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Video edit on 64 bit hardware

Last response: in Windows XP
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July 8, 2009 1:33:10 AM


I have set up the 64 bit computer; (hardware and OS are both 64 bit).
BUT... The main software I wanted to load for video editing (Adobe CS4 Production Premium) was expecting a 32 Bit OS. (I've lost my hair) :ouch: 

Ironically, Adobe only coded the software to work on the Vista 64 bit OS and the popular 32 bit OS's. (Doesn't make sense to me; why only Vista??? What about XP Pro 64 bit) :o  :pt1cable: 

Anyhow, I know I can install XP 32 bit on a secondary partition and then install the video editing programs.

OR

Use WOW64 to emulate a 32 bit system, but I don't believe this to be a practical and efficient solution.


MY QUESTION:
Once the video editing software is installed and using a 32 bit OS, would I run into driver problems between the 32 bit software and the 64 bit hardware?

Thank you for your input.
July 8, 2009 2:49:13 AM

Apologies... I reread your post and the white paper. You are spot on supports 32 bit XP and 32 or 64 bit Vista.

It does seem backwards!
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July 8, 2009 6:08:36 PM

Thanks for double checking on the compatibility. :) 

Still searching for a firm answer on whether or not I could expect driver problems.
August 16, 2009 6:09:30 PM

h8ids said:
Thanks for double checking on the compatibility. :) 

Still searching for a firm answer on whether or not I could expect driver problems.


Running 32 bit XP or Vista on a 64 bit machine isn't a problem. The OS determines driver compatibility. AMD created their 64 bit processors to be backward compatible with the x86 standard and Intel followed suite when they released their consumer their 64 bit CPUs. Keep in mind there is a difference between Intel's consumer line and their I64 processors. 64 bit Pentiums, Celerons, Core 2s and CoreI7s are all Intel's consumer grade 64 bit products. They all allow 32 bit XP and Vista to run as if they were installed on 32 bit hardware and have the same driver compatibility (again... based on the OS, rather then the hardware).

Just remember, 32 bit XP (and Vista) has a memory max of about 3.6 GB. As such, no matter how much RAM you stuff under the hood, the OS will only recognize and use up to that limit.

On the Premier vs 64 bit XP issue. XP and Vista share many things, however, one of their more distinct differences is in their audio and video subsystems. When Adobe released their newest incarnation of Premier, it stands to reason they'd make it compatible with 32 bit XP since the installed base is so huge. Since Vista is Microsoft's current OS, it stands to reason they'd make Premier compatible with both the 32 and 64 bit versions of that. However, 64 bit XP (in numbers) remains a niche OS. As such, I can see that Adobe might not have any great concern for those users. The idea being that is you want 64 bit Premier, you have to install 64 bit Vista. I'm not saying it's fair to the XP users, just that from a marketing/programming point of view, it makes sense.
!