Effect of battery backup ups on m/b,pwr supply?

Since the ups (APC 1500va-865w) puts out a square sine wave I was wondering if/how it can effect the m/b electronics? I'm getting a NF68 A1 and plan on o'clocking a E-6600.
Would it be better to plug in my computer to the non-regulated wall socket power or the ups?
My PSU is an 850w PowerPC&Cooling.
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  1. I can't address your specific set up, but I have used a similar UPS for 3 yrs now. I think it's much better than running off wall current - eliminates the spikes/surges and acts as a power conditioner. But, my PSU is only 500w.
  2. I don't know if I'm misunderstanding your question or not but I would guest you'd want your PC plugged into the UPS, right?
    I've run across several different UPS being implemented: some sitting right next to the PC. I would NOT recommend putting it next to the PC. If you can get it about 2 feet away from the UPS, you should be ok.
    I think UPS might cause problems with CAT5 cable so don't go wrappin your cable around the battery.
  3. If your SmartUps puts out a square wave, RMA it...
  4. Only if you have really good wall socket that never spikes or browns...

    You could put an extra power conditioner after the UPS before the computer. The APC has some in it already.
  5. I have an APC Back-ups 750 with the data-to-usb port attached to my Vista 32. I also have a PCP&C, but a 750 quad. Played with OC and got my E6600 to around 3.4 on air. But everything is stock now... need it stable 24/7.
    I have my APC right behind my PC and never had any problems - I dont have my Cat5 cable wrap'd around it but it sits close to it. No problems getting my 10mb down & 1mb upload via my Cable modem.

    Only odd thing I had happen started about a week ago. Found my PC off, booted back up and it resumed like from Hibernate – log said battery reported empty and widows saved the session or something like that… Did it again randomly 2 more times… so I looked into it last night – found an out-of-date driver on my mouse, and installed APC’s Vista version of their management software… We’ll see how she runs now.
  6. Thank you all for your input. My concern was with the redundant power corrections: 1. in the ups itself of course;2. in the power supply itself and
    3. The 6 phase power correction on the motherboard itself.
    And I believe the power corrected output from the UPS is a square wave sine output verse a sineusodial wave form.
    My ups is at least 2ft away from the computer.
    I have always plugged my computer into the regulated socket on the ups but had a few problems with the PC before I upgraded it like vid cards going bad and loosing the built in GigByte lan ports. It just crossed my mind about all
    the "redundant pwr corrections" and was wondering about the possible negitive effect this MIGHT have??
  7. Check with PSU website if OK to run with that UPS. Since there are a lot of these out there, I expect it is fine. There will be no effect on motherboard as PSU produces regulated DC. If you plug computer into non U output there is no point in having the UPS at all. PSU is designed to take 120/220V 50/60Hz input and produce various stable DC voltages. Why do you think there is a problem?

    Mike.
  8. Quote:
    Thank you all for your input. My concern was with the redundant power corrections: 1. in the ups itself of course;2. in the power supply itself and
    3. The 6 phase power correction on the motherboard itself.
    And I believe the power corrected output from the UPS is a square wave sine output verse a sineusodial wave form.
    My ups is at least 2ft away from the computer.
    I have always plugged my computer into the regulated socket on the ups but had a few problems with the PC before I upgraded it like vid cards going bad and loosing the built in GigByte lan ports. It just crossed my mind about all
    the "redundant pwr corrections" and was wondering about the possible negitive effect this MIGHT have??


    It wastes power. That is all. You can string as many power regulators together as you want without hurting your computer.

    Inverters don't create smooth AC current but they aren't necessarily completely square. The one in your APC will do something like produce 120v then
    100, then
    80, then
    60
    40,
    20,
    0,
    -20,
    -40,
    -80,
    -100,
    -120,
    -100
    etc to smooth it out a little bit. Each voltage change would create right-angles if you were to watch it on an ocilliscope (ie. "square" angles) where AC current from a true AC power source such as a magneto generator would be a continuous wave. So don't plug analogue media amplifiers into it (ex: TV, Stereo) or you'll probably get static but going into a power converter like your computer's PSU it should be just fine.
  9. Quote:
    Check with PSU website if OK to run with that UPS. Since there are a lot of these out there, I expect it is fine. There will be no effect on motherboard as PSU produces regulated DC. If you plug computer into non U output there is no point in having the UPS at all. PSU is designed to take 120/220V 50/60Hz input and produce various stable DC voltages. Why do you think there is a problem?

    Mike.

    Not sure if it IS a problem..that's why I'm asking.
    Seems not to be a problem according to the posts here..thanks.
  10. Thanks for the explenation Flasher702. Guess I won't worry about it any more.

    Mike-I'll try your good suggestion and try PC Power&Cooling and see if they have anything to say on the subject..Thanks again.
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