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Question about Linux, Ubuntu, Fedora.

Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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July 24, 2012 2:30:39 PM

So I am thinking about getting an OS like the ones I stated above but I need to know if some things will work on it.
-Will I be able to run Microsoft office on any of them?
-Can I use other files from other windows 7 computers?
-Can I bring my Itunes to any of the above OSs?
- And finally would I be able to put skype on them?

I am a complete noob when it comes to this stuff so any information would be very helpful, thank you!
July 24, 2012 4:28:54 PM

xBUNx said:
So I am thinking about getting an OS like the ones I stated above but I need to know if some things will work on it.
-Will I be able to run Microsoft office on any of them?
-Can I use other files from other windows 7 computers?
-Can I bring my Itunes to any of the above OSs?
- And finally would I be able to put skype on them?

I am a complete noob when it comes to this stuff so any information would be very helpful, thank you!


1) You have 2 choices: a) Install Libre Office or b) Install WINE and install MS Office and run under WINE. In all but a few very specific scenarios (ime) Libre Office is totally equal to MS Office.

2) Yes.

3) You would install it under WINE or you could choose another option to manage your music, like Banshee or Amarok.

4) Yes, there is a native client for Linux
July 25, 2012 1:33:13 PM

Libraoffice or GoogleDocs are good alternatives

As Wombat said you can run many applications through a linux Emulator called WINE ( follow a few instructions to install software with wine)
http://appdb.winehq.org/
Simple go here and look up the application, it is rated on how well it runs and gives install instructions.

Another one that is simplier to use and is based on wine is PLAYONLINUX although it has a smaller list of applications you can install they are single click installs.

Terminology:
Ubuntu and Fedora are both Linux OS's

Ubuntu is better for gaming and better support for more apps

Fedora has more cutting edge technology (I use Fedora 17, but i don't game on it, have a dual boot with windows 7 for gaming)

If you want to dual boot let us know.

Both Ubuntu (and based on ubuntu) & Fedora OS's are very popular and you can find a lot of support. Ubuntu may be a bit more user friendly to start.

Actually you can look up Linux Mint which comes with many things like flash preinstalled. It is based on ubuntu so any guide you find for ubuntu will most likely work with Linux Mint and it is considered the *rising star* in the linux world quickly getting many fans.

http://linuxmint.com/

Feel free to Youtube video's on these distros


Ubuntu Forums & Youtube are great sources for info as is the Winedatabase.
Related resources
July 25, 2012 5:12:18 PM

Just to give a slightly more straightforward answer:

Linux does NOT run Windows programs. There are programs like WINE which allow SOME programs to be run, if you're willing to go through the requisite hassle of making those programs work with the likes of WINE, and very rarely does the latest version (or three) work well or at all.

Often times there are alternative programs which serve much the same purpose, such as LibreOffice being an office suite in much the same manner as MS Office.

Also the file sharing between Linux and Windows tends to be one-way. Windows cannot read Linux partitions without help of a third party program, while Linux can easily read Windows partitions. If you want rather seamless sharing of files, it can be a bit of a hassle to set up, and Microsoft likes it that way, so do not expect it to change any time soon.

Linux can be a great OS, and seems to be about the only refuge left in the coming days with the race to the tablet Microsoft and Apple are engaged in with their respective operating systems. However, it will not be for everyone, so I would strongly suggest that you spend some time lurking on Ubuntu and/or Fedora forums and try to get a feel for some things. Maybe start off with a test install in a VM program like VirtualBox so if it turns out it is not for you, all you have to do is delete the VM and you're done. If you decide you like Linux, then you can go for the full blown dual boot, or even just getting rid of Windows entirely.
July 26, 2012 7:16:01 PM

Just to clarify on the MS Office question, LibreOffice is nearly comparable, and it is capable of opening and saving files in just about every format, including .doc and .docx. So even if the program is not exactly the same, you can still share files and work on projects with people who use MS Office without any issues.
July 26, 2012 7:34:28 PM

In addition to the above, before you jump into Linux, try a bootable live USB with Linux. Linux Mint Maya 13 is a good starting point - it looks quite familiar to those coming from Windows, and comes with a wealth of applications and proprietary codecs and drivers preinstalled (it depends on which version you download, though - some are restricted because of legal requirements). You can download the DVD version, install it from within Windows using unetbootin (see http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/) and create a bootable Linux live USB system. Then you just need to enter your BIOS during boot, and chose to boot from the USB stick. You can play with the Linux distribution and see if it fits your needs. Check the LibreOffice applications and open Word, Excel, or Powerpoint files on your Windows hard drive. See if that fits your needs - if not, try another Linux distribution, for example Ubuntu or Fedora.

By the way, Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu, but uses a different window manager (actually, Linux Mint offers several different windows managers - see the download page). There is one exception - LMDE - which is based on Debian rolling. It is a "rolling" distribution which means in essence that it will update itself to the newest Debian release every time, so you don't ever need to upgrade or install the newer version. The downside is that some upgrades can break some applications, or even the system. However, bug fixes are faster implemented than in other distributions.

If you have a few spare USB sticks with at least 1GB size (better 2-4GB), just download the ISOs of the popular distros you mentioned (including Linux Mint Maya 13) and give them a try. You may fall in love with Linux.
August 1, 2012 4:06:35 AM

Best to just choose Ubuntu or Mint , install on a 2nd box and start suffering. Don't expect miracles, but show some spunk! In two or three years you will feel better about it and ditch M$. You will never be any good at Linux, or feel comfortable with it, but you will learn to survive with Linux and as the Greeks used to say, **better a slave in the land of the living than KING of the underworld.**
August 1, 2012 3:47:50 PM

@cl-scott

Sharing between windows & Linux is easy.
su yum install samba
and your half way done.
You simply set linux up as a file server and it works well.

Mint is the most User Friendly, just keep in mind if you have a question goto the Ubuntu Forums as it's basically the same software and they have a larger community (for the time being mint is growing fast)

They are right there plenty of compaitable software for linux that is FREE

Windows < Linux
Photoshop = Gimp
Microsoft Office = Libreoffice or Google Docs
Mario Kart Racing = Tux Cart Racing
Model Design (modeling software) = Bender
Windows Media Player < Rythembox

Now all these linux (right side) are FREE. They can be very handy in skilled hands, in new hands you will find some slight differences where the windows version has something nicer and that is cause ITS NOT FREE.

nss000 said:
\**better a slave in the land of the living than KING of the underworld.**


Isn't that backwards?
i want to be king.....

Anwyay - Just takes some time and practice and you can make it a fantastic operating system. If your impatient or need quick fixes, sadly this will not be the operating system for you for anything beyond basic email/websurving/video playback.
August 1, 2012 6:54:24 PM

Best be truthful. Why raise silly expectations for an OS only 0.87% of serious computer users can tolerate? Sharing between Linux and Windows is hopelessly obscure -- excepting genetically foozled byteboy mutants.

And SAMBA? Ha hahahaha... nothing **simply** sets up in Linx! It's guru only ( that's 1% of 1% ) meme. Yet normal people do exclusively use Linux every day in production mode. Creating a robust SURVIVOR mentality among potential *nix lusrs is crucial to growing-the-market beyond the mutant fringe. For those dweebs needing TRIUMPHALISM ... can I say iPOD?

c911darkwolf said:
@cl-scott

Sharing between windows & Linux is easy.
su yum install samba
and your half way done.
You simply set linux up as a file server and it works well.

Mint is the most User Friendly, just keep in mind if you have a question goto the Ubuntu Forums as it's basically the same software and they have a larger community (for the time being mint is growing fast)

They are right there plenty of compaitable software for linux that is FREE

Windows < Linux
Photoshop = Gimp
Microsoft Office = Libreoffice or Google Docs
Mario Kart Racing = Tux Cart Racing
Model Design (modeling software) = Bender
Windows Media Player < Rythembox

Now all these linux (right side) are FREE. They can be very handy in skilled hands, in new hands you will find some slight differences where the windows version has something nicer and that is cause ITS NOT FREE.



Isn't that backwards?
i want to be king.....

Anwyay - Just takes some time and practice and you can make it a fantastic operating system. If your impatient or need quick fixes, sadly this will not be the operating system for you for anything beyond basic email/websurving/video playback.

August 1, 2012 7:02:48 PM

nss000 said:
Best be truthful. Why raise silly expectations for an OS only 0.87% of serious computer users can tolerate? Sharing between Linux and Windows is hopelessly obscure -- excepting genetically foozled byteboy mutants.

I can only think that you are particularly backward when it comes to computer literacy. :)  Anyone who has difficulties sharing between Linux and Windows probably shouldn't be trusted with a computer.
August 2, 2012 1:16:18 AM

Did you see my quoted numbers? Of all those who make-a-living with a computer, only 0.87% can tolerate Linux as their OS. Further, only 1/100 of those can configure SAMBA. Your retreat from reality into ultra-elitism simply sucks. Go back to the Slackmolian, Debiolian or LFSarillion primevil forests, pound the CLI & howl at the moon.

I advise the Linux novice to set up a non-interacting, "parallel" universe to his nominal MS/MaC computing . Leverage current understanding in MINT or UBUNTU. Use as seen fit. Solve problems; accommodate. Find novel value in "free" environs . Change.

Ijack said:
I can only think that you are particularly backward when it comes to computer literacy. :)  Anyone who has difficulties sharing between Linux and Windows probably shouldn't be trusted with a computer.

August 2, 2012 2:24:29 AM

Those numbers don't prove a thing. While Linux is used by a small percentage, that is because most people do not bother to try it, not because they find it "intolerable" when they do. There is certainly no downside to putting Ubuntu on a USB stick and trying it out. I myself am perfectly happy with Ubuntu, plus I have an extra $100 in my pocket that I don't have to give to Bill Gates. Oh yes, and I never have to worry about viruses, and any time they come out with a new version I can update for free. I don't know what your problem is with Samba, but this thread is focused on Ubuntu, Fedora, and Linux Mint.
August 2, 2012 6:20:13 AM

Anyone can make up numbers. 86.45% of all statistics are made up.

True we were all noobs with Linux at some point; we were all noobs with Windows and even with computers. So what?
August 2, 2012 3:07:28 PM

most popular distrobutions even provide a simple gui for file sharing (nautalis-share for example), and zeroconf preinstalled for announcing the shares to other pcs on the network. Honestly I would argue SAMBA is easier to configure than sharing folders on windows. ever look at windows homegroup?... wtf is that?
August 2, 2012 5:30:00 PM

Those unchanging *nix usrland numbers (0.87%) prove **everything** ... you are in denial like a drug-addict to say otherwise. As a 1990s Unix (SGI) user and Linux user since Y2K you don't need to convince me of anything.

I advise a practical, segregated path for the new *nix user .. slow uptake with unmixed hardware and software and tasks. If you don't recognize Linux snakepits like DUAL-BOOT, SAMBA, (B/C-SHELL), SOUND, SCANNERS & LAN then you have not read the painful usrland forums these last 10 years; non=geek folks (= 99.12%) just won't deal with that crap! And you are not living in usrland.


Aristotelian said:
Those numbers don't prove a thing. While Linux is used by a small percentage, that is because most people do not bother to try it, not because they find it "intolerable" when they do. There is certainly no downside to putting Ubuntu on a USB stick and trying it out. I myself am perfectly happy with Ubuntu, plus I have an extra $100 in my pocket that I don't have to give to Bill Gates. Oh yes, and I never have to worry about viruses, and any time they come out with a new version I can update for free. I don't know what your problem is with Samba, but this thread is focused on Ubuntu, Fedora, and Linux Mint.

August 2, 2012 6:02:43 PM

So where does this imaginary 0.87% figure come from, other than your imagination? If you are going to keep repeating a statistic at least be honest enough to provide a source for it.

I'm sorry that you find Linux too challenging, but it's no problem for most of us.
August 2, 2012 6:03:10 PM

OK but that is not what this thread is about. OP asked if he could do some fairly simple tasks using Ubuntu, Fedora, and Linux Mint. The answer is yes, he can.
August 3, 2012 3:56:01 AM

My dear Ms AMD_gal ... why did you squelch my response answering the original posters question in-the-negative?
August 3, 2012 6:16:27 AM

Still no source for your 0.87% statistic? Go figure.
August 3, 2012 12:11:56 PM

Look it up on WIKI.

Ijack said:
Still no source for your 0.87% statistic? Go figure.

August 3, 2012 1:56:10 PM

In other words, you made it up. As I thought.

You're not a very good troll, are you?
August 3, 2012 11:37:49 PM

In addition to the OP question of getting standard stuff done on Linux (Ubuntu, Linux Mint or Fedora), I like to address some points about ease of installation and ease of use:

1. In most cases you will be able to install Linux alongside Windows and boot into either, with relative ease. I wouldn't want to try the opposite - Windows has been notorious for wiping Linux disks clean, and if not, it at least replaces the boot loader to only load Windows. BUT: If you have an existing Windows installation, BACK it UP before trying to install Linux, just in case!

2. If a Linux installation works, and it most often does, both the installation process and the update of system files and applications works much smoother than any Windows I've ever seen. In all cases but a kernel update or switching the graphics driver you never need to reboot after installing updates. I can't say that for Windows.

3. Installing or removing applications is mostly easy under Linux. All of the mentioned distributions provide software installers and take care of dependencies, that is if an application needs some specific libraries or stuff, the installer will take care of it. Later on updates can be applied automatically, or by clicking the update icon and entering your password.

4. Under Linux Mint you can select your software via the software selection tool, which is quite well organized and easy to use. You can also use synaptic, or the command line, if you know what you want to install.

5. No need to look for antivirus etc. software for Linux - right now it's not needed. Of course there are security holes that can be exploited, but I haven't yet encountered a single virus in my 15+ years of Linux use. And at times it was kind of fun to watch Internet attacks trying to break into my Linux box. Make sure you install the latest updates, especially security updates, and use a good password and you should be safe.

6. Once you get a little familiar with Linux you will discover that there is whole new world out there with so many nice things that just aren't available under Windows, or only at exorbitant software fees. Have a look at LVM, for example. Or run virtual machines on your Linux PC. Or use your software selection backup in addition to your normal backup for when you want to install the latest and greatest Linux version, together with all the applications you had on your previous install. Or run your own web server to test your homepage designs before you put them online on a hosting provider.

7. Last not least, have fun with it.

P.S.: Linux is much more predominant than what the other guy tries to suggest. Mac OS X is largely a Unix variant and uses many of the same command line utilities that you find in Linux. For example I use the ssh -X username@hostIP on my Macbook to open a remote desktop to my Linux PC. Most streamers, set-top boxes, routers, switches, etc. are Linux-based. So are most web servers on the Internet. Add the Android phones plus the many cloud service providers who use Linux and you will find that Linux or Unix derivatives run closer to 50% of the CPUs worldwide. And when it comes to real computing (mainframes or massive parallel computing), it holds nearly 100% of the market share.
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