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Fun & Games with Sharp Aquos 45 inch LCD television

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Anonymous
January 19, 2005 7:06:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

We purchased a Sharp Aquos LC-45GD6U for display of on-air and
cable/satellite television, DVD media, and HTPC (Home Theater Personal
Computer) output including graphic and alphanumeric data.
The Sharp has a native resolution of 1920 x 1080 and high definition
television images are impressive. Text is not as clear as with a good
quality computer monitor due to a very significant difference in pixel
density, but it is usable especially when the Aquos is viewed from a
distance of several feet.
There are a confusing number of Aquos models. Most consist of different
speaker placements, but there is also the important option of having an
integral or separate receiver. The separate configuration has several
important advantages: wall mounting is easier due to differences in
cabling and weight, you can connect DVI data directly to the display and
avoid the integral's unfortunate HDCP and resolution limitations,
service on the separate receiver is easier compared with the integral
unit, and it is possible to leave the receiver on and to turn off the
display, a useful feature if one is listening to cable/satellite
digitized music.
Connecting a computer to the Aquos is an interesting experience. There
is a DVI input, but, for totally unknown reasons, its resolution is
limited to 1280 x 1024. The only digital connection that provides native
resolution is the single HDMI input. It will accept 1920 x 1080
resolution if the computer's video adapter is HDMI and HDCP compliant.
Crucial's Radeon x800 card does meet the copy protection requirements
and will work with the Aquos. There are not, however, many video
adapters that have the required hardware and software driver capabilities.
Unless you want to frequently change HDMI cable connections, you need a
Gefen or equivalent digital switch so that a DVD player, satellite
receiver, or other digital device can be easily switched to the single
HDMI input.
There is a frustrating problem if you use the cable card option for
input of digital cable data. There is only one radio frequency input for
digital television. You can use the cable card or an antenna, but not
both for radio frequency digital data. Switching between the two isn't
easy because you have to change both the coaxial cables and the
programming for each switch between on the on air and cable digital.
Implementation of a DVR requires an external box. This consideration
plus the cable card headaches mean that the you really need an external
receiver for cable or satellite connections.
The Aquos has an interesting digital audio output. It provides digital
audio for both digital and analog television. The latter requires an
analog to digital conversion and, unlike many systems, the Aquos does this.
Digital video is a different issue. There is a Firewire output, but this
only works with a D-VCR. The MPAA and FCC seem to be determined to make
it as difficult as possible to either transmit or store graphic data.
There is a "wonderful" new concept of a Roach Motel or Hotel California
meaning that digital optical data systems will be designed so that
information can be entered but not removed (You can check in, but not
check out).
It would certainly be nice to have a MPEG-2 or MPEG-4 output that could
be transmitted via Firewire to a computer or other digital devices, but
this doesn't exist, at least in the USA.

Robbie
January 20, 2005 2:31:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I have a question for you...
why have you payed a 45" LCD when some plasma TV are cheaper?
what are the criteria behind your choice?

I have tested the Aquaos 30", but I have returned the product. Maybe the
contrast ratio of 500:1 (instead-of 800:1 on new model) is the cause of my
complain:
I have a lot of problems to setup correctly the colors.

Is it a great difference between 500:1 and 800:1?

Also, viewing standard TV without digital decoder does not provides a good
quality.
Have you tested this?

Samsung start the production of new LCD screens for computers with a better
response time (8ms instead-of 16ms for actual models). Does this type of
technology is also used today in LCD TV?
And does it better to wait a little to see these new technologies?

thanks for your answers and knowledge sharing :-)


"Robbie" <robbiex@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:NVzHd.68733$zy6.59749@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
> We purchased a Sharp Aquos LC-45GD6U for display of on-air and
> cable/satellite television, DVD media, and HTPC (Home Theater Personal
> Computer) output including graphic and alphanumeric data.
> The Sharp has a native resolution of 1920 x 1080 and high definition
> television images are impressive. Text is not as clear as with a good
> quality computer monitor due to a very significant difference in pixel
> density, but it is usable especially when the Aquos is viewed from a
> distance of several feet.
> There are a confusing number of Aquos models. Most consist of different
> speaker placements, but there is also the important option of having an
> integral or separate receiver. The separate configuration has several
> important advantages: wall mounting is easier due to differences in
> cabling and weight, you can connect DVI data directly to the display and
> avoid the integral's unfortunate HDCP and resolution limitations, service
> on the separate receiver is easier compared with the integral unit, and it
> is possible to leave the receiver on and to turn off the display, a useful
> feature if one is listening to cable/satellite digitized music.
> Connecting a computer to the Aquos is an interesting experience. There is
> a DVI input, but, for totally unknown reasons, its resolution is limited
> to 1280 x 1024. The only digital connection that provides native
> resolution is the single HDMI input. It will accept 1920 x 1080 resolution
> if the computer's video adapter is HDMI and HDCP compliant. Crucial's
> Radeon x800 card does meet the copy protection requirements and will work
> with the Aquos. There are not, however, many video adapters that have the
> required hardware and software driver capabilities.
> Unless you want to frequently change HDMI cable connections, you need a
> Gefen or equivalent digital switch so that a DVD player, satellite
> receiver, or other digital device can be easily switched to the single
> HDMI input.
> There is a frustrating problem if you use the cable card option for input
> of digital cable data. There is only one radio frequency input for digital
> television. You can use the cable card or an antenna, but not both for
> radio frequency digital data. Switching between the two isn't easy because
> you have to change both the coaxial cables and the programming for each
> switch between on the on air and cable digital.
> Implementation of a DVR requires an external box. This consideration plus
> the cable card headaches mean that the you really need an external
> receiver for cable or satellite connections.
> The Aquos has an interesting digital audio output. It provides digital
> audio for both digital and analog television. The latter requires an
> analog to digital conversion and, unlike many systems, the Aquos does
> this.
> Digital video is a different issue. There is a Firewire output, but this
> only works with a D-VCR. The MPAA and FCC seem to be determined to make it
> as difficult as possible to either transmit or store graphic data. There
> is a "wonderful" new concept of a Roach Motel or Hotel California meaning
> that digital optical data systems will be designed so that information can
> be entered but not removed (You can check in, but not check out).
> It would certainly be nice to have a MPEG-2 or MPEG-4 output that could be
> transmitted via Firewire to a computer or other digital devices, but this
> doesn't exist, at least in the USA.
>
> Robbie
Anonymous
January 20, 2005 4:21:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

There are strengths and weaknesses of each of the digital TV
technologies. There is a good discussion of LCD and plasma at:
http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-8900_7-5120008-1.html?tag=...

We chose The Sharp 45" LCD for its native resolution of 1920 x 1080,
bright image and minimal burn in problems. The plasmas are less
expensive and have better gray/black imaging. They do suffer from
burn-in problems and, at least at the time of our purchase, there were
no known consumer level plasmas with 1920 x 1080 native resolution.

Robbie
Anonymous
January 25, 2005 7:29:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hi Robbie,

Like you I bought the Sharp 45" LCD. And, using just Powerstrip was
able to get it to 1920 x 1200, and although it was a bit underscanned
horizontally (there was a black border on both sides), and a bit
overscanned vertically (I couldn't see the task bar) - things looked
great. I did this by playing around with the clock frequency under the
"Fine Sync." option in "Setup" in the Aquos menu.

However, I had to reformat my computer, and lost the Powerstrip
settings for this. I realize my set up is a bit different: I was
simply using a 9200 ati mobility (in an HP zt3000 laptop), and I used a
VGA to DVI converter - not HDMI. Do you mind posting the Powerstrip
settings you are using?

You mentioned you were using a Crucial x800 video card - what timings
are you using to get to 1920 x 1080p?
Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
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