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New User to Linux - Many questions

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Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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September 27, 2012 11:18:07 PM

Hi everyone,

I am a new user to Linux because I am totally fed up with shelling out $200+ for Windows OS and another $200 for Microsoft office every time I get a new computer. (So far I think I spent enough for a 1 week vacation to Bori Bori at a 5 star hotel).

Anyhow, I just got a new computer yesterday, here are the specs

Asus P8Z77-V-LK
Nvidia Geforce GTX 660 TI
8 gigs DDR3 Ram.

After deciding to give Windows the boot, I downloaded and installed Ubuntu 12.04 (64 bit) version. Now I am having problems installing the drivers for the above mentioned graphics card. I have downloaded the linux version of the drivers for the graphics card, but I got a file called *nvidia-linux-x86_64-304.51.run. When I double click this file, a white popup shows up but after a while it closes itself then did nothing.

My second concern is, I have 2 x 120 gigbyte SSD hard drives, one of which is currently containing Ubuntu, however I am not noticing the second hard drive.

Any help with these problems is greatly appreciated!

More about : user linux questions

a b 5 Linux
September 27, 2012 11:35:54 PM

The correct video driver is already present in the software repository, no need to be downloading from outside sources.

Did you perhaps (foolishly) set them up in a RAID configuration?

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September 27, 2012 11:52:55 PM

Ummm Raid?, No I don't think so, all I did was plug those two SSD hard drives into 2 sata ports. Then I just installed Ubuntu on the fresh harddrive, one of them isn't showing tho.
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September 27, 2012 11:57:57 PM

Where exactly can I find this software repository? Sorry, I am a total linux noob.

ex_bubblehead said:
The correct video driver is already present in the software repository, no need to be downloading from outside sources.

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a b 5 Linux
September 28, 2012 12:09:29 AM

It's called "Update Manager".
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September 28, 2012 12:16:40 AM

The update manager does not work, after everything has been updated, my graphics still shows as VESA: GK104 Board - 20040001


ex_bubblehead said:
It's called "Update Manager".

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September 28, 2012 2:32:16 AM

If I remember right there should see an icon that looks like a piece of hardware in the upper right corner. If you hover over it, it will say something like "additional drivers". This will allow you to install the correct drivers for your graphics card.

If it's not there, search for "additional drivers" in the Ubuntu menu.
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September 28, 2012 9:53:58 PM

the "additional drivers" does not work either. When I try to install, it keeps saying that it failed and please access /var/log/jockey.log which I do not have a clue where it is located or how to access it even.
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a b 5 Linux
September 28, 2012 9:58:13 PM

Geertt2 said:
the "additional drivers" does not work either. When I try to install, it keeps saying that it failed and please access /var/log/jockey.log which I do not have a clue where it is located or how to access it even.


The error message is giving you the exact path to the file in question (/var/log/jockey.log). You can open a console window and type "cat /var/log/jockey.log" to view the contents. You should see what the problem is there.
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Best solution

October 2, 2012 11:32:35 AM

Good to try out Linux, but that graphics card is going to waste in an operating system that will be unable to play most games. WINE is very limited in what it can do for you - DirectX-only games (the vast majority of modern PC games) won't run. You also don't need to buy Windows/Office for each new computer by the way - reinstall from the discs you already bought :-P

Anyway just for your understanding of how things install in Linux, it's done primarily through an application called the package manager. This works much like the app stores on smartphones and tablets - a single location to search for, download, install and uninstall software. One of Linux's nicest features I think. In Ubuntu you've got Software Centre, which is the place to go for getting software. Ubuntu also has the biggest software repositories (the servers Software Centre connects to in order to fetch your software).

I'm not suggesting scrapping Linux, but if you want to game (and a quality card like that suggests that you do) then you should run both Windows and Linux.
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October 2, 2012 12:56:58 PM

One compromise for your situation - assuming that you want to play games - is to run Windows as your OS but run open source applications (like Libre Office) to replace MS Office. Then you can at least save the $200 on Office. If you aren't gaming, does Ubuntu run normally other than this driver issue?
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October 2, 2012 1:28:10 PM

Excellent suggestion by Aristotelian - I was going to suggest that also. I'd never consider buying Office now - it's superior, but not in any way that really benefits me. Check out http://alternativeto.net/ for alternative applications to do the same job.
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October 2, 2012 7:18:23 PM

Geertt2 said:
Hi everyone,

I am a new user to Linux because I am totally fed up with shelling out $200+ for Windows OS and another $200 for Microsoft office every time I get a new computer. (So far I think I spent enough for a 1 week vacation to Bori Bori at a 5 star hotel).


Purchase the computer with an OS install, then purchase an OEM version of the OS (about $100 if I recall correctly). Use Libreoffice instead of MS Office. Done.
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October 3, 2012 12:33:34 AM

You still going to have to pay for something to run an OS. Whether it is for the OS, or the materials to burn to/with. If you feel like doing research, got another PC hooked to the internet, have the time to test; Go to your local store and buy some usb sticks, or pack of blank CD-R's and DVD's. Then go to distrowatch, search through the os they have, and just download distros that might make good use of your system. Burn them, or use Unetbootin to put compatible iso's on the usb sticks. (Pretty sure you know how to do that, just saying) Testing and patience. New to it, you just have to explore the choices out there. I agree with the people that say you should also dual boot with windows to make use of your hardware eventually.
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