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Bootmanager compressed press Ctrl Alt Delete to reboot

Last response: in Windows Vista
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Anonymous
December 29, 2009 9:05:12 AM

Please help

I am running vista ultimate on my computer and have two hard drives, one old 40GB which houses my operating system and a larger drive 240GB with all the rest of my files. Over time my 40 GB DRIVE got used up and with 1.4GB free space left my computers duel core processor started running at 100 percent which normally dose not happen until I start rendering or something. In a panic I ran a disc cleanup and got around 2.6 GB but my processor was still running at 100 percent.
Foolishly I thought that I would try and make more space on my primary 40GB drive and chose the box that said Compress files to save disc space. I was pleased to find that I now had 7.5 GB free after compression. The processor seemed to be doing better (though not as good as normal) and started running at around 60%
The problem is that when I started the computer the next day I get a message on boot up telling me that the boot manager is compressed. Of course I compressed it, silly me.
I have not made up a boot disc to reboot with. My software is slowly heading my way via post. When it arrives I will have to reformat my hard drive and reinstall Vista. I had planned to refurbish the whole thing and install windows 7 but haven't got there yet. It is surprising how dependant we are on our computers. I have some work I desperately want to finish this week. The problem is that I will have to reinstall my software. Though it is on a different drive it is still affected by the reformatting of the primary drive. This will cost me more time. And of coarse I am still not sure why my processor was running at 100% in the first place.
Any suggestions? Is there any boot up discs that I can simply reboot my computer with?

Thanks for reading.

Joe
December 29, 2009 9:18:40 AM

The post is kind of long and I am not sure I have it straight, but when you compressed the OS hardrive the boot files were compressed and the system will not boot to the drive with Vista installed. If you have a Vista installation DVD, go into BIOS and set the first boot device to the DVD. Insert the installation disk into the tray and save enter. When the system boots and asks 'press any key to boot to the DVD' press any key at that time. After the installation files load choose repair boot files or similiar. If that does not work, you could try typing in FIXBOOT at a recovery console command prompt.
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Anonymous
December 29, 2009 10:08:57 AM

badge said:
The post is kind of long and I am not sure I have it straight, but when you compressed the OS hardrive the boot files were compressed and the system will not boot to the drive with Vista installed. If you have a Vista installation DVD, go into BIOS and set the first boot device to the DVD. Insert the installation disk into the tray and save enter. When the system boots and asks 'press any key to boot to the DVD' press any key at that time. After the installation files load choose repair boot files or similiar. If that does not work, you could try typing in FIXBOOT at a recovery console command prompt.


thanks

I will try this and see if I do not have to do a complete reinstall

Joe
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Anonymous
December 29, 2009 10:11:48 AM

badge said:
The post is kind of long and I am not sure I have it straight, but when you compressed the OS hardrive the boot files were compressed and the system will not boot to the drive with Vista installed. If you have a Vista installation DVD, go into BIOS and set the first boot device to the DVD. Insert the installation disk into the tray and save enter. When the system boots and asks 'press any key to boot to the DVD' press any key at that time. After the installation files load choose repair boot files or similiar. If that does not work, you could try typing in FIXBOOT at a recovery console command prompt.



thanks !!

You have it right. My only problem is that my installation disc is in the post and it will take some time for it to arive. I suspect that is the only way.

Joe
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December 29, 2009 10:13:25 AM

If the boot manager can not be 'repaired' like I described, choose the 'upgrade' path, not reinstall, and see if a repair of the OS and the Boot files occurs while saving all your personal files. Reinstall is a last resort if you do not want to loose all your files.
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December 29, 2009 10:15:24 AM

Quote:
thanks !!

You have it right. My only problem is that my installation disc is in the post and it will take some time for it to arive. I suspect that is the only way.

Joe


You must go into BIOS and set the first boot device to DVD in order to Boot to the installation disk. Try to repair the boot files by booting to the install disk in this fashion.
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December 29, 2009 10:18:36 AM

You can try this method to repair the boot files too:

Perform a repair installation of Windows Vista
When you perform a repair installation, this restores the current Windows Vista installation to the version on the installation DVD. This requires you to reinstall all updates that are not included in that version of Windows Vista.

To perform a repair installation of Windows Vista, follow these steps:
Restart the computer.
Insert the Windows Vista DVD in the computer's DVD drive.

Note If Windows does not automatically detect the DVD, click Start, type <Drive>:\setup.exe in the Search box, and then click Setup in the programs list. Then, click Install Now.
Click Go online to obtain the latest updates for installation (recommended).
Insert the product key if you are prompted for it.
Click to accept the Microsoft Software License Terms.
On the Which type of installation to you want screen, click Upgrade.
When the installation is complete, restart the computer, and then try to install updates again.

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December 29, 2009 2:12:01 PM

Never.... and I mean NEVER... compress files to save space. Your computer's performance will suffer horribly, as Windows has to decompress files on the fly in order to open them. With hard drives being as cheap as they are nowadays, you'd be much better served getting a much larger drive. I honestly don't know why Windows still includes this feature... it is rather usless in my opinion. It does free up drive space, but it does so with a heavy performance price. The space you gain is no where near worth the price you pay in performance.
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