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Is my Cpu Fried !! ? HELP

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June 15, 2007 12:48:46 PM

How do i know if a cpu is friend ?
i was currently trying to build a new pc , and used my old pcs psu , but when i put it back i forgot to connect the cpu fan , now all i get on screen is a option of F2 for Setup or F11 for boot options , and i cant even select ,its as if my keyboard is dead, i only get the chance to choose at the very start second , either way it hangs there forever... help plz ?!
Reset Bios ? if so HOW !
thanks
paul


mobo: P4VM8 Socket 478 , cpu: northbridge, 3.0ghz, ram : ddr 1.5gb (1gb + 500mb) i think O.o
help !!

More about : cpu fried

June 15, 2007 1:26:43 PM

The bios reset jumper is usually located near the battery. Check your manual.
June 15, 2007 1:44:59 PM

i found the manual for that board here:

http://download.asrock.com/manual/P4VM8.pdf

page 8 gives the board layout, reset cmos is at the top of the pci slots next to the cmos battery. If you dont have a jumper for the cmos on the board, nick one temporarily from a cd/dvd drive.


From the manual:

Quote:

CLRCMOS1 allows you to clear the data in CMOS. The data in CMOS includes
system setup information such as system password, date, time, and system
setup parameters. To clear and reset the system parameters to default setup,
please turn off the computer and unplug the power cord, then use a jumper
cap to short the pins on CLRCMOS1 for 3 seconds. Please remember to
remove the jumper cap after clearing the CMOS. If you need to clear the CMOS
when you just finish updating the BIOS, you must boot up the system first, and
then shut it down before you do the clear-CMOS action.


When you try booting, removal all peripherals that arent essential (cd, dvd hdd, floppy, mouse, pci cards, leave just one stick of ram in etc) .

Good luck...
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June 15, 2007 2:02:36 PM

Are you by chance using a USB keyboard?
I had a similar problem on an MSI board that by default disabled USB support in the BIOS. My USB keyboard wouldn't work until I could get into the BIOS and re-enable the USB ports.
I learned to keep a standard keyboard handy when I was playing around with overclocking, or other BIOS settings in the event I had to reset the BIOS.
June 15, 2007 2:35:10 PM

Your CPU has stepping technology that prevents it from overheating by slowing down. (AMD vs Intel video anyone?).

It is possible your OLD psu doesn't have the power to drive the computer. Use a PSU calculator to find out.

It is possible something is a tad lose (though if you see a display w/o beeping, probably not).

Try the other suggestions so far by others.
June 15, 2007 2:50:00 PM

Hi
well i tried the jumpers to clear the cmos and reset bios but now instead of the option of F2 for setup or F11 for boot options ,all i get now is F11 lol ,it cant be the psu as its been working forever and i only used it to try out on another system, i had a problem with psu before and i hence replaced it as it was was obvious bust before as i heard a "kapow" lol =), erm i reckon the cpu may have gone i dunno, any more ideas?
thanks
paul
June 15, 2007 4:21:12 PM

Quote:
Hi
... all i get now is F11 lol ,it cant be the psu as its been working forever and i only used it to try out on another system, i had a problem with psu before and i hence replaced it as it was was obvious bust before as i heard a "kapow" lol =), erm i reckon the cpu may have gone i dunno, any more ideas?
thanks
paul


Dont forget when youve used the jumper to reset the bios, you have to power down and remove the jjumper again.

The manual says the the board has automatic shutdown to protect against cpu overheat.

You could try removing the cmos battery for a couple of minutes, that will reset everything.

Check the following (sorry if suggestions are a bit obvious):

If you moved the cpu to a new motherboard you did clean and then use thermal past and make sure heatsink is on properly.

Make sure you plugged the cpu into the right fan conector (ie the cpu one not the fan chasis one).

The manual says not to use 3.3volt agp cards with this board (remove any gfx card and use the on board gfx).

Is the square 12volt connector plugged into the motherboard properly (motherboard wont work without it?

Are there any physical signs of damage to the motherboard and is it sitting on its spacers (i.e. not touching the case creating a short)?

How about trying a usb keyboard? Maybe your ps2 keyboard is knackered. Also, try a bootable floppy disk or live disc if you've got one (bartpe or knoppix maybe), if you can boot from them your problem isn't with cpu.
June 15, 2007 8:08:47 PM

Remove every component from the motherboard then reattach the following:

CPU with HSF and thermal grease.
A keyboard you KNOW is working, preferably two of separate interfaces (one USB and one PS2).
Connect graphics card if you don't have it onboard.
Connect power cables.

Also reset the CMOS for good measure and try booting into the BIOS again, the fact that the motherboard posts shows that the CPU is alive somewhat, there is hope for you yet.
June 16, 2007 1:50:54 AM

Removing the cmos battery seems a bit tricky and dangerous somewhat lol , i dont know how to do this without damaging , everything is connected fine , i dont have a available mobo to test the cpu,but everything was fine before i accidentally forgot to connect the cpu fan..., dont have a usb keyboard, mobo is fine on spacers, cannot get into boots options so cannot try to boot from cd etc but will try a floppy disc !
thanks
paul..
June 16, 2007 2:48:00 AM

It sounds to me like you forgot to connect something else properly. Like the hard drive. Either the power connector or the data cable. Are you using a SATA or IDE boot drive?
June 16, 2007 11:31:04 AM

Quote:
Removing the cmos battery seems a bit tricky....


Not really...
June 16, 2007 11:40:20 AM

It's incredibly difficult to damage something removing the battery, don't be afraid to use force. It's not difficult, it just takes a little time, after you do it once, you'll be able to do it again and again in no time.
June 16, 2007 12:08:00 PM

Quote:
It's incredibly difficult to damage something removing the battery, don't be afraid to use force. It's not difficult, it just takes a little time, after you do it once, you'll be able to do it again and again in no time.
I don't know who to reply to so you are it. First someone mentioned that after you move the BIOS reset strap that you need to reset the computer. Any MB that I have seen you need to move the reset strap with the power off and if the power is on you might damage the MB. Also, removing the battery, which I have heard so may time as to be frustrating, is of no value on any MB that is less than at least 10 years old. That is what the reset strap is for. The reason that the strap is used is because it is possible that there are capacitors that will hold the BIOS up for 24 to 50 hours. So just use the strap and stop with the removing the battery stupidity.
June 16, 2007 2:17:10 PM

erm , what is the reset strap ? 8O is it the clrcmos jumpers thingies ? lol
thanks
paul
June 16, 2007 4:49:18 PM

Quote:
First someone mentioned that after you move the BIOS reset strap that you need to reset the computer. Any MB that I have seen you need to move the reset strap with the power off and if the power is on you might damage the MB.


Obviously you turn off the power BEFORE you mess with jumpers (as per the extract of the manual I posted).
June 17, 2007 2:23:50 AM

Quote:
First someone mentioned that after you move the BIOS reset strap that you need to reset the computer. Any MB that I have seen you need to move the reset strap with the power off and if the power is on you might damage the MB.


Obviously you turn off the power BEFORE you mess with jumpers (as per the extract of the manual I posted).

That's great, then WTF does this mean :?:
Quote:
Dont forget when youve used the jumper to reset the bios, you have to power down and remove the jjumper again.
June 17, 2007 4:39:06 PM

Quote:
First someone mentioned that after you move the BIOS reset strap that you need to reset the computer. Any MB that I have seen you need to move the reset strap with the power off and if the power is on you might damage the MB.


Obviously you turn off the power BEFORE you mess with jumpers (as per the extract of the manual I posted).

That's great, then WTF does this mean :?:
Quote:
Dont forget when youve used the jumper to reset the bios, you have to power down and remove the jjumper again.



Ok, as plain as possible :roll: :

1) Turn off power.
2) Change position of (or add depending on mobo) clear cmos jumper.
3) IF your mobo says to turn on power with the clr cmos jumper set (mine and lots of others do) do so.
4) Turn off power and change position of (or remove depending on mobo) jumper.
5) If you don't understand the above, take one large hammer and apply vigarously to motherboard, then place on the top shelf of your oven at gas mark 6 for 30 minutes (adjust time accordingly for fan ovens) until golden brown :D 
June 17, 2007 5:53:56 PM

Then you should have stated that. My mobo manual, and many others, specifically states that the jumper should be moved and then replaced in it's original position with the power off only. It states that if this is done with the power on or left in that position and power is applied mobo damage could occur. So maybe you should be more careful with your instructions and maybe just tell the individual to consult his manual without the additional instructions that could lead to damaging their mobo.
June 18, 2007 7:49:51 AM

Well my first post did include a link to the manual and the exact text from the manual re: clearing cmos, everything else is general advice.

Note muse said "all i get now is f11" which would indicate he may have left the jumper in place while booting (cant edit bios with clr cmos set), so advice to remove the clr cmos jumper with the power off still stands, unless you think its better if he removes it with the power on?

Aside from that, how about your suggestions (apart from using "the reset strap"), you obviously have a whole wealth of knowledge on this topic that you're just bursting to share with us. Or are you just bitching about semantics because you have no constructive suggestions??
June 18, 2007 8:54:29 PM

Quote:
Well my first post did include a link to the manual and the exact text from the manual re: clearing cmos, everything else is general advice.

Note muse said "all i get now is f11" which would indicate he may have left the jumper in place while booting (cant edit bios with clr cmos set), so advice to remove the clr cmos jumper with the power off still stands, unless you think its better if he removes it with the power on?

Aside from that, how about your suggestions (apart from using "the reset strap"), you obviously have a whole wealth of knowledge on this topic that you're just bursting to share with us. Or are you just bitching about semantics because you have no constructive suggestions??
My main point is that everyone states to remove the battery which is total BS. The purpose of removing and or moving the strap is to remove the battery from the circuit and in many, if not most, cases to ground the cmos in order to drain off any charge that is holding up the programmed cmos. The additional concern is what I have already posted and that is that the "general" advice can in fact, depending on the mobo cause irreparable damage. Now if you were giving him specific information that relates to his specific mobo then I apologize. If not then you should limit your advice to "check your manual for specific cmos clearing procedures as it relates to your mobo"
!