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Windows 8 Beta (Consumer Preview) first impressions

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February 29, 2012 7:58:04 PM

Short story is keep Windows 7 for your desktop and laptop but don't count out Windows 8 for your tablet, because it has the potential to be pretty good for tablet use (READ: TOUCH FRIENDLY).

Long story:

When I first installed it and ran through the initial startup I noticed right away that simple was the name of the game for Windows 8, with a plain background and a few questions and your off. Right away your greeted with the Metro sexual a mean Metro interface.... Not so bad at first look but when you need to get to it from the desktop (it replaces the start menu) you might be a bit lost at first and frustrated because it took me about 5 to 10 minutes to realize how to get to it from the desktop! You have to mouse over to the very bottom left corner of the screen (I mean the very last few pixels of the corner of the screen) and click on it but the thing is its blank, just a blank piece of the task bar from where the start orb SHOULD be. So how I'm I supposed to do that on a regular basis? They should have just kept the start orb and let that be the thing you click to get to the Metro interface.... If anybody is familiar with the Ubuntu Unity bar than this should sound similar, If mouse over to the very bottom right corner of the screen a little dock shows up on the right side of the screen with buttons for settings, start (Metro), search, and something else I can't remember at the moment.It's pretty useless and ends up feeling tacked on just like the rest of Metro. The only thing I found it useful for is easier access to settings but it ends up being a necessity while in Metro as it's needed to access settings for Metro and other things. Overall they should have left that in Metro only. Another thing that took me awhile to find was the control panel, you have to go through the Metro/side dock to get it! Bad thing is the control panel is the same as in Windows 7 for the most part but where is the bad part you say? Well to change settings for Metro you must go through the Metro interface to do it making you juggle between two interfaces and settings. That is exactly what Windows 8 feels like, a juggle between two different interfaces that don't seem to play nice together. However there still is good to be found for power users. For those that like (including me) ribbon has made a comeback! but into Windows Explorer this time which provides a lot of options, configurations, and the like. In addition to this, the task manager has gotten an overhaul, adding much more functionality to it and ease of use. We may still be in the Beta phase but for power users and just desktops/laptop users in general, you should stay away because this OS seems much more oriented to touch based mobile devices and to think that if Microsoft would have actually integrated Metro instead of tacking it on, Windows 8 would be much better. All in all, there is not much incentive to upgrade especially considering that Windows 8 is still based on the Windows NT 6.x kernal just like Vista and 7 (6.2 for Windows 8, 6.1 for 7, and 6.0 for Vista) meaning most programs should compatible between the three OS'. They probably well even have DirectX 11.1 for Windows 7 and maybe even Vista.

But you know, you don't have to take my word for it so I just recommend you try it while you can (VirtualBox anybody?).
a b * Windows 8
February 29, 2012 10:48:44 PM

I also found the CP version to be a bit of a mess. Personally, I think they should give users the option to outright disable the Metro interface if a non-touch device is being used (and go directly to the desktop without having to find the Metro style button to get there every single time you boot your machine up). For desktop users, Metro only gets in the way, so let me get Metro out of my way.

For tablet users any any other touch devices that come along, I suspect this is going to work great. We finally have a version of Windows built with an interface that has touch only devices in mind.
February 29, 2012 11:07:56 PM

It was a bit of a mess for a while, but now that I'm a few hours into it, and I've cleaned up the metro screen and replaced the useless tiles with all of my apps, it's starting to grow on me.
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a b * Windows 8
February 29, 2012 11:09:40 PM

I'm starting to figure it out as well, I just worry about the less technically savvy users who are going to take one look at it and start the FUD slinging all over again as we see with every single version of Windows.
March 1, 2012 1:17:04 AM

Less technically user will find a way for Windows 8 to work for them like they did with every other thing they use.
March 1, 2012 9:24:21 AM

But when comes down to it I don't want a mobile touch-centric interface on my desktop, give me the option to disable it. I really hope they listen to the feedback....
March 1, 2012 11:14:46 AM

whooleo said:
But when comes down to it I don't want a mobile touch-centric interface on my desktop, give me the option to disable it. I really hope they listen to the feedback....

But if you disable it you won't be able to enjoy the new immersive and content rich programs that are designed for windows 8... you know.... like that finger painting thing... :) 

Jokes aside, I knew something was up when the metro interface popped up and the desktop tile was nowhere to be seen. My first thought was 'Oh, you have got to be kidding me... wait, there it is!" and I promptly moved it to the front of the list. After organizing it (Into Home which has control panel, desktop, e-mail, weather, and other 'useful' tiles, People, Games, Applications) then it started being a little more useful. I still think I will mostly use the desktop, but I find the new start screen at least a slight improvement over the old start menu that I hated for all these years.
March 1, 2012 12:44:28 PM

I personally kinda like the idea of Metro. I don't like having to flip between UIs. But I do dig having the apps directly in front of me. Basically just a click away from every thing I need. IE, Mail, Media, etc. I'm gonna have to play around a bit more to really see the ins and outs. But the concept is pretty cool. Dont know why they couldn't just SP Metro into Win7...something to the effect of a toggle. Hide the taskbar and the Metro apps display on your desktop...or both at the same time I suppose.

I ran in a VB last night...think I'm actually gonna bite the bullet and actually install and hope all goes well. ;) 
a b * Windows 8
March 1, 2012 1:02:12 PM

If Microsoft can make switching between UI's feel a little less like you're switching UI's, Metro could really work on the desktop/laptop side. After playing with the CP build in a VM for a few hours last night, I'm starting to warm up to Metro a bit. Once you realize how everything is organized and how it's supposed to work when using a mouse and keyboard, it's actually not all that bad.
March 1, 2012 2:51:22 PM

I actually enjoy the split in UI. This lets me know what world I am in. Metro --> Apps and Desktop --> Power Use. I don't want my desktop to be a playground for apps. and this works well.
March 1, 2012 4:06:59 PM

so far so good. I slapped it on a 250g sata drive in my 1100 Thuban rig.
March 1, 2012 4:27:20 PM

I really like what they did with the task manager.
And yes metro is ok I liked the start menu more but metro is ok. (After 2-3 hours of moving stuff)
March 1, 2012 4:32:02 PM

So far I dont like that the local account doesnt offer sign-in and out options on the different apps. I would also like to see close buttons as well. Other then them two things Im really liking it. Im sure as I mess around with it Ill find other annoyances, but for now it isnt bad.

Oh, driver support could be better as well (I know it just came out and all that :)  ).
March 1, 2012 5:33:48 PM

woo hoo! rt click on a metro app on the left of the screen and you get an option to close it! That was a feature sorely missed in DB.

I did the 'upgrade' option from 7 home 64bit to CP8 and everything went very smoothly. All of my productivity software seems to work (office and Adobe suite). Adobe Audition still requires permission to run every time I open it, but at least it does not turn off the class UI look like it did back in 7. Only program I had to uninstall was Security Essentials (which is pretty much the same as Windows Defender anyways), and there were a few very old video converter/transcoder/cleanup tools I had to re-install, but they appear to be working fine. The thought was to just do this as a test, but I may stick with it for a while as I have not lost any functionality.

It is rough going from my netbook with a touch interface, and the desktop with keys/mouse as they behave a little differently, but I'm sure I will get over it.

Win8 really needs some sort of voice text input option (think google search) to avoid using the screen keyboard. Screen keyboard works fine (especially thumbs layout), but voice would be even better.

I find the video/audio/picture apps to be entirely useless now that I have had a chance to use them. I have thousands of pictures and it has a rough time displaying most of them (and they are simple jpg files). Music app is only finding ~30 CDs (thankfully WMP works fine at least), and the Video app completely ignores my filing system (movies, shows, AMVs, Projects, Funnys, etc.) and throws everything in one huge heap of unsorted insanity. Also, the music app displays album art in the background of the player... which is a great idea, except that it is not my music, nor is it music I like, and it is not they type of images I want displayed on my PC when my kid and wife are around. grr.
Neat idea for each of the multi-media apps, just poorly executed.
March 1, 2012 8:55:12 PM

Thanks for the tip caedenv. I will try that next time.
March 1, 2012 9:11:34 PM

My short story:
I Have checked out the Windows 8. There are some great new features,
but i doubt if it's worth calling a new OS. I myself find it more a new expansion
for Windows 7*.
*This without the metro GUI in it.

My long story:
Once again Microsoft manages it to make a system full of crap*.
For instance the whole metro GUI. It just doesn't work fine on
a desktop. However on a tablet it would be awesome.
Than again i asked myself, what tablet? There is no good working
Windows tablet yet. (like an Ipad) the smoothness of the Ipad, ive
never seen it in a Windows tablet, YET.

I also don't like the almost forcing way of Microsoft to login with
you're Windows Live ID. I mean for hacking purposes this is
awesome. But for a safer computer, this is a plague. I mean,
instead of just getting the credit-card information or bank information
using social engineering we now get a free bonus.
We get all his personal files*, since windows is syncing your
data with the Live server aka Windows Skydrive/dive?
So now we know a lot more of the person to border him/her in
future.
*Please don't take me wrong, there are also lots of good things.
*You can turn this feature off. but the ugly truth is that the average
pc user won't do this.

Now the positive side of Windows 8.
-I love the new Task manager, i only hope i don't have to click on
'expand' every single time.
-I really really love the new file copying GUI. It makes things much
more clear, specially with multiple files.

And so the're are many more new features!
Also i think using Windows 8 on a ipad for example will be a great
experience.

Metro.
Metro is not designed for a desktop/notebook.
Why? Like 'op*' earlier said, you have to go to the very last pixels of
you're monitor to get to start or something. It just doesn't work great
with a mouse. Beside that, i think its very ugly. Some call it clean
design, i call it a unfinished project. I mean just Green/blue/white
and stuff and thats it... It's 2012 Microsoft you really have to do
more to convince me to buy the OS.
*OP; Original poster.

Overall, you should test it yourself but i think it is nothing more than a
expansion pack for Windows 7. I mean without the new metro GUI i can't
call it a new OS. It's just another stunt to suck money out of civilians.

-Hypertraxx
March 2, 2012 2:12:45 PM

I don't necassarily agree with all the criticism. But one thing that I dont like is that once you've linked social accounts(FB, Windows Live, etc) it will display photos from those accounts in the Photo App, but you have no manipulative authority over them.

If you have access to all accounts in one place, let me manipulate them from that place. Unless of course I'm mistaken.
March 2, 2012 2:35:49 PM

I had messed around with the beta awhile back and find this consumer preview much better. I kind of like it actually, it's all pretty slick, certainly takes awhile to find all the controls but they are all there.

I am dual booting windows 8 with windows 7 and it all works well, Microsoft was requesting that the disk partition I had set up for windows 8 be at least 25GB instead of the 20GB I had allocated, installed it anyway and it all works fine, pretty fast too.

The metro GUI works fine for me with a keyboard and mouse but I probably have to agree it would better and make more sense on a touchscreen tablet or smartphone. However at home, just click the desktop icon on the metro screen and your basically back in windows 7 mode.

I have yet to figure out how to group the apps on the main metro screen but I am working on it, I also would like to know it the sidebar, start menu app and left hand views could be locked so they stay open all the time on the metro screen allowing a little less clicking around.

March 2, 2012 2:47:38 PM

Surley all this new metro stuff greatly depends on the developers creating new software that make best use of the new shinny shinny.

Any one use Aero desktop's nice features? i know i dont. 3D alt>tab?

Microsoft really need to make an OS with no bloat, trimed down and fast.
March 2, 2012 7:41:44 PM

I liked:

1. Task manager. Probably the biggest improvement I've seen. It shows everything: processor usage, memory usage, hard disk usage AND network usage for every process out there.
2. Weather forecast program (or app, as they call it).
3. Integrated PDF viewer, which looks nice and works faster than adobe reader!

I disliked:
1. Installation #1. Couldn't install windows on a separate partition, because for some reason Windows 8 needed GPT partition table, and MBR wasn't good enough. Even though there wasn't another OS on the drive, I still had 700 GB of important data on it, so I had to get another hard drive to be able to install it.
2. Installation #2. It asked me about configuration questions. The most annoying ones, were about privacy. Almost every other one "do you want to send data about programs you use" or "do you want microsoft to collect data about your location". What kind of question is that? Do they want to spy on me? The worst thing is that they are turned on by default.
3. I didn't like the fact that I have to log in to windows live to be able to open programs that are installed on MY computer. What's up with that?
4. Missing old start menu/button. I know it's possible to bring it back via regedit, however, my opinion is that there should be an option to do it in the control panel.
5. Word 'apps'. Is it even a word? What happened to good old programs, applications, or even software? Who Microsoft tries to address by using such wording? Inexperienced users wouldn't even understand what that word means, there are no explanations what it means, even if it's used in every other tooltip.
6. I miss the X on the right top of the programs. After using it for a few hours, I still didn't get it how to turn the programs off other than alt + f4, which, I think, shouldn't be the meant way to do it.
7. Ads in start menu. Why is it advertising XBOX? Isn't it famous enough? "GO GET GAMES FOR YOUR XBOX ONLY IN XBOX LIVE STORE".
8. Random lock-ups. Happened three times already, and it seems it happens when opening some programs, for example CPU-z or 3d mark. Though I am sure they will fix it before real release.
9. What happened to windows key + tab ? I really love it as it is in windows 7, though, it seems they 'nerfed' it for windows 8.



After using it for a few hours, I am quite disappointed and I know for sure I won't be upgrading any time soon. It just feels that those windows weren't made for desktops, only for computers with touchscreen. I don't know why, but there's an impression that they are trying to make their operating system feel like cloud SaaS (software as a service), just like Gmail or facebook is with their mini addons and widgets. What they fail to realize is that people don't need that kind of stuff on their computers, especially if they are built in and it's impossible to disable them (I don't know if it is). Those things just increase booting times and are just wasting precious computer resources.
March 2, 2012 8:21:56 PM

I love how people can declare an non retail release OS useless and pointless after trying it for a few hours. This OS (if executed properly from here) will be the game changer. Its not perfect, but it's the starting point.

If people aren't willing to give it a shot, then just back to command prompt without a mouse...
March 2, 2012 8:30:59 PM

I certainly like it better than the Dev Preview. Its a helluva lot more stable. I also think its not perfect- but it isn't bad. My bulldozer likes it, and its quite fast. I loaded Skyrim last night and played on Ultra settings til about 5am. I am happy with the experience overall.

Yeah Metro is for mobile devices only but it isn't that hard to work around. I wish they still had a start button for ease of shutdown/restart/etc.
March 3, 2012 1:31:55 AM

Ok, after a few more hours Im really liking it. Im navigating through the start/metro screen like a pro,hehe. Once I realized about the four corners everything is simple as can be. Im also really liking the customization as far as what apps I want displayed. After seeing alot of complaints on other forums Im coming to the conclusion that people are not giving it a fair try. I think its the learning on how Metro works is what is turning people off? Which is a shame cause it really is an easy os to navigate once I learned a few things.
March 3, 2012 2:38:39 AM

Yeah, The metro UI and "live" tiles will become more useful as developers churn out apps and modify existing apps to work with the UI. In the meantime, I'm just using the tiles as you would imagine, just as launch points for my existing applications.
a b * Windows 8
March 3, 2012 5:33:26 AM

Sunius said:

I liked:
1. Task manager. Probably the biggest improvement I've seen. It shows everything: processor usage, memory usage, hard disk usage AND network usage for every process out there.


The new Task Manager is excellent! I wish we had this in Windows Vista and 7.

Sunius said:
I disliked:
1. Installation #1. Couldn't install windows on a separate partition, because for some reason Windows 8 needed GPT partition table, and MBR wasn't good enough. Even though there wasn't another OS on the drive, I still had 700 GB of important data on it, so I had to get another hard drive to be able to install it.


The Consumer Preview can be installed on an MBR partition. I have 2 laptops and a virtual machine that confirm it. How big was the drive you were trying to install the Beta on?

Sunius said:
2. Installation #2. It asked me about configuration questions. The most annoying ones, were about privacy. Almost every other one "do you want to send data about programs you use" or "do you want microsoft to collect data about your location". What kind of question is that? Do they want to spy on me? The worst thing is that they are turned on by default.


Most of this has to do with the Metro apps (think about how Facebook and other social networking sites operate, and how they get their data. You get asked this stuff all the time) and how they will work once the OS hits RTM and everyone gets their hands on it. Microsoft already asks these types of questions in the CEIP (Customer Experience Improvement Program) in Windows 7 and prior, they just don't word the questions this way. If you're really that concerned, just opt out of it and move on.

Sunius said:
3. I didn't like the fact that I have to log in to windows live to be able to open programs that are installed on MY computer. What's up with that?


These are Metro apps that were included as part of the Customer Preview. On the desktop, you do NOT have to use them (nor would I recommend using them for any length of time. They don't work very well unless you're using a tablet or other touch oriented device).

Sunius said:
4. Missing old start menu/button. I know it's possible to bring it back via regedit, however, my opinion is that there should be an option to do it in the control panel.


I don't mind the direction they are going with this, but I would like to see some kind of visual cue as to where you need to move your mouse on the desktop side to access the Start menu. I can see this initially confusing many users.

Sunius said:
5. Word 'apps'. Is it even a word? What happened to good old programs, applications, or even software? Who Microsoft tries to address by using such wording? Inexperienced users wouldn't even understand what that word means, there are no explanations what it means, even if it's used in every other tooltip.


It's the new buzz word. Apple uses it everywhere and no one seems to be complaining. But when Microsoft does it, suddenly it's a problem?

Sunius said:
6. I miss the X on the right top of the programs. After using it for a few hours, I still didn't get it how to turn the programs off other than alt + f4, which, I think, shouldn't be the meant way to do it.


No idea what you're talking about here. The X is still present in everything except the Metro apps. Metro apps don't get closed though. To back out of a Metro app, click and hold on the top of the screen and drag the window to the bottom of the screen. Release the mouse button and the app will move into the background. Windows 8 will automatically close the app after a period of inactivity, or when the resources it is using are needed for other programs.

Sunius said:
7. Ads in start menu. Why is it advertising XBOX? Isn't it famous enough? "GO GET GAMES FOR YOUR XBOX ONLY IN XBOX LIVE STORE".


Microsoft is tying all of these services together. It started with Windows Phone 7, and now all of their major platforms are being updated to tie into each other. It's not advertising per se, but if you don't like it, unpin the Xbox stuff from the Start menu.

Sunius said:
8. Random lock-ups. Happened three times already, and it seems it happens when opening some programs, for example CPU-z or 3d mark. Though I am sure they will fix it before real release.


First, this is still a beta release. I haven't had any lock-up issues myself, but given where we are in the development process for Windows 8, I'm not at all surprised that someone is having these kinds of problems. It's also up to the application vendors to fix their code so it runs under Windows 8.

Sunius said:
9. What happened to windows key + tab ? I really love it as it is in windows 7, though, it seems they 'nerfed' it for windows 8.


I didn't use this a whole lot myself, but I know many people who used it and loved it in Windows 7. Would be a shame if they axed it in 8. I'll keep my fingers crossed that they've only temporarily disabled it in the Consumer Preview though.



Sunius said:
After using it for a few hours, I am quite disappointed and I know for sure I won't be upgrading any time soon. It just feels that those windows weren't made for desktops, only for computers with touchscreen. I don't know why, but there's an impression that they are trying to make their operating system feel like cloud SaaS (software as a service), just like Gmail or facebook is with their mini addons and widgets. What they fail to realize is that people don't need that kind of stuff on their computers, especially if they are built in and it's impossible to disable them (I don't know if it is). Those things just increase booting times and are just wasting precious computer resources.


After using this in a VM and 2 laptops over the last 24 hours, I can assure you that this will work quite well on a desktop or laptop. This is not being developed purely for touch devices, where desktops / laptops are being ignored. Microsoft wants people to get used to this type of interface, so they all but removed the desktop / laptop elements of the UI in the Dev Preview. Now they will gradually add everything back in so that we get a completely functional OS that works on both platforms (although I would like to see an option for the system not to throw up the Metro Start menu when I am booting up a desktop or laptop. Going straight to the desktop would be much more preferable).
March 3, 2012 9:25:59 AM

Quote:

The Consumer Preview can be installed on an MBR partition. I have 2 laptops and a virtual machine that confirm it. How big was the drive you were trying to install the Beta on?


The drive itself is 1 TB, and the partition I tried to install it to was 100 GB. When I plugged in additional hard drive, I had to delete all the partitions so it would let me install windows on it.

Quote:

Most of this has to do with the Metro apps (think about how Facebook and other social networking sites operate, and how they get their data. You get asked this stuff all the time) and how they will work once the OS hits RTM and everyone gets their hands on it. Microsoft already asks these types of questions in the CEIP (Customer Experience Improvement Program) in Windows 7 and prior, they just don't word the questions this way. If you're really that concerned, just opt out of it and move on.


What concerns me is that there are things to that running on my computer, even if I opt out of it. It means more memory and processor usage, which, isn't good thing at all. Also, the default setting should be off, because, most (read: not all) users will just ignore those messages and press next next next so they finish the installation faster.

Quote:

These are Metro apps that were included as part of the Customer Preview. On the desktop, you do NOT have to use them (nor would I recommend using them for any length of time. They don't work very well unless you're using a tablet or other touch oriented device).


I liked PDF viewer. Though, still, the programs are installed on the computer, and it feels like I just have to log in to confirm who I am? It's like DRM on some steam game, just on much much bigger scale.


Quote:

It's the new buzz word. Apple uses it everywhere and no one seems to be complaining. But when Microsoft does it, suddenly it's a problem?


Sure, apple might have used it (I don't know that, never had an apple device), but I think it doesn't fit at all for windows.

Quote:

No idea what you're talking about here. The X is still present in everything except the Metro apps. Metro apps don't get closed though. To back out of a Metro app, click and hold on the top of the screen and drag the window to the bottom of the screen. Release the mouse button and the app will move into the background. Windows 8 will automatically close the app after a period of inactivity, or when the resources it is using are needed for other programs.

Weren't 'metro apps' the only programs that were installed in the OS apart from IE10? Then, if I am not supposed to use them, shouldn't OS give us basic applications for everyday tasks without the need for installing them from third party vendors?

Quote:

Microsoft is tying all of these services together. It started with Windows Phone 7, and now all of their major platforms are being updated to tie into each other. It's not advertising per se, but if you don't like it, unpin the Xbox stuff from the Start menu.

Cool, I didn't know I could unpin them. Yet, they expect their customers to use their other services, like windows phone or XBOX, but let's be honest, how much percentage of windows users use that? 2%? maybe 5%?

Quote:

After using this in a VM and 2 laptops over the last 24 hours, I can assure you that this will work quite well on a desktop or laptop. This is not being developed purely for touch devices, where desktops / laptops are being ignored. Microsoft wants people to get used to this type of interface, so they all but removed the desktop / laptop elements of the UI in the Dev Preview. Now they will gradually add everything back in so that we get a completely functional OS that works on both platforms (although I would like to see an option for the system not to throw up the Metro Start menu when I am booting up a desktop or laptop. Going straight to the desktop would be much more preferable).


Let's hope so!
March 5, 2012 8:11:24 PM

so far im loving windows 8... i have to admit, at first i thought i would hate it from what i saw, but i must say, im a bit taken aback and totally had to eat my words. i love it and i cant wait for the final release.

Only thing im somewhat nervous about is trying it on the gaming pc i have. ill probably try it on a second hard drive or something and see how it goes, and will definitely wait for the final release until i make it my main pc's main o.s.
March 5, 2012 8:41:51 PM

Still doesn't make much sense from a business standpoint. I don't care if I'm beating a dead horse, give us an option to disable metro in the professional and enterprise editions. And yes, I have used Windows 8 extensively and am not basing my opinion off of 5 minutes of use. Business users and employes aren't going to want, or even be able to memorize a bunch of keyboard shortcuts in order to use the OS efficiently with a mouse and keyboard. The desktop mode is Ok but I hate how they try and get you to a have to go back to the metro interface as much and as often as possible.
March 6, 2012 4:15:27 AM

Ok, so I'm typing from the Consumer Preview now. As an IT pro, initial thoughts were that I hated the metro interface. I think now after making myself use it, Metro is great for tablets. However, I've honestly spent a good deal of my time trying to get the traditional Start Menu back. Which is possible using an application called ViStart. That said, it makes Windows 8 feel more natural.

What I would like to see in the final release is for Microsoft to allow desktop and laptop users to have an install that is basically a clone of Windows 7 if they choose. While I understand that metro is cool, let's be real, the metro interface is not really condusive to those with a keyboard and mouse. If you are using a tablet, GREAT IDEA. If you are using a desktop with a touch screen, that's cool no problem. But the thing is in a work environment, people need to simply be able to get things done, not play with metro. I think even if a user chooses to have a Windows 7 style experience on Windows 8, they could put a shortcut for metro out there to where you can still access those apps and work with it, I think the two can coexist, but I do not think users should be forced into the new interface. Also a lot of older people buy computers maybe not knowing any better, and I can see metro being VERY confusing. The first time I actually messed with metro I was not sure what to think either. I'm not an old pro, but I could probably manage.

Likes....

Install was smooth-no worries there
The fact that they did at least include a desktop environment

Dislikes
Metro--Not that metro is bad but that they are forcing Metro on a user
Think new interface will be confusing for some at first, particularly users who will be migrating from Windows XP machines will have a wakeup call.

Wants...
Give me a way to have my traditional start menu and desktop if I desire
Give users an option to disable the Hot corners and charms if they wish

Other thoughts.......
I feel like after I used the ViStart app to enable a traditional Start Menu, the PC became a lot more familiar to me...I think that people were just forgiving Microsoft for Vista and that for desktop/laptop users they hit the nail on the head with Windows 7. While I agree that Metro can be a good idea, I think users should have more choice to customize their experience. If you are a desktop PC user and want to have a Windows 7 look a feel, there needs to be a classic interface that allows for that. But if you use a tablet and want to use metro, include that also.

Just kinda thinking I don't know how Windows 8 will go. I think if Microsoft is smart maybe give the user a choice during install as to what interface they want(or the first time they start the PC for those who buy a prebuilt), and then have controls in control panel to allow the user to customize their own experience, but still leave shortcuts for people to use in case they want to check out and ease into new OS features, but do not force them into changes. Just 2 cents from a guy who's been working on and with Windows PC's since Windows 95(Though my first computer was a commodore 64 at age 5). How about that lol.
March 6, 2012 4:21:23 PM

I dont get it. People download a new version of Windows, then try to make it like the old version. Why don't people give it an actual shot. Leave it alone and just adapt to the changes. Then you will see the flaws with the OS for what it is, not for what you are used to.

I can see if it was a viable concern. But all the complaining of no start button is really rediculous. I for one have no issues without a start button. I find it hard to believe that it's that large of an issue. Especially since the start button is basically exploded on the desktop for you.
I rather believe that people just like to whine and complain and have no sense of good change. You start the computer and there is your start button. All your apps in front of you. One click and you are where you need to be. Not only that, but alot of the apps are live fed and updated so you can plainly see them. The OS doesn't run slow because of it. It's not hard to read. Its' not hard to get around from one thing to the next. A 5 year old could do it. But grown men whine...give me a break.

Every time someone complains about the no start button, I think of someone on a horse looking at a car saying "those things are a joke".
March 6, 2012 6:10:35 PM

The issue is "We" the IT pros have to deal with users that are still complaining about the fact that new computers cannot be purchased with Windows XP and just have a fit trying to figure out Windows 7 which is basicly identicle to XP from the user stand point just imagine Joe Boss man that just loves his XP computer then you throw Windows 8 at him and i can see it already please remove this and put Windows 7 back on... ect. I am still downgrading to XP in some i5 systems for heavens sake... i have used Windows 8 a fair bit and it is zippy i see a good use for the start screen for dumb people aka granny and non computer people... I just want a destop so do 90% of the users out there. i get the idea of a unification of OS's i just dont think it can be done in a way to make everyone happy.

Thent
March 6, 2012 7:00:03 PM

I get you...but imagine if they stopped making DVD players and VCRs because adults at the time needed their kid to instruct them how to use it?

And you said it yourself..."i see a good use for the start screen for dumb people aka granny and non computer people"...but the dumb guy who is asking for XP on his i5 machine cant seem to get it? It's not a matter of intellect, it's a matter of effort. And I think we both agree that Win8 is easy enough for a granny, so it boils down to just plain old effort. I refuse to be Dad who gives up and asks his 12 year old son "how do I work this thing." :)  If someone can't handle Win8 tell them to go buy Apple
March 6, 2012 8:44:20 PM

Not how it works in IT my friend. If you are an IT pro, can't be that way. Users want things their way and they want it yesterday.

Also, metro may be cool, but as I said, metro is great for tablets, not a desktop in my opinion. If something is not broken, don't fix it. I used to be Mac certified btw, put linux or a Mac system in front of someone who's only ever used Windows. They are going bug you with a question every few minutes.
March 7, 2012 5:30:27 PM

Lol one of the best things you could do for your mac. I'm allowed to say that bc I was Mac certified for a couple of years lol.
a b * Windows 8
March 7, 2012 6:01:54 PM

I tested the x86 version on a average spec laptop and it was painful to use and clumsy compared to Win7.

Intel Pentium Dual-Core T2310 (1.46GHz)
Intel 965GM Video
120GB Seagate 7200rpm
3GB DDR2-4200
Realtek 8169/8168/8101 PCI/PCIe
RaLink RT73 Wireless G Network Card
Realtek ALC883 High Definition Audio

Only good thing, it found and installed all the drivers during install.
March 8, 2012 6:48:05 AM

Whers the start menu button? What are they thinking by takeing it out they have lost there minds...
March 8, 2012 7:29:35 AM

They lost me with Metro and the "kill switch".
March 16, 2012 6:26:24 AM

CaedenV said:
But if you disable it you won't be able to enjoy the new immersive and content rich programs that are designed for windows 8... you know.... like that finger painting thing... :) 

Jokes aside, I knew something was up when the metro interface popped up and the desktop tile was nowhere to be seen. My first thought was 'Oh, you have got to be kidding me... wait, there it is!" and I promptly moved it to the front of the list. After organizing it (Into Home which has control panel, desktop, e-mail, weather, and other 'useful' tiles, People, Games, Applications) then it started being a little more useful. I still think I will mostly use the desktop, but I find the new start screen at least a slight improvement over the old start menu that I hated for all these years.


I totally agree. After I organized the metro tiles a bit I find it much easier to get to the programs I need and want. I only wish we had a top level of tiles at the top of the screen for groups like we have in xBox.
March 18, 2012 7:45:39 AM

I believe that people are looking at Win 8 from the wrong angle. The metro interface is actually the Start Button. The way one goes back to the "Start Button" is to move the mouse cursor to the right hand edge of the screen and there is a Start option that takes the user back to the Metro interface. So simply move the mouse to the top right hand edge of the screen instead of clicking bottom left and you have a Start Menu. Instead of it being the finicky Start Menu we are all used to we now have another one that uses the whole screen and that is very easy to configure. You can change tile sizes and group them in a way you simply cant on the traditional desktop. Now add the fact that your customised interface will work well on the wide range of devices you may likely own such as tablet and smartphone. This setup is vastly superior to what we have worked with since 1995. Add the fact you can carry this OS on a USB stick and fire it on any modern PC and we are entering a whole new world of computing. MS have it right. I had my doubts but this time they have really taken us into a new world of computing.
March 19, 2012 8:44:27 PM

I installed on a spare 500 GB hard drive with nary a problem. After doing a little research on how to make it look and act like I want, it's really growing on me. I am strictly a desktop user. but am not only getting used to the Metro interface, but finding I prefer it to the desktop.

I agree with you, Wamphyri... I was never a big fan of the old Start button to begin with. Toss in the speed of the OS and my #1 favorite thing - NO RESTARTS FOR UPDATES!!! - and I'm finding I also agree with your last statement. I can definitely sympathize with the IT guys though - I did a bit of that at one time too. They speak true.
March 19, 2012 11:51:54 PM

I personally kinda like the idea of Metro. I don't like having to flip between UIs.
March 19, 2012 11:59:35 PM

Yes, there is definitely a schizophrenic feel to it right now. I'm hoping as the OS matures and they issue more updates, that will all be resolved.
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