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What causes that static-like noise?

I have onboard sound and Creative T20 2.0 speakers. The sound is fine until my speakers are about halfway at their volumn, the static just gets bad from there. It doesn't bother me, I don't notice it when I listen to music or watch movies, its just something I noticed from messing with the volumn controls. So I'm curious, what causes that noise?
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More about what static like noise
  1. If the sound gets staticy from changing the volume, then the static could come from the volume knob--basically cheap materials.

    Otherwise, the static is in the source file. Static is not a normal sound that speakers create themselves--hiss and distortion are. So it's either in the file you are playing, or its in the analog components like the volume knob which is inducing the hiss.
  2. interference aka noise, the higher the power( volume/amplification ) the more chance of interference, obviously cheaper parts on cheaper cards make this worse you shouldnt have this problem if you get a decent card like a xfi or similar

    But hey im not sound guru :)
  3. Quote:
    If the sound gets staticy from changing the volume, then the static could come from the volume knob--basically cheap materials.

    Otherwise, the static is in the source file. Static is not a normal sound that speakers create themselves--hiss and distortion are. So it's either in the file you are playing, or its in the analog components like the volume knob which is inducing the hiss.


    I hear the sound when the speaker volumn is set high and nothing is playing, I don't really notice it if something is playing.
  4. I had a pair of old speakers which would do that.
  5. Quote:
    unplug the speakers from the sound card and raise your volume. If you still hear it then it comes from cheap materials and electronics. If you don't hear anymore it could come from the sound card or too cheap cables connectors and extensions. In the latter case buy some good lengh cables made from gold.

    Example when I put mine home theater on the intergrated sound (on another motherboard) I would hear the buzz even at low volume inceasing with volume increases. taking all cables and connectors off and put a single good quality gold cable I still hear the buzz but much lower. When switching to other source like radio for example the buzz disappear completly. After a while I blew out my onboard sound... oh man... too much power for the onboard to handle anyways.. get better electornics and cables and it will reduce the buzz sound.

    btw you WON'T BE ABLE to remove completly that buzz sound. You do know a transistor is either ON or OFF state but with the current technology the OFF state is far from being 100% off. The transistor's gate still let some leaking current pass throught.


    I disconnected the cable from the speakers, put the volumn up all the way, there was very little static and to hear it I had to put my ear to the speaker. So it must be the cable or the sound card, I'll see what happens with a better cable.
  6. I have the same problem, and worse.

    It has nothing to do with audio source or sound sound. I disconnect everything, just power up the speaker (besides the power adapter that came with the speaker, I also tried a 12V DC power adapter, and a 12V battery), and the noise appears (only from right channel speaker). Turning the volume knob up and down has no effect on the static noise. However, when I moved slowly around the speaker, the level of the static noise would change.

    I found out that the circuit of the T20 would pick up radio waves. I opened the speaker housing and examined inside. Couldn't visually find anything wrong. All contacts were perfect and silicon was used to fix cables.

    When I use my finger to touch the pins of the VRs (for volume control and bass/treble adjustment), the static noise turned into the broadcasting of a local radio station, loud and clear !!!

    It is just crazy. The layout of the printed circuit board must have created a loop like a radio antenna. I couldn't find a solution for this static noise which is annoying, because I use the T20 to enjoy classical music.

    I don't know if Creative Lab knows this and has a solution. The T20 is not cheap.
  7. they do make a T20W which is the wireless version
    I guess the regular T20 must inorporate some of the wireless receiver circuitry
    probably around the 2.4ghz band as most wireless is 2.4
    If you have a router move it away from speakers

    this is from Wikipedia

    Another commonly used shielding method, especially with electronic goods housed in plastic enclosures, is to coat the inside of the enclosure with a metallic ink or similar material. The ink consists of a carrier material loaded with a suitable metal, typically copper or nickel, in the form of very small particulates. It is sprayed on to the enclosure and, once dry, produces a continuous conductive layer of metal, which can be electrically connected to the chassis ground of the equipment, thus providing effective shielding

    Dont know if you want to go to that trouble
    windsheild repair kits come with copper paint
    also can be found in hardware stores
    would have to remove components when applying
    would have to connect to ground on PCB

    here is link to Wikipedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_shielding
  8. Thanks for your reply and information. It is very useful. I will try dealing with the router first.


    king smp said:
    they do make a T20W which is the wireless version
    I guess the regular T20 must inorporate some of the wireless receiver circuitry
    probably around the 2.4ghz band as most wireless is 2.4
    If you have a router move it away from speakers

    this is from Wikipedia

    Another commonly used shielding method, especially with electronic goods housed in plastic enclosures, is to coat the inside of the enclosure with a metallic ink or similar material. The ink consists of a carrier material loaded with a suitable metal, typically copper or nickel, in the form of very small particulates. It is sprayed on to the enclosure and, once dry, produces a continuous conductive layer of metal, which can be electrically connected to the chassis ground of the equipment, thus providing effective shielding

    Dont know if you want to go to that trouble
    windsheild repair kits come with copper paint
    also can be found in hardware stores
    would have to remove components when applying
    would have to connect to ground on PCB

    here is link to Wikipedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_shielding
  9. i get weird sounds sometimes when i load my graphics card (weird right?) and I think those are due to electrical interference. does varying load change your sounds at all?
  10. Start your own thread please :)
    We would be glad to help
  11. This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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