing the motherboard. most likely that will fix your problem.
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May 6, 2012 5:10:11 PM

Alrighty then. Well the caps blew near the graphics card, and an outlet. The graphics card works still, it still spins and all, and so does the outlet. Any suggestions for brands I should look at?
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May 6, 2012 6:00:40 PM

I just searched google and found a ASUS A8NE-FM - motherboard - micro ATX - Socket 939 for $13 and it even includes shipping
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May 6, 2012 11:27:39 PM

How do I find out if it's compatible with the rest of my stuff?
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May 7, 2012 12:58:19 AM

foshizz said:
How do I find out if it's compatible with the rest of my stuff?


You'll need to hit google and try to see if you can find the tech specs/manual/QVLs for the mobo. Chances are it will all be fine. Just make sure your parts are physically going to fit. Example would be your card being PCI-E, make sure the board has a PCI-E slot, that kind of thing.

I strongly urge you to NOT invest too much money into this. $15, sure. Worth a try. But the fact still is your computer is *probably* worth more as parts then it ever will be as a whole unit, assuming those parts still work.

A new laptop starts around $250. No, it's not amazing at that price, but as the owner of a $300 Acer that's rather well traveled they can be highly serviceable. It kind of depends on your needs and what you currently work with, but I'm going to venture a $250-$300 laptop is probably at least on par with your current setup. Just to put into perspective how any money you spend repairing your old rig can quickly mount into a good portion to put towards an entirely new, sounder machine.
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May 7, 2012 6:27:26 AM

Ok I'm trying to find a new motherboard. But I'm new to the behind-the-scenes aspect of computing, so learning all the new terminology is getting difficult/exhausting :p 
Does it matter whether the new mobo I find has more/less ports n stuff?
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May 7, 2012 10:10:40 AM

you will need to physically look inside your computer. if you are currently using 2 PCI cards on your existing motherboard then you'll want to make sure your new one has at least 2 open PCI slots, etc. motherboards also come with the tin backplate to fit your computer case so the ports will fit just fine.
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May 7, 2012 11:39:42 PM

Ok I'm using two pcie cards, and 4 sticks of sdram.
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