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Which is the better overclocker E4300 OR E4400? Plz Reply!

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May 24, 2007 2:31:58 PM

I am planning an upgrade, for which I am counting on the E4300 or E4400.

Can some body tell me which of these two will over-clock more?

Thanks in advance!

More about : overclocker e4300 e4400 plz reply

May 24, 2007 2:57:09 PM

Е4400
May 24, 2007 4:03:22 PM

You could get an E4300 that overclocks better than a 4400; but a 4400 would usually be better. No guarantees though.
Related resources
May 25, 2007 4:32:55 AM

In the earlier runs these things would hit around 3.6Ghz on air. But nowadays the E4XXX, and even E6XXX's are lucky to break 3.0Ghz. Some wont even get to 3ghz. They max out at 2.8-2.9Ghz. Intel quit building the "overkill" into the C2D months ago. They still OC well. Just not "stellar" like they used to.

I only mention this because alot of people new to C2D dont know this. Try to find a early manufaturing week of the E4XXX and your good to go. Like week 30 or earlier.
May 26, 2007 1:45:12 PM

I only want to over-clock to may be 2.6GHz.

What's the recommended processor, RAM, Motherboard(with integrated graphics)?

I am short on money, so, I will go for integrated graphics.

Thanks in advance!
May 26, 2007 4:59:43 PM

i dont think there are any mobo with built in graphics that are good in OCing
May 26, 2007 5:04:05 PM

Quote:
In the earlier runs these things would hit around 3.6Ghz on air. But nowadays the E4XXX, and even E6XXX's are lucky to break 3.0Ghz. Some wont even get to 3ghz. They max out at 2.8-2.9Ghz. Intel quit building the "overkill" into the C2D months ago. They still OC well. Just not "stellar" like they used to.

I only mention this because alot of people new to C2D dont know this. Try to find a early manufaturing week of the E4XXX and your good to go. Like week 30 or earlier.
I have quite the opposite experience. I bought my first C2D E6400 in October or November. It needed 1.48v to be stable at 3.2GHz. The last week I replaced it with E6420 and I was surprised of its OC-ing abilities. It runs stable OC-ed to 3.2GHz, but undervolted from 1.325v to 1.28125v. Two months ago my friend bought an E4300 and it runs stable OC-ed to 3150(9x350) @ 1.4v. So I guess it is more a question of luck.
May 26, 2007 5:43:40 PM

Quote:
i dont think there are any mobo with built in graphics that are good in OCing


Pssh.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Micro-ATX is slowly becoming more enthusiast-oriented. And this Gigabyte will be available in the US very shortly, it's available in the UK now, and overclockers have been able to get it to over 400 FSB!!
May 26, 2007 6:17:52 PM

Quote:
In the earlier runs these things would hit around 3.6Ghz on air. But nowadays the E4XXX, and even E6XXX's are lucky to break 3.0Ghz. Some wont even get to 3ghz. They max out at 2.8-2.9Ghz. Intel quit building the "overkill" into the C2D months ago. They still OC well. Just not "stellar" like they used to.

I only mention this because alot of people new to C2D dont know this. Try to find a early manufaturing week of the E4XXX and your good to go. Like week 30 or earlier.
I have quite the opposite experience. I bought my first C2D E6400 in October or November. It needed 1.48v to be stable at 3.2GHz. The last week I replaced it with E6420 and I was surprised of its OC-ing abilities. It runs stable OC-ed to 3.2GHz, but undervolted from 1.325v to 1.28125v. Two months ago my friend bought an E4300 and it runs stable OC-ed to 3150(9x350) @ 1.4v. So I guess it is more a question of luck.

The allendale core originally used the exact same "recipe" as the Conroe core which allowed them to clock nearly the same but Intel quickly changed the "recipe." Now Allendales are largely limited by the core, not by other components. My E4300 went up to 375 @ 1.55vcore with temps @50c but I couldn't really get past it. With a full week of tweaking I could get ~385 most likely but I have run into a core limitation. Conroe's easily surpass the Allendale counterparts in OC'ing ability but they cost more (obviously).

Since all 4 series are Allendale native cores I expect the 4400 to scale nearly identically to the 4300. ~2.8Ghz on stock voltage and then the requirements quickly ramp after that.

There is an entire thread devoted to the 4300 clocking here
May 28, 2007 12:59:37 PM

Can any one tell how Intel's G965 series motherboards perform in over-clocking?
On stock to which level I can get with stability and temperatures under control with E4300 & E4400?
Which of these two would easily scale to 2.6 Ghz ,on stock, without any problem with a mobo having Intel G965 chipset?
May 28, 2007 1:18:47 PM

E4400
May 28, 2007 1:23:04 PM

Quote:
Can any one tell how Intel's G965 series motherboards perform in over-clocking?
On stock to which level I can get with stability and temperatures under control with E4300 & E4400?
Which of these two would easily scale to 2.6 Ghz ,on stock, without any problem with a mobo having Intel G965 chipset?


try the gigabyte ds3 965g, it doesnt have the extrme performence of the 965P but it oces just fine
May 28, 2007 2:34:17 PM

hi
Excuse me Far004 i din't think intel motherboards could do anything except the stock they cannot be overclocked .
May 29, 2007 10:36:50 AM

I got my 4400 o/c to over 4 GHz, on after market cooler, but this is a rare CPU i believe, if you want 2.6GHz go for the cheaper 4300, unless there is only a few dollars difference then get the higher multiplied 4400 and clock more out of it :lol: 
May 29, 2007 1:39:04 PM

So, you say that I can not overclock my processor on an Intel mobo, Rahul?
I asked about an Intel CHIPSET mobo with integrated graphics!(may be 965G)

Any ideas, plz do recommend something!
May 29, 2007 2:37:48 PM

4GHz on an Allendale core... how much voltage were you pushing and was it Prime95 stable?

4GHz almost unheard of on an Allendale core w/o LN2.
May 29, 2007 2:47:34 PM

If you are looking to OC to 3.0Ghz or less, I can't imagine it matters which C2D you get. Go for the E4300 and save a cpl dollars.

If you want to really push your system, consider the E6420.
This appears to have some of the best thermals for the C2D line and may give the best extreme OC of all the moderately prices C2Ds.
May 29, 2007 3:23:55 PM

Quote:
I got my 4400 o/c to over 4 GHz, on after market cooler, but this is a rare CPU i believe, if you want 2.6GHz go for the cheaper 4300, unless there is only a few dollars difference then get the higher multiplied 4400 and clock more out of it :lol: 


yea but is it stable for more than 3 minutes?
May 29, 2007 5:21:36 PM

Is your 4Ghz stable? what mobo and ram you have and what are you V settings? I have my 4400 @ 3.33Ghz, but am having trouble getting it higher.
May 29, 2007 5:44:58 PM

It is unlikely that it is stable.

I will await proof.
June 4, 2007 2:01:24 PM

4Ghz is really new to me with air cooling i suppose or that chip i haven't seen a thread with $ghz ,i wolud really like to see the specs and i hope they not fake
June 4, 2007 2:04:49 PM

what are your system specs, voltages, what cooler you running ect...? can you post a cupz validation link?
June 4, 2007 2:08:27 PM

Actually it's quite EZ on Air.

Step #1 - Lug PC and UPS to about 2500Ft above the Snow Line on Mt McKinley.

Step #2 - Setup PC and allow it to adjust to ambient Air Temp ( -20c or so.)

Step #3 - Set the FSB of the E4300 to 1185 with 1:1 memory Ratio.

Step #4 - Rock On!

(Note: Even the Stock Cooling Fan will work with this setup.)
June 5, 2007 12:49:35 AM

extreme optimist aren't we?
June 5, 2007 11:38:42 PM

Quote:
Actually it's quite EZ on Air.

Step #1 - Lug PC and UPS to about 2500Ft above the Snow Line on Mt McKinley.

Step #2 - Setup PC and allow it to adjust to ambient Air Temp ( -20c or so.)

Step #3 - Set the FSB of the E4300 to 1185 with 1:1 memory Ratio.

Step #4 - Rock On!

(Note: Even the Stock Cooling Fan will work with this setup.)


Actually Nooo. I still dond think it will work.
June 6, 2007 1:59:44 AM

wow, you really don't have a sence of humour do you???
June 6, 2007 9:40:09 PM

I imagine the Mt. McKinnely thing would work for just about any overclock up to 600 megahertz FSB. However, since I think at -20 degrees celcius its going to be to cold for the computer to simply START (will the harddrive even spin? you may need solid-state-harddrives), I would not recommend it.

And why would you need to lug UPS to the top of the mountain? Their U-to-the-friggen-PS, they deliver up there Im sure :D 
June 6, 2007 9:46:17 PM

But in all seriousness to the poster:
I would not overclock a E4xxx above 266 without better than stock cooling. If you want stock, and say a 2.66 gigahertz speed, then go with a E4400 (266x10=2660). However if 2.4 sounds good to you, then go with a E4300 (266x9=2400) (roughly).

And if you want long life, then either way I'd go with the E4400. Simply put, it will handle the overclock better at lower than 266 FSB speeds. For example, if you wanted 2.4 gigahertz with an E4400, it would only need a 240 FSB. Then again, being $20 different in price, maybe an E4300 at 266 does not sound more enticing? Hmmm?

Either will work great, but I say if you want more than 2.4 gigahertz to process with, then go with an E4400. The higher multiplier is going to make overclocking so much easier.
June 6, 2007 10:42:49 PM

To the OP,

E4400 Due to 10xMulti. 266*10=2.66Ghz If pad mod works???

I just picked up a combo at Frys last week for $299. It came with a EVGA 122-CK-NF67 A1 680iLT and, Intel E6400. It also had a $40MIR so $259+Tax.

Alot will also depend on your DDR2. My cheap Kingston 6400Value runs default at CAS=2@137. This is on a 915Chipset ECS $99 deal E4300 and P4M800-PRO-M. Runs great at 2.4Ghz stock everything.

It also will depend ALOT on your Motherboard. I assuuuummmmm, you can do the pad/Pin mod on the E4400 just like the E4300?????????????????

Links? Pic's? :D 

Good Luck :lol: 
June 7, 2007 11:45:43 AM

Quote:
But in all seriousness to the poster:
I would not overclock a E4xxx above 266 without better than stock cooling. If you want stock, and say a 2.66 gigahertz speed, then go with a E4400 (266x10=2660). However if 2.4 sounds good to you, then go with a E4300 (266x9=2400) (roughly).

And if you want long life, then either way I'd go with the E4400. Simply put, it will handle the overclock better at lower than 266 FSB speeds. For example, if you wanted 2.4 gigahertz with an E4400, it would only need a 240 FSB. Then again, being $20 different in price, maybe an E4300 at 266 does not sound more enticing? Hmmm?

Either will work great, but I say if you want more than 2.4 gigahertz to process with, then go with an E4400. The higher multiplier is going to make overclocking so much easier.


Thanks buddy!

I got it. Well I have decided to wait for july 22 price cut and then go for an E4400.

What do you say would be enough ram for my pc, I will run Windows XP on it.

What wattage of Power Supply would be enough for my new PC, Please suggest.
June 9, 2007 7:56:29 PM

Hello!

Hey anybody know about any pin mod trick for a pentium 4 prescott 2.4GHz having 533 FSB. As my Intel board won't allow me to overclock the processor, I want to use some pin mod trick to up the FSB from 533 to 800.

Any ideas :?:

Will love to have some information about this topic, Please help me out :D 

Thanks in advance!
June 9, 2007 8:59:08 PM

Quote:
I imagine the Mt. McKinnely thing would work for just about any overclock up to 600 megahertz FSB. However, since I think at -20 degrees celcius its going to be to cold for the computer to simply START (will the harddrive even spin? you may need solid-state-harddrives), I would not recommend it.

And why would you need to lug UPS to the top of the mountain? Their U-to-the-friggen-PS, they deliver up there Im sure :D 


I think he meant Uninteruptable Power Supply ;) 
!