Who in their right mind...

Would purchase an Athlon FX? Let us take a quick comparison.

AMD Athlon FX-62, 2.8Ghz, AM2. $299 on newegg
Intel C2D E6400, 2.13Ghz. $187.00 on newegg

Benchmarks:








I'm sitting here looking at the last user review of the FX-62 on newegg.com. April 10th. Looks like for the past 2 months no one is out of the mind. Seriously though, how can AMD expect anyone to buy this thing when it's almost twice the price??? I mean... let's drop the price a little guys.
25 answers Last reply
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  1. the main reason I stick to AMD right now is because I bought a OEM version of Windows. So to make the switch to Intel I would have to not only buy a new mother board but also another copy of windows. Since Im on a budget I'll stick with AMD.

    I wouldn't buy a FX though anyway, seems the X2 5600 at $179 is a much better deal for the money vs the FX 62
  2. Even the X2 6000+ would be a comparable buy in terms of specification, at a lot less in terms of price.
  3. I think the e64*0 and e63*0 are in a really sweet spot. Great performance for the price, and they OC pretty darn good too.
  4. the FX-62 is a relic from the A64 era ... it's price premium is also.
    if you think it's price is too high check out X6800 (the dual core one) ... is X6800 3 times more of a chip than a lowly 300$ E6700 (at only 266MHz faster)...

    for that kind of money you can almost get a Q6600 and 8800GTX ...
    Why would anybody in their right mind buy a X6800 ?

    This same question can be asked for pretty much every HIGH END Enthusiast product out there ...
  5. Adjustable multiplier???
  6. Quote:
    Adjustable multiplier???


    And that's worth 660$ to you?
    I don't ... but I'm happy for you if you think it is ...
  7. It's not worth 600+ to me but maybe that's why I put 3 ??? marks after that...now calm down ball sack.
  8. I wasn't trying to offend you or anything I just replyed to your question with another question (the happy part was meant to say if you think it's worth 600 extra you can probably afford it without twiching).

    I think adjustable multiplyers are awesome from an observer's point of view ... but charging 600 extra for it isn't ...

    "Ball sack" calming down ...
  9. Quote:
    the main reason I stick to AMD right now is because I bought a OEM version of Windows. So to make the switch to Intel I would have to not only buy a new mother board but also another copy of windows. Since Im on a budget I'll stick with AMD.

    I wouldn't buy a FX though anyway, seems the X2 5600 at $179 is a much better deal for the money vs the FX 62


    No you wouldnt. As far as the lisence goes, you can switch to whatever hardware you want (single socket), however, you will have to have windows reactivated. With the OEM version, that will entail having to install the OS then call MicroSofts 800 # and go through the phone process of getting a new 36 digit code.
  10. The X6800 has an advantage over the FX series: it's more overclockable. You're lucky to squeeze out 300mhz on that FX-62. A x6800 will scale all the way up to 3.9Ghz with the right active cooler.

    But yes, buying a x6800 is still foolish when you can get nearly the same results w/ a 6700 (although, the FSB would still limit you to about 3.3Ghz).

    So... there is SOME value in the x6800. Especially compared to the FX series.
  11. Quote:
    No you wouldnt. As far as the lisence goes, you can switch to whatever hardware you want (single socket), however, you will have to have windows reactivated. With the OEM version, that will entail having to install the OS then call MicroSofts 800 # and go through the phone process of getting a new 36 digit code.


    I thought I could only use the OEM with my current mobo? you sure on this?
  12. Quote:
    No you wouldnt. As far as the lisence goes, you can switch to whatever hardware you want (single socket), however, you will have to have windows reactivated. With the OEM version, that will entail having to install the OS then call MicroSofts 800 # and go through the phone process of getting a new 36 digit code.


    I thought I could only use the OEM with my current mobo? you sure on this?

    Yes. Over the years as I have upgraded/swapped systems numerous times. Ive used the same OEM WinXP OS. Its a pain having to go through the routine, but it is perfectly legal as long as you dont try to run 2 copies of the same licence simultaniously.

    After you install the OS, and go to activate it, it will not allow you to activate.
    You can then choose the phone activation method and it will give you the 800#
    The OS will then give you a 36 charecter code in blocks of six.
    Then you have to call the number. An automated service will have you read the 36 charecter code, after which it will read it back, say some garbage then connect you to a human (yes, I know...a real human!)
    you will then have to read the code to the human, who may or may not ask you why you need it (Im changing hardware) and tell you that you may only have one copy active at a time.
    The human will then give you a new 36 charecter code which will activate the OS.

    Warning! This will not work if you are using a pirated copy!!!
  13. Quote:

    But yes, buying a x6800 is still foolish when you can get nearly the same results w/ a 6700 (although, the FSB would still limit you to about 3.3Ghz).

    Huh? My 6700 is at 3.66 (click my sig) and will POST and boot at 4.0, but the voltage boost required made it too hot, even with only one core loaded (I wussed out before trying Orthos). Somewhere around 3.75 was where my chip started needing lots of voltage for stability, at 3.66 it is still stable below stock voltage (1.30 vs 1.3125). I don't doubt though that the X6800 might be able to go higher before hitting a stabilty wall, and I don't know with the sample size of 1 if my 6700 is average, excellent or poor compared to all other E6700s. I do know it will spank pretty much any FX-62 or 6000+ on air cooling though.

    I will agree though with the original post, even ignoring Intel I'd much sooner buy a 5600+ or 6000+ for less money over the FX-62, not to mention the 6000+ is faster than the FX-62.
  14. Quote:
    Yes. Over the years as I have upgraded/swapped systems numerous times. Ive used the same OEM WinXP OS. Its a pain having to go through the routine, but it is perfectly legal as long as you dont try to run 2 copies of the same licence simultaniously.

    After you install the OS, and go to activate it, it will not allow you to activate.
    You can then choose the phone activation method and it will give you the 800#
    The OS will then give you a 36 charecter code in blocks of six.
    Then you have to call the number. An automated service will have you read the 36 charecter code, after which it will read it back, say some garbage then connect you to a human (yes, I know...a real human!)
    you will then have to read the code to the human, who may or may not ask you why you need it (Im changing hardware) and tell you that you may only have one copy active at a time.
    The human will then give you a new 36 charecter code which will activate the OS.

    Warning! This will not work if you are using a pirated copy!!!


    Wow, well thank you for the 411... guess I better get a core 2 duo when the price drops come :)
  15. At least for XP, I thought it was something like they allowed a reactivation every 90 days or something like that. I've had XP Pro (OEM) for a few years now, while I have had to call, there have been reactivations that went right through online.
  16. It reminds me of the Netburst extreme editions. They were even more expensive and still they were bought. Even the 840 EE - the hottest processor on earth. There are crazy people.
  17. i was refering to the limited 333mhz FSB on some older motherboards. i do realize newer ones are capable of higher speeds and thus higher OC's on E6600's.

    a thousand apologies.
  18. Quote:
    Even the X2 6000+ would be a comparable buy in terms of specification, at a lot less in terms of price.

    Was that a serious post?
  19. i think he was comparing the FX-62 to the 6000+
  20. Quote:
    No you wouldnt. As far as the lisence goes, you can switch to whatever hardware you want (single socket), however, you will have to have windows reactivated. With the OEM version, that will entail having to install the OS then call MicroSofts 800 # and go through the phone process of getting a new 36 digit code.


    I did that a few days ago and I swear it took me half a minute to figure out I wasn't talking to a recording... unbelievably monotonic, like she'd done the same thing a thousand times (which she'd probably have).

    Anyways back to the topic: it's still a hell of a better deal than that EE965 that was up on Newegg for the same price as the X6800.
  21. Quote:
    No you wouldnt. As far as the lisence goes, you can switch to whatever hardware you want (single socket), however, you will have to have windows reactivated. With the OEM version, that will entail having to install the OS then call MicroSofts 800 # and go through the phone process of getting a new 36 digit code.


    I could be wrong but I believe MS changed their policy with Vista. This is from Newegg:

    "This OEM software is intended for system builders only and cannot be transferred to another PC once it is installed. The purchaser of this software is required to comply with the terms of the System Builder license, including the responsibility of providing all end user support for the software."

    I have a OEM version of XP that I've used many times on several systems but I believe with Vista it was changed to the motherboard representing the system and an OEM copy was only licensed for 1 system. You can change anything else but if you change the motherboard you have to buy a new license. As I said I could be wrong but it's something you might want to check into.
  22. Quote:
    No you wouldnt. As far as the lisence goes, you can switch to whatever hardware you want (single socket), however, you will have to have windows reactivated. With the OEM version, that will entail having to install the OS then call MicroSofts 800 # and go through the phone process of getting a new 36 digit code.


    I could be wrong but I believe MS changed their policy with Vista. This is from Newegg:

    "This OEM software is intended for system builders only and cannot be transferred to another PC once it is installed. The purchaser of this software is required to comply with the terms of the System Builder license, including the responsibility of providing all end user support for the software."

    I have a OEM version of XP that I've used many times on several systems but I believe with Vista it was changed to the motherboard representing the system and an OEM copy was only licensed for 1 system. You can change anything else but if you change the motherboard you have to buy a new license. As I said I could be wrong but it's something you might want to check into.


    That reads like the same licence agreement theyv'e had for years, including mine. Not a problem. What the OEM OS resellers used to have to do was sell the OS with a piece of 'hardware'. In my case, some ancient, worthless notebook RAM.

    In any event, its never been a problem with MS.
  23. Quote:
    After you install the OS, and go to activate it, it will not allow you to activate. You can then choose the phone activation method and it will give you the 800# The OS will then give you a 36 charecter code in blocks of six. Then you have to call the number. An automated service will have you read the 36 charecter code, after which it will read it back, say some garbage then connect you to a human (yes, I know...a real human!)
    you will then have to read the code to the human, who may or may not ask you why you need it (Im changing hardware) and tell you that you may only have one copy active at a time. The human will then give you a new 36 charecter code which will activate the OS.


    Perhaps it works different where you are, but I only ever have to read that entire code out once to the automated attendant... if it cannot validate your installation ID, it will then connect you to a MS representitive and they will ask you to read out only the first group of numbers. They may ask why you need to activate over the phone... but most of the time they just want to confirm that you're only using that product key on one computer.

    One time, the automated attendant actually was able to validate my ID and it gave me the number without talking to anyone... which I thought was pretty cool. But that was only one time out of about 10 I think.

    And MS has changed it's licensing... technically you are not allowed to upgrade your motherboard with an OEM license. Yes, you can still call in and pretend that your motherboard has failed if they ask you... but you're really not supposed to under the terms of the license. Although, I really don't see how MS is going to enforce this unless they start stating that you must replace your dead motherboard with the exact same model. (They can't really do that either, because motherboards are discontinued at some point).
  24. Like to live on the edge?
    I do wish you guys would look at who you are replying to.
    Do you think wingding got that tittle by mistake?
  25. Quote:
    After you install the OS, and go to activate it, it will not allow you to activate. You can then choose the phone activation method and it will give you the 800# The OS will then give you a 36 charecter code in blocks of six. Then you have to call the number. An automated service will have you read the 36 charecter code, after which it will read it back, say some garbage then connect you to a human (yes, I know...a real human!)
    you will then have to read the code to the human, who may or may not ask you why you need it (Im changing hardware) and tell you that you may only have one copy active at a time. The human will then give you a new 36 charecter code which will activate the OS.


    Perhaps it works different where you are, but I only ever have to read that entire code out once to the automated attendant... if it cannot validate your installation ID, it will then connect you to a MS representitive and they will ask you to read out only the first group of numbers. They may ask why you need to activate over the phone... but most of the time they just want to confirm that you're only using that product key on one computer.

    One time, the automated attendant actually was able to validate my ID and it gave me the number without talking to anyone... which I thought was pretty cool. But that was only one time out of about 10 I think.

    And MS has changed it's licensing... technically you are not allowed to upgrade your motherboard with an OEM license. Yes, you can still call in and pretend that your motherboard has failed if they ask you... but you're really not supposed to under the terms of the license. Although, I really don't see how MS is going to enforce this unless they start stating that you must replace your dead motherboard with the exact same model. (They can't really do that either, because motherboards are discontinued at some point).

    I dont really think it matters where you are. Every time Ive called, the human had an Indian accent, as in India. And Ive never seen a change to the licence, its always said the same thing regarding the oem licence, and hardware. Ultimately moot, as I have never heard a single case of MS denying anyone for legal copy, OEM or otherwise. Pirated copies on the other hand.....but thats a different story, and Im sure its not hard for MS to fugure out once the same code shows up umpteen times.
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