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USB VHS to Dvd Converter

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May 30, 2007 7:00:27 AM

Greetings:

I was going to purchase an aiwx1900 for its converter capabilities but ran into a few problems for the upgrade, I have a bunch of VHS tapes I would like to copy to my computer then burn to dvd, can anyone recommend a good hardware/software program?


Edit- If it has a tv tuner as well.
Thanks,

More about : usb vhs dvd converter

May 30, 2007 8:32:44 AM

Lol, thats not technically legal if you're converting movies on VHS to dvd. But going from VHS to VHS is legal. But who the hell actually follows that crap. Anyway, any VIVO gfx card can accept an A/V connection. Most cards have this, you dont need a tuner to accomplish what you're going after. This will take a long time though, since the recording will be at a 1:1 ratio. Ask yourself if its worth it, because you're looking at alot of effort for saving about 15 bucks, or far less for the DVD version of the movie for retail or ebay, respectively. That aside, windows movie maker will operate well enough for you to capture video from your VCR onto your computer. Then its pretty simple from there to make a dvd of it.


These are family tapes right :p 


Edit: can't spell, fixed typo's
May 30, 2007 9:38:44 AM

Quote:
Lol, thats not technically legal if you're converting movies on VHS to dvd.



Wrong, but thanks for spreading nonsense.
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May 30, 2007 9:46:54 AM

You know up until a few years ago it was illegal to record TV programs onto VHS, at least in aus anyway. Funny, most people would never have known about it even and everyone did it.
May 30, 2007 10:42:01 AM

Easiest way is to use a DVD recorder. I have just done most of mine that way.
The only ones I could not do (Due to M********** protection) I did on a AMD2000/512RAM using an old Swann capture card. The software I used was iuLabs for capture and ConvertX to convert/burn. Worked great.
May 30, 2007 1:18:07 PM

actually "I", if its a copyrighted vhs, i believe its still illegal to copy them to dvd in the us.
May 30, 2007 5:05:34 PM

As long as your not copying the VHS to DVD with the intent to sell the DVD's I think your safe. But until the Copy police are banging down my door I'll do what I want with my stuff. ;-)
May 30, 2007 10:21:27 PM

I. No i'm not incorrect. Look up the laws on phonorecords. You cant convert a cassette tape to cd, and neither can you convert a VHS to DVD. Thanks for calling me out to be wrong and not backing up what you say with any references.

When you try to copy a vhs to another media you bypass the macrovision copy protection within the tape or dvd. Bypassing this is considered a violation of DMCA so as of 2001 you arent legally allowd to backup copyrighted media into another format. You can backup DVD's you own, so long as you leave all copy protections intact.

Here is where you will find you are wholey incorrect in your statement. Next time back up what you say instead of blindly calling someone else wrong.

Now, as I said before, though it is technically illegal to convert a vhs to dvd format, since the MPAA decided they own the formats for each inclusively, the process is easy. Follow my instructions as I stated before and you should be sitting pretty.

Any non copy protected VHS will work flawlessly, however you will need to get a program that bypasses macrovision in vhs. This is why its not as simple as owning two vcr's to copy vhs, you need a descrambler of some kind to properly hook up the two together.

Anything to say to that I?
May 30, 2007 11:29:35 PM

I did the same thing you are doing a while ago I used a pinnacle product I don't remember which one though, and I am not home to check. It came with the hardware and software and work extremely well for me they are at www.pinnaclesys.com
May 31, 2007 5:06:29 AM

Quote:
actually "I", if its a copyrighted vhs, i believe its still illegal to copy them to dvd in the us.


You can believe what you like but that doesn't make it true.
May 31, 2007 5:27:37 AM

Quote:
When you try to copy a vhs to another media you bypass the macrovision copy protection within the tape or dvd.


Doesn't matter. In fact dual desk VCRs were made for this purpose. You can't take effort to circumvent but if you just make a copy without the overt effort to actively defeat a measure and it works, you have a fair-use copy.

Quote:
Bypassing this is considered a violation of DMCA so as of 2001 you arent legally allowd to backup copyrighted media into another format.


Wrong, that's "bypassing" in an active sense not passive.

Quote:
You can backup DVD's you own, so long as you leave all copy protections intact.


There is no issue of "leave all copy protections intact" because if you have altered it, it isn't any longer a backup.

Quote:
Here is where you will find you are wholey incorrect in your statement. Next time back up what you say instead of blindly calling someone else wrong.


You're wrong.
... and Macrovision isn't some secret thing that needs a link, has been around for quite a while.

Two key things you fail to understand are:

1) You may not have macrovision interfering with duping it, no circumvention issue.
2) a wiki is not a reliable source of information. In fact it's quite likely a biased article since fair use standards have been maintained for quite a while.

Automatic Gain control, that it exists, does not inherantly mean you are both A) not able to copy without hacking something B) having it actually prevent copying something for fair use.

Also on your linked wiki it is stated " the sale, purchase, or manufacture of any device that has no commercial purpose other than disabling Macrovision copy prevention was made illegal" which does not rule out products that DO have a commercial purpose other than disabling.

Quote:
Now, as I said before, though it is technically illegal to convert a vhs to dvd format,

No it is not technically illegal. Consider there are probably 100+ ways to illegally gain $400, but that does not make ALL ways of gaining $400, illegal. Your argument was logically flawed.

The copying is legal. The only thing illegal is if you happen upon something interfering and try to circumvent (or sell). Since you don't want to learn I'm not going to give you a list of ways it's still possible to do the former without the latter.

Quote:
since the MPAA decided they own the formats for each inclusively,


For each what? VHS? Did you see that on a wiki too?


Quote:
Anything to say to that I?


Sure, you're calling the wrong thing illegal. It's not the copy it's the method.
May 31, 2007 5:30:41 AM

Not replying to anyone in particular, but honestly, who cares? The cops ought to fix the illegal downloading of music before worrying about this.
May 31, 2007 5:33:58 AM

Quote:
Not replying to anyone in particular, but honestly, who cares? The cops ought to fix the illegal downloading of music before worrying about this.


If by fixing it you mean breaking up the monopolies so it's an open market, I agree. If you mean using our justice system to aid an industry that already overstepped their bounds and needs restrained, I'll disagree. I'm not saying piracy is ok, I'm saying fix the problem not just the result.
May 31, 2007 5:38:41 AM

I second using a stand alone DVD recorder.

In my experiences, using a computer will involve some sort of encoding and decoding of the signal... This slows up the process.

a stand alone unit is just about as easy to use as copying from VCR to VCR (unless you are splicing movie clips)

ps. I use these for a home based business and not for copyrighted material... I have no idea if any protections exist that may or may not be a problem
May 31, 2007 5:40:02 AM

I was actually satirising the situation (although it wasnt clear). Yes music companies are making money any way they can as do all corporations. The thing is, no one is doing anything about it and worrying about petty issues like this topic.
May 31, 2007 8:21:50 AM

Well you seem knowledgible in the area so I'll leave it at that. My argument is based off of the same reasoning the RIAA doesnt allow users to legally convert a cassette tape to CD, for whatever reasons. I made an assumption the MPAA thought the same, which is why I assume we cant trade in all of our old VHS's for the DVD format of the exact same movie. That, as far as my reasoning is concerned, is why it would be questionable that any person could freely change formats of the media they obtained to any formats owned by the MPAA/RIAA. That is, copying a VHS so it works in a DVD player seems to circumvent the copy protection of the DVD by not incorporating it alltogether. Do I back the RIAA or MPAA, **** no! Am I cautioning a forum member to what his actions could lead him to? Yes. Asking in a public area how break any law, as stupid as it might be, should be informed of what exactly he/she may be getting into.

Quote:
Doesn't matter. In fact dual desk VCRs were made for this purpose. You can't take effort to circumvent but if you just make a copy without the overt effort to actively defeat a measure and it works, you have a fair-use copy.


They are professional 8 head vcr's used for the purpose of copying VHS's, the same reason other professionals involved in the fabrication process have tools beyond what you or I can purchase at Best Buy.

Quote:
No it is not technically illegal. Consider there are probably 100+ ways to illegally gain $400, but that does not make ALL ways of gaining $400, illegal. Your argument was logically flawed.


It isnt flawed actually. You're comparing the 400.00 to the wrong thing, the 400.00 isnt the copying process, its the legality of said process. So really the statement should be, "there are many ways of making 400.00, stealing isnt one of them".

Quote:
For each what? VHS? Did you see that on a wiki too?


Yes, for every single copyrighted VHS. Just like music CD's and so on. The only reason we can copy cd's to our computer is because the RIAA didnt claim any particular media in that format, so it was fair game for all. They snoozed, and they losed.

Any copying of phonorecords for the distribution or unauthorized personal use is against the DMCA 2001. Feel free to read the whole dammed thing, I'm off to bed. You made some good points, but I'm not kept up at night because I backup my movies to my computer. The copy protection can kiss my a$$, the only reason i ever brough up the legality of it was for the OP's own sake.

I want to believe it perfectly legal, but its not, we all have our fair share of "backups" and "purchased" mp3's. In canada its a gray area since there is no DMCA here, however my American friends can and will have to be a little more discreet about his/her copying nature.

To reitterate, I'm not arguing with you I, at this point you can see we agree on it, as I don't see you contending what is illegal, but we seem to be in contention about the means. Aside from that minor point, I see us as in agreement. The continuation of this parlay will not aid in the OP's question. I suggest that we assist him, and PM each other if we still have issues.

Thank you


WOOT 300th post! :p 
May 31, 2007 9:57:05 AM

Ahuramazda,
There are several Stand alone products available at most major Electronics stores. They are often under $100 and include basic Editing software. Dazzle makes several inexpensive capture devices that should fit the bill. Look for them at Best Buy etc.

If you notice your picture going black then back to normal, that would be the Crappy, Cheesey, Macrovision Copy Protection kicking in. It basically removes the Sync singnal for the picture. It lowers the picture quality a bit too. Some devices will not work with Macrovision. Some devices create a new Sync Signal and will ignore it. If you do run into Macrovision issues, buy a "Picture Enchancer", (it will have a dozen different names). It should describe itself as a device that enhances the picture. (It does, it will restore/cleanup Sync Signal issues). They are like $50.

Going off subject a bit:

Wikipedia is not a reliable source of information on Any subject that has questionable motives. Macrovision certainly is active changing any entries on WIKI. DMCA is a piece of garbage, Fair Use was challenged many times prior to it, but we really have not seen the end of court battles on that.

Personally, if your backing up something you own, and are not Giving Away or Selling it, who cares? ( i.e. if I rip a song off my Dark Side of the Moon album, then put it on my thumb drive so I can listen to it in my car or at work ect, I don't think there is anything Morally wrong with it. Passing copies of it out to my friends is something different... in my opinion).

Sluggo
May 31, 2007 1:53:29 PM

ok so here is the thing. vhs was before the whole, people only lease the right to use the material, they dont own it. however, DMCA laws say that if you bypass any form of copy protection, you are breaking the law. macrovision is a copy protection method. it is legal to copy vhs videos you have made to dvd, but not if the vhs is copy protected. even tho you bought the vhs tape, you bought the video to be used on the vhs, not a dvd. you do not own the rights to the video, so you cannot change the format. with things like music now, you dont even own the song, you have the rights to use the song. but here is the thing, unless you are copying thousands of vhs tapes to dvd, nobody is really going to mess with you. now if you start trying to sell the dvds, then your in trouble. vhs saves the video as a signal, dvd is digital. by changeing the format, you are changeing the video, thus breaking the law.
here is a link to the dmca laws.

http://www.copyright.gov/legislation/dmca.pdf
May 31, 2007 2:48:33 PM

All this copyright talk... did anyone actually answer the original posters question?

Plextor and Turtlebeach both have some products that received good reviews. Either of those should do you well.
May 31, 2007 3:02:01 PM

sorry, got cought up in the flame.
usb usually isint very good, its better to go with a card. the only usb ones ive seen that might be good are really expensive. go for the pci card. there not that hard to install anyway. im looking at getting one.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

the problem is that when you convert over to dvd, they quality is only going to be as good as the vhs you got it from.

side note. any reply that you get from mpilchfamily, is probably going to be the best answer your going to get.
May 31, 2007 5:23:58 PM

Thank you all for your replies, interesting reads, I need a USB because my computer only has 2 pci slots both used. Maybe a stand alone would be better for me.

In regards to the copyright, just to elaborate my needs, I have a digest of TV shows and war coverage from the initial Irag war and a mishmash of Ms3tk I would like to preserve.

Thanks,
May 31, 2007 6:03:59 PM

Quote:
Greetings:

I was going to purchase an aiwx1900 for its converter capabilities but ran into a few problems for the upgrade, I have a bunch of VHS tapes I would like to copy to my computer then burn to dvd, can anyone recommend a good hardware/software program?


Edit- If it has a tv tuner as well.
Thanks,


I've used a combination of things I already had to convert my VHS tapes to DVD (most had Mac***ision as well). I used:

1) WinTV PVR USB2 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
2) BeyondTV http://www.snapstream.com
3) TMPGEnc DVD Author http://tmpgenc.pegasys-inc.com/en/product/tda3.html

which in combination took about 20 minutes longer than the length of the movie for the tota conversion (burning to DVD included). Note that PVR software is included with the tuner, so that's not really required. However, BeyondTV is easier to use.

I'm sure there are easier ways too.
December 28, 2008 2:08:53 AM

Its always been legal to copy anything for personal backup only.
In the case of VHS if you own or created the original recording, ie; u bought the original movie or you taped your kids, you own the capability to view it as you see fit.
That includes converting the format to continue using it...

As a person who has been in the biz, as long as its personal use backup, there is not illegality.
Anybody who says otherwise is wrong.

In my own case, about half of my vhs is stuff I could find dvd's for, so I might not convert them at all.
But the other half are either personally mine or a tapes of recordings that will never see dvd ever.
I have vhs copies of tv shows (fillers) that have not been archived/dvd'd or otherwise ever recorded for sale by the originators or the owners.
But those will still be personal use only...

Fortunately the simple act of copying from VHS to DVD is not illegal.

Btw, the above comment about copying to VHS never has applied to archiving or backing up ones collection. Never has.
And that has always been the out that questionable people used.... But still it is the way to legitimately copy most stuff even now.
December 28, 2008 11:56:41 AM



Soley in the case of backup or archiving, it has never been illegal to copy anything and it was challenged pretty much at each new way to store anything..

That is also according to the same sources listed in this forum and also according to the courts.
In terms of protecting my purchases by having copies of it, this will always be done.

Since it is legal to archive/copy stuff.. Much of the copyright info while valid is relevant, only if one is not backup/archiving their stuff. (ie; copying to distribute or sell or trade is illegal and can be and does get proscecuted).
August 28, 2009 2:11:39 AM

Can someone tell me, then, if the following statement is (or is not) true in the US?

"Making copies of copyrighted video material is covered under the
Fair Use provisions in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law. As long as you own
the video material, and you don't plan on selling the resulting DVD, it's perfectly
legal. It's also legal for a 3rd party (like us) to make the conversion for you. In
1984 the Supreme Court held that time-shifting (for example, private, non-
commercial home taping of television programs with a VCR to permit later
viewing) and archiving (making a backup copy of a VHS tape you purchased) is
fair use. (Ref. Sony Corporation of America v. Universal City Studios, 464 U.S.
417 (1984, S.C.)."
!