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OMG CASE MODE FOR REAL

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June 5, 2007 11:18:21 AM

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/622993/new_generation_of_...

how much cooling do you guys think the mineral oil would bring down the temps?! If the benefits are rewarding then we might as well all use mineral oil than the loud fans I'm using.

More about : omg case mode real

June 5, 2007 11:29:20 AM

It works, and highly refined mineral oil has been used for cooling high power transformers for a long time, but for a pc it's a stupid idea. You would have to make the case leak free for one, which is harder then it sounds. Also, think about the mess if the case sprung a leak, or you wanted to change a component, or if the case tipped over somehow. The thing would be so heavy that you would have to drain the oil whenever you moved it, even if it's just across the room. Oil cooling a pc just isnt practical.

Oh, and this has been posted in one form or another countless times here.
June 5, 2007 1:39:39 PM

I wouldn't mind seeing a setup like this complete with some rads and an active cooling system for the oil. Would love to know what the max OC one could get on this sucker would be. Someone should try doing this with a SFF case. Just to see how portable it would be. Just my two copper though.
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June 5, 2007 2:38:15 PM

I think the point was to make it look like you had your computer in the water, but I could see the fans wearing out being a big issue.
June 5, 2007 5:20:00 PM

i'd totally just get some wicked high cfm fans and make a whirl pool so they wouldn't work as hard and the cooling would be better... and maybe just dump the stuff in a circular tank instead of in a square one... maybe put some of thoes gay little fish tank castles in it? hahaha... i wonder what the burning point of that oil is?
June 5, 2007 5:28:11 PM

Quote:
i'd totally just get some wicked high cfm fans and make a whirl pool so they wouldn't work as hard and the cooling would be better... and maybe just dump the stuff in a circular tank instead of in a square one... maybe put some of thoes gay little fish tank castles in it? hahaha... i wonder what the burning point of that oil is?


Add some little plastic fishys that will float in the middle and some of those fish tank pebbles and you've got something someone will go bug eyed at.
June 5, 2007 6:07:55 PM

Quote:
i'd totally just get some wicked high cfm fans and make a whirl pool so they wouldn't work as hard and the cooling would be better... and maybe just dump the stuff in a circular tank instead of in a square one... maybe put some of thoes gay little fish tank castles in it? hahaha... i wonder what the burning point of that oil is?


the whirlpool isnt a bad idea.
June 5, 2007 10:51:10 PM

Most pure mineral oil's flash point is around 190-230 degrees Celcius, although it's risky to bring some of the stuff above 120 C. It's not something you're likely to come across in a computer environment. That said, it is a major danger if it does happen, since mineral oil burns fairly well.
June 6, 2007 12:22:03 AM

you could have a pc that also makes french fries. you would be the coolest kid on the block.
June 6, 2007 1:07:21 AM

Posted this awhile back, the original thread is Too cool to be true, Mineral Oil Submerged PC!

And the original link to the real webpage is here.

Read the posts on there as it addresses pretty much all the questions and things mentioned here regarding the heat of the processor and what not.
June 7, 2007 3:16:25 AM

Quote:
Posted this awhile back, the original thread is Too cool to be true, Mineral Oil Submerged PC!

And the original link to the real webpage is here.

Read the posts on there as it addresses pretty much all the questions and things mentioned here regarding the heat of the processor and what not.


If I had the money I would do this. Add a radiator and It would probably do great for cooling.
June 7, 2007 6:05:16 PM

well thats next, try to modify a car radiator to cool a mineral oiled computer :D 

or a turbocharger intercooler would do the same job.

but as pionted out, the thing would weigh a ton!
June 7, 2007 7:02:30 PM

just need long copper tubing that you can coil up, add a fan over it, put a pump in the middle, mount it to the back (with some space to breath) and stick the cool end to the bottom and the hot end over the top, and there you go. Yes, it would be expensive, but if mounted right won't put any weight on the tank.

Besides with a tank like that your not going to move your computer anyways.
June 8, 2007 11:58:58 AM

the reason i wanted to know about the flash point is if something shorted out or burnt up... or maybe you know when you get static build up... would it light from a little jump from your finger grounding out? that and the dude submerged the psu... the components on those can sometimes get very hot... especially if there's a short... (eg, ever smell your stereo system fry? power amps are finicky) but in theory I like the idea...

and yes, the whirl pool idea is a good idea. :-p haha. thanx
June 8, 2007 12:23:07 PM

The boiling point and flash point of mineral oil is high enough you'd never hit it no matter how much heat your generating from your pc.
June 8, 2007 1:31:05 PM

I wouldn't be worried about the pc components... it's just that if somthing shorted...
June 8, 2007 2:24:19 PM

Quote:
I wouldn't be worried about the pc components... it's just that if somthing shorted.


if your worried about sparking a fire from a short just remember that fire needs O2 to spark and if the case is filled with oil that can't happen
June 8, 2007 3:01:59 PM

so as long as you keep the components below the top of the oil then a short wouldn't even cause a problem. I wonder though, how often would you have to change the oil? I know it wouldn't be as often a vegetable oil, but don't most oils eventually break down?
June 8, 2007 9:40:19 PM

put a fish tank filter on it... then it would keep the dust out of it
June 8, 2007 9:53:27 PM

You won't have to worry about dust if at the top you use some type of sealing lid. And it will help to keep people from sticking appendages in there or other things. :p 
June 8, 2007 10:14:44 PM

dirt gets everywhere... i'd still put a filter on it... even if you're using brand new parts... and i was thinking, how is this going to affect the actual pcb... is that material going to soak up the oil and warp?

I bet everything slides into the slots nice and easy! haha... and another great advantage to this is that the WHOLE PC is utilizing liquid cooling... not just parts with heat sinks on em...
June 8, 2007 10:22:05 PM

the best part about it, other then the install of the radiator, there is no tubing to worry about when installing the hardware.
June 9, 2007 8:02:47 PM

i lke the idea, and firstly it cools much better than air, water is 27X better than air, Oil more so (hence frying fans). i think THG used a CNPS 7700 cu with ou the fan instead of force the fan around, that way the heat is still beeing take.

you wouldnt need a raditor because of convection, the hot would rise, and only sink when cool
June 9, 2007 8:37:05 PM

The problem with submerged oil cooling is lack of circulation. Modern chips and their sockets are simply too tiny for oil to penetrate and then circulate. Hot spots can develop as a result of tiny air pockets behind components, and the result is premature death of the motherboard and/or CPU.
June 9, 2007 9:15:58 PM

Has anybody thought of looking for an oil pump of some type, I know they have to exist. Normal fan motors would wear out, and water pumps wear out too, because of the Viscosity of the oil.
June 10, 2007 3:01:33 AM

if you could install this then install your boards submerged... and spend some time fiddling with the bubbles (i don't think you'd have to worry about it, heat transferes from air to oil too.) there is a VERY EFFECTIVE way to cool said mineral oil... but i'm not disclosing my thought process in this forum until/if i have come to a feasible conclusion... if you think about it for a while you'll be like "omg that is sooo freaking obvious and sooo homebrewable!" hahah. :-p

oh yeah, and just get low viscosity oil... i see this as a possible trend in the near future... but not for your average "off the line" pc.

if you thinking what i'm thinking.. send me a pm and we'll find a financial backer... I already have half the case designed in my head. :-p
June 10, 2007 9:25:30 AM

MINIFRIDGE FTW LOL
June 10, 2007 1:33:34 PM

err.. feasible but no. that's not what i was thinking... minifridge won't run on it's back... unless you wanted to seal the front up and cut a door out of the top... and even then, that wouldn't have neat windows. :-p
June 10, 2007 2:45:34 PM

I have an acrylic case and I'm very tempted to give this a go, my concern is will the oil get in and warp my board? And it'd be a permanent mod basically cuz trying to get that stuff off afterwards just wouldn't happen...
June 10, 2007 2:46:02 PM

I have an acrylic case and I'm very tempted to give this a go, my concern is will the oil get in and warp my board? And it'd be a permanent mod basically cuz trying to get that stuff off afterwards just wouldn't happen...
June 10, 2007 2:46:28 PM

Now you have me thinking more about this. It would require a strong clear plastic or still the fish tank.
June 10, 2007 4:08:07 PM

The componets used in mobo, ram, HD, PSU etc. are not specifically tested for general material compatibility. It is an issue with oils like mineral oil. Some plastics will have accelerated stress crack, or similar advanced aging that may cause the components to break down in strange ways. I doubt there's been much testing for these components in this respect.
June 10, 2007 9:46:49 PM

I think oil would prolly be good for the plastic... you know, so it doesn't dry out.. i'm just worried about the pcb and what it's permeability.... maybe we should try using some turtle wax stuff that you put on your cars dash board... clear armorall or somthing, haha.
June 10, 2007 10:01:48 PM

my point is that oil is not aways good for plastics in addition to other materials. For example, some plastics including types of polyurethanes will swell after long-term contact with mineral oil.

Another thing to consider, long-term absorbsion of the oil in pourous materials (mobo?). These items swell and cause all kinds of issues?

I'd like to see one of these systems after 90 days of running.
June 10, 2007 10:03:31 PM

Mineral oil

:\

they should of went with Vaseline


( :wink: )
June 10, 2007 10:50:31 PM

It would be great to test something like that though. Over clock it to the point were it won't kill everything by itself and then run it for about a year and see how the system fairs. If after a year there is no sign of were and tare, then it would probably have a small market for it.
June 11, 2007 2:49:14 PM

if you think that a cirtain part is going to swell... just coat it with laqour... a perfect tool for the job would be clear nail polish (just steal some from your mom or sister , haha) or even just go get some of that uv reactive stuff they have and make your case look cool to boot.... get it? boot? hahahha (ok, it wasn't funny)

anyway, yeah, i think if you put some clear laqour in places you think needed to be sealed up it would help a bit... becuse the top and bottom of the board are pretty much sealed by what's printed on it... maybe just coat the chips in the stuff (and it'll still transfer heat relatively well) then you wouldn't have to worry as much. or just use spray on silicone (like the stuff you buy at the shoe store for your leather stuff)
!