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Decreasing Room Temperature

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June 9, 2007 11:59:28 PM

I'm planning on building a new high end machine when the next Intel price drops hit in July. However, I want to try to solve a problem that I tend to have regarding machines in my room. I currently have a P4 system that generates a lot of heat. I'm not so much concerned with the heat inside my case as I am the ambient temperature in my room! My computer heats my room up significantly.

When I build my new system, I would like to eliminate this problem. What effective cooling solution would you recommend to not only sufficiently cool my PC components, but also limit the ambient temperature surge in my room?

Perhaps water cooling instead of fans? Fanless? Would any particular case help this problem?

Thanks in advance.
June 10, 2007 12:11:42 AM

The only way you'll be able to use a fanless water cooling rig is if you used a big car radiator, and your temps would be less then spectacular.

Water cooling is a good idea, a decent system can be had for less then $300 if you only want the cpu+gpu in the loop.

I'm assuming your going to be using a C2D in your system. They run ALOT cooler then your average P4, so your ambient temps should go down a bit anyway as long as you use a decent hsf or water cooling setup.

If you really want a cool room, just buy one of these. I mean, seriously, you can't really beat something designed to cool a room...
June 10, 2007 12:58:37 AM

Your PC will be a source of heat regardless of the cooling method You use - be it fanless, fans, liquid, state change. It's basic physics actually - the computer pulls energy from the wall and the energy has to go somewhere, right? Basically, most of the energy is dissipated as heat.
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June 10, 2007 1:05:49 AM

Thank you for the elementary physics lesson, albeit quite unnecessary. I'm well aware of the concepts regarding heat and energy.

Different cooling mechanisms have the ability to disperse heat in different forms, thus the very nature of my question. Yes, any computing device in my possession is likely to generate some amount of heat. However, given particular components, this "free energy" can be handled in a variety of forms.
June 10, 2007 4:25:27 AM

Something that might help is fi you gave us soem hint as to your gepgraphical location - i.e. if you live in a tropical clime or in a northern location. Getting rid of hot air from your room could be as simple and putting a small fan in your window pointed outside so as to expel the heat outside.
June 10, 2007 5:19:53 AM

What is it you don't understand?

To decrease room temp use an air-conditioner. It will not only increase the user comfort level but also correspondingly decrease system temp.
June 10, 2007 6:02:38 AM

Quote:
Thank you for the elementary physics lesson, albeit quite unnecessary. I'm well aware of the concepts regarding heat and energy.

Different cooling mechanisms have the ability to disperse heat in different forms, thus the very nature of my question. Yes, any computing device in my possession is likely to generate some amount of heat. However, given particular components, this "free energy" can be handled in a variety of forms.


You said:

Quote:
I'm not so much concerned with the heat inside my case as I am the ambient temperature in my room! My computer heats my room up significantly.

When I build my new system, I would like to eliminate this problem. What effective cooling solution would you recommend to not only sufficiently cool my PC components, but also limit the ambient temperature surge in my room?


Therefore -xyzak's- comment was 100% on-base. The computer will generate an identical amount of heat in the room regardless of how the components within the system are cooled. A solution is to radiate the heat OUT of the room. What I did in Summer with an overclocked P4 was run a laundry dryer duct from the fan outlet at the back of the system to a cutout wood panel at the window, so the system was drawing air from the room, heating it and dispersing it into the great outdoors.
June 10, 2007 6:18:16 AM

I'm pretty sure the heat is going to warm the room the same no matter how it's moved away from your computer. I would use a window mounted AC, or a free-standing one if you don't have a window you can mount it in. You could even get a little crazy and make some kind of fan shroud on the front of it to push the cold air directly at your computer. That would bring your temps down!
June 10, 2007 7:18:55 AM

Quote:
Something that might help is fi you gave us soem hint as to your gepgraphical location - i.e. if you live in a tropical clime or in a northern location. Getting rid of hot air from your room could be as simple and putting a small fan in your window pointed outside so as to expel the heat outside.


Simple cheap good advice.

Watercooling will reduce the temp of your cpu but not the room / rest of your pc, the radiator's purpose is to dissipate the heat from the pc and it does that by radiating it into your room so not possible to drop room temp by any alternative cooling method as they all ultimately rely on expelling it from the pc case.

Air conditioning is a good option from a temp point of view, but is expensive, costs a fortune to run and contributes heavily towards global warming through the high amount of electricity used. You might also find your electricity bill quite shocking, if you excuse the pun. :) 

Your best options are open the large window in the room provided you don't live somewhere tropical, or install an expell air type fan in the window. Although electric, these use far less power than an air con unit.
June 10, 2007 7:29:46 AM

Quote:
Therefore -xyzak's- comment was 100% on-base. The computer will generate an identical amount of heat in the room regardless of how the components within the system are cooled. A solution is to radiate the heat OUT of the room. What I did in Summer with an overclocked P4 was run a laundry dryer duct from the fan outlet at the back of the system to a cutout wood panel at the window, so the system was drawing air from the room, heating it and dispersing it into the great outdoors.


one of the many great uses of netburst, "heating the great outdoors". :lol: 
June 10, 2007 9:39:24 AM

Quote:
contributes heavily towards global warming through the high amount of electricity used.


Freakin hippies... Besides, if he was worried about global warming, he shouldn't have been using a HEATburst P4.

Quote:
Your best options are open the large window in the room provided you don't live somewhere tropical, or install an expell air type fan in the window. Although electric, these use far less power than an air con unit.


If he hasn't thought to open a window to cool his room, someone need to buy him a helmet. :) 

Sorry, it's 5:30 in the morning. I'm just kidding, I know what your saying Alsone. I'm just trying to stay awake till I get out of work...
June 10, 2007 9:44:25 AM

Quote:
I'm planning on building a new high end machine when the next Intel price drops hit in July. However, I want to try to solve a problem that I tend to have regarding machines in my room. I currently have a P4 system that generates a lot of heat. I'm not so much concerned with the heat inside my case as I am the ambient temperature in my room! My computer heats my room up significantly.

When I build my new system, I would like to eliminate this problem. What effective cooling solution would you recommend to not only sufficiently cool my PC components, but also limit the ambient temperature surge in my room?

Perhaps water cooling instead of fans? Fanless? Would any particular case help this problem?

Thanks in advance.


Quote:
I'm not so much concerned with the heat inside my case as I am the ambient temperature in my room!

Quote:
When I build my new system, I would like to eliminate this problem.

Quote:
What effective cooling solution would you recommend to not only sufficiently cool my PC components, but also limit the ambient temperature surge in my room?


Open the window and get on with life.
Simple question(s) given a simple answere.
June 10, 2007 11:50:33 AM

you should go for watercooling because you can position the heatflow better, thus moving the pocket of dense heat away from the user and computer. an example, with a water cooler the air will only get 1/3rd as hot but will get there 3x quicker because of heat density. (assuming rad is 3x as big as HSF) and also, watercooling systems are more efficient at cooling so the heat will be in smaller more manageable, yet denser amounts.

What i'm trying to say is that they will both heat your room on average the same amount but air cooling will more evenly heat the entire room.

i just got an evil idea after seeing that daewoo, using the compressor for compressor cooling :p , or using the giant rad for cooling.... *picks jaw back up*
!