Good thermal paste

Aside from Arctic Silver 5 and its brothers, is ther any good thermal paste out there that you can recommend? Cooler Master for $5 :?:
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  1. I don't buy all the hype around these products. I think AS5 is still the gold standard. I do acknowledge that newer pastes may lower your temps by 1-2 °C relative to AS5.

    The real key to effective thermal management is contact between the surfaces, not so much the paste itself. You may consider lapping both your HS as well as your IHS on your CPU to give two flat surfaces. You'd be amazed just how convex/cave IHSs on C2Ds can really be. Mine was no exception (pics in links).
  2. http://forumz.tomshardware.com/hardware/DaClan-Review-Thermal-Interface-Shootout-ftopict221751.html

    Definitely lap your IHS. ATM, only the outer edges of the IHS on my E6300 make contact with the heat spreader. Hopefully I'll get some sandpaper this week to take care of it.
  3. Quote:
    Definitely lap your IHS. ATM, only the outer edges of the IHS on my E6300 make contact with the heat spreader. Hopefully I'll get some sandpaper this week to take care of it.


    You're in good company; here is a shot from lapping my q6600 (from the thread I referenced above):



    As you can see the material came off the sides first meaning the thing was pretty concave. Let us know how the lapping went for you, take pics, and also measure your temp drop.
  4. The main thing stopping me is the worry that I'll screw up my chip. Not as in having an uneven IHS afterwards, but that I'll grind waaaaaay to much metal off, and that the thing will just buckle under the load of my Tuniq Tower, destroying the chip. I know it's stupid fear, but still.
  5. Irrational fear in my opinion. I have a massive u-120 ex and my q6600 is just fine. Remember the mb has that protective metal thing around the chip. Give it a try and I'm sure you won't regret doing it. It's the best thing you can do for your temps and it'll cost you under $20.
  6. I know it is. I think I'll lap my Tuniq Tower before I do the cpu. If I can get through that without screwing it up, the fear of destroying my cpu will be gone.

    How long did it take you to lap your IHS & heat spreader?
  7. I don't understand why you can't just take the IHS off and cool the chip directly? Didn't AMD have this on the single cores?
  8. On some processors you can do that. There are plenty of guides out there.

    The main reason people don't do it is because it makes the chip more fragile, so you have to be extra carefull when using a heavy hsf like the Tuniq Tower or Ultra 120. Too much pressure will crush the core. Also, the removal of the IHS can destroy the chip. Sometimes the IHS is soldered to the core, which makes it insanly hard to remove. Even when the IHS isnt soldered to the core it's still no walk in the park to do, and most of the time it only knocks a couple c off the temps.

    It works well, but most of the time IHS removal is more trouble then it's worth.

    Oh, and with lga775 chips you have to mod the mobo you're using as well. It's not that extreme, all you have to do is remove the metal bracket that keeps the chip in place, but still.
  9. Quote:
    I know it is. I think I'll lap my Tuniq Tower before I do the cpu. If I can get through that without screwing it up, the fear of destroying my cpu will be gone.

    How long did it take you to lap your IHS & heat spreader?


    That's what I did.. figured if I screw up, it'll cost me like 1/8th as much to replace the HS. Plus, you'll develop a technique as you do the HS and the HS will take longer to do than the CPU will. I believe my HS took me 3-4 hours... but that wasn't constant lapping. Most of the time is spent cleaning off the sandpaper and changing to fresh sand paper. The CPU took maybe 60-90 minutes.

    The key to lapping is NOT TO APPLY MUCH PRESSURE which will give you a FLAT result. Just let gravity, the sandpaper, and the weight of your hand do the work for you.
  10. Some pressure but not very much is the key to lapping. If you use too much pressure the drag will tend to want to "roll" the CPU a little bit and you end up just as convex as you were concave. Although Convex isnt all that bad because then you know for sure you have good solid metal to metal contact directly above the cores.
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