How install linux?

The current way I am installing linux is by making two partitions. One partition for where Linux will be installed, I formatted it as Ext4 and set the mount point to /. Is that correct? Then I make a Logical Partition and make it the swap area and set it to 8GB (amount of RAM I have, they say to double it but thats too much space being wasted.) Is this all correct? I saw another video where you are suppose to make a /home mount point but I don't know if I am suppose to.
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  1. Altiris said:
    The current way I am installing linux is by making two partitions. One partition for where Linux will be installed, I formatted it as Ext4 and set the mount point to /. Is that correct? Then I make a Logical Partition and make it the swap area and set it to 8GB (amount of RAM I have, they say to double it but thats too much space being wasted.) Is this all correct? I saw another video where you are suppose to make a /home mount point but I don't know if I am suppose to.

    We all differ a little in preference as far as partitioning goes, but you are not that far off.
    SOP is to do as you have, but within the Logical or Extended partition create both a swap of 2GB and a /home of most of the remainder of your hard drive space ( less or all of it, as desired ). No need for more than this for swap, especially since your system has 8GB RAM.
    If this is your only OS (you do not say), there will be the option of installing another distro and sharing the swap between them, since GNU/Linux allows for a total of four partitions per hard drive setup.
    The other distro would theoretically have a root ( / ) and a /home in Primary partitions.
    Do not forget to flag the first / as bootable, as well.
  2. LinuxLive USB creator is good. Download distro iso, format usb for fat32, open iso with linuxlive and select usb drive to make bootable usb OS.
  3. I have it installed alongside Windows. I have a 25gb partition for Linux so I take out 2GB for Swap Area and then what do I do with the 23gb left? Divide them and make the boot for one / and another one put the boot /home?
  4. I have the following...

    40GB root (20GB will be more than enough)
    10GB swap (I have 8gigs of ram)
    remaining (500GB+) home
  5. OHH, so the root is /? What's the benefit of having home and / rather than just /? What goes In the root?
  6. OHH, so the root is /? What's the benefit of having home and / rather than just /? What goes In the root?
  7. Think of root as C with your OS, drivers, apps. Home is your downloads, pictures, movies, games, ect. It just helps keep root open, clean for important stuff.

    EDIT: should also note that by creating a partition for /home it'll still be there even if you mess up your OS, partition /home will be the same when you re-install the OS or even switch to a different distro.
  8. Wait but is /home mandatory? How much space should I give /home?
  9. if you don't do it manually your distro will create it on the root partition. Either way you'll have home. Giving it it's own partition is just the better route. Especially if you're new to linux.
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