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Best sound card for the buck?

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  • Sound Cards
  • Audio
  • Striker Extreme
  • Components
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June 17, 2007 9:40:30 PM

I am wanting to buy a sound card. I am currently using the integrated audio with my Asus Striker Extreme mb. I have Creative Labs P7800 7.1 speakers and would like to get more performance with the audio.

What would you guys recommend as a really good sound card? I have looked at several SoundBlaster cards, but am unsure as to which would be the better choice. I am a big gamer and also like to listen to music. Price is not a huge issue (looking to drop no more than 300-400 usd) in my choice.

What do you guys think?


ravn

More about : sound card buck

June 19, 2007 3:17:32 AM

Yes Creative is the Top leader in sound cards, but is bloated in their software for it that takes a good portion of your computer resources. Plus Creative is still having drivers problem for Vista.

Here is a upcoming sound card you should at least look at before buying. Bluegears b-Enspirer 7.1 Channels 24-bit 192KHz PCI Interface Sound Card. It costs $109.00 at NewEgg.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Related resources
June 19, 2007 3:20:53 AM

x-fi probly unless you want bragging rights er something in that case go to newegg and select the most expensive card you can afford with the best reveiws :roll:
June 19, 2007 1:23:04 PM

Yikes! Why spend so much for a sound card? I almost didn't let myself buy the Creative X-fi Xtremegamer for $90, might be a little cheaper now.

Anyhow, I also like to run games fast and listen to music. I have good Sennheiser PX250 headphones and decent 5.1 surround system and everything sounds as good as can be, to where any possible gains I might get from a 3-4 hundred$ card would be barely noticeable. Clarity is amazing as is the surround sound.

But even more I love the performance boost I get on many games with this card. Called Xtremegamer for a reason, I have seen with my own eyes the advertised (up to) 15% performance in games compared to both onboard audio or even the $30 soundblaster cards.
I've seen both the most generic Live card and my xtremegamer work just fine in vista now, creative is actively updating drivers and some are very new. I haven't noticed any issues, but if there are some I feel pretty confident that they will get anything major worked out, if they haven't already.

If you said you weren't a gamer and were solely dedicated to audio and do some serious HiFi stuff that is beyond the norm, then the $300+ card might be for you.
Also, if you are simply rich$$ and don't care about gaming, then by all means, as was mentioned, buy the most expensive card with the best reviews.
There is one person I happen to know that is on a budget and has been willing to spend $300+ just for perhaps a 3%-5% increase in sound quality for his very HiFi 7.1 (and very expensive) speaker setup.
It only makes sense because he is dedicated to audio and he isn't a gamer at all. His computer is just a sound machine, basically.
He mixes and produces some tracks, does some serious HiFi work.

But even in his case, he followed the general rule of thumb, which was to buy a really sweet and expensive speaker system before buying an expensive sound card.
However, even for the average extreme gamer with a nice speaker setup, a $300+ card still doesn't make much sense in most cases.

Furthermore, since you are a gamer, it is very possible that you can lose out on a potential 15% increase in gaming performance by going with a $300+ card that is dedicated entirely to audio.

Now, if you have like a $300+ speaker setup and gaming is a much lower priority than good sounding audio, then maybe, just maybe, the $300+ card might be worth it. But you have to be the kind of audiophile that is OK with spending a couple hundred extra dollars just for maybe a 5% increase in quality on a high end HiFi setup, and don't care about gaming, then again, the $300+ card might be worth it.

But like I said, even if you are loaded with $$, keep in mind that you are a gamer. And if you are anything like most gamers, I would assume you would want something like the xtremegamer that will give you a performance boost as well as crystal clear audio.

Yeah, the xtremegamer does sound great even on my Sennheiser PX250 phones, and my 5.1 that I paid nearly as much for. I can't imagine a more expensive card being to improve things much further as things already sound pretty much perfect.
And for the price, it was a great purchase. Perfect for somebody that wants a good all around system, but isn't a dedicated audiophile, but is however a gamer and all around computer user.
Not saying you need to get an xtremegamer, although the X-fi series might be perfect for you, but I am saying you can likely meet your needs in that same $100-ish price range.

Don't know if this post helps at all. Depending on how familiar you are with sound cards and sound, maybe I just told you what you already know. But in case you aren't incredibly familiar, hopefully this helped you out.
Spending more $$ for certain things doesn't always make them the best choice, even without a budget. Usually, yes, but not always.
June 20, 2007 12:07:52 AM

I would like to pay less than that for a card, but 300 to 400 usd would be the maximum I would be willing to spend
June 29, 2007 6:40:18 PM

Is this one out of the question?

@Yoosty: thats an eggcellent card, nice pick. You will toss those 96kHz Creatives right into the garbage, bloated and unfriendly drivers go 1st. :p 

f61
July 1, 2007 4:38:40 PM

I can't tell if your speakers have a digital in. But if they do, I suggest you buy an ASUS S/Pdif module (it's about $10-$20) and a digital co-ax/fibre optic and connect direct to your speakers. Ie. bypass the onboard sound and let the speakers decode the digital signal. I do this with my PC connected to a Yamaha dolby digital reciever. The sound clarity is outstanding compared to the mangled signal sent by the onboard sound.
December 21, 2009 3:45:46 AM

My X-Fi XtremeGamer card was the best while I was running Windows xp(which it was designed for). When i switched to windows 7 it was the worst card in the world. The software is a nightmare, and I've spent a lot weeks e-mailing creative and being on forums. (a joke because there is no support, its buyer beware) I heard more success with the higher end more expensive cards So I decided to never buy a creative sound card again. They e-mail you (and it takes a week if your lucky) and tell you to re-install the software. Really creative? Huh I never would of thought of that. And thats the very best of creatives support. I think I will look at ASUS or someone else next time. creative has totally dropped the software ball on their sound cards.
December 21, 2009 3:24:25 PM

ASUS Xonar DX ($89.99) or HT Omega Striker ($89.99). Blows the old ExtremeGamer out of the water, quite frnakly.

My list of recommended cards:
ASUS:
Xonar DX
Xonar D2/D2X
Essence ST/STX

Auzentech:
Forte
Prelude

HT Omega:
Striker
Claro

Frankly, the Claro (HT Omega) and Essence ST/STX (ASUS) are the best soundcards on the market, bar none (with the Prelude not that far behind). The Striker (HT Omega) and Xonar DX (ASUS) take up the budget space, beating pretty much everything in Creatives arsenal quite handly.
December 21, 2009 3:41:57 PM

+1 ^^

HT Omega hands down... Don't buy anything that has a Creative logo on it... Creative cards are overpriced and do not perform up to task vs. other brands....



December 21, 2009 3:46:19 PM

Is one of the cards you mentioned designed for Windows 7 specifically? Most I have found are designed for Vista, then get a problematic upgraded driver to W7. Also what is your choice as the best card and software combo in your list hands down (ASUS Xonar DX ($89.99) or HT Omega Striker ($89.99)) I game a lot- Left 4 dead 2- Crysis plus I listen to a lot of MP3's
Asus P5LD2 motherboard
Nvidia GeForce 8800 GTX
Intel Pentium D 3.20 MHz
500 gig WD harddrive
3.00 gig ram
Windows 7 64 bit
Thanks

gamerk316 said:
ASUS Xonar DX ($89.99) or HT Omega Striker ($89.99) Blows the old ExtremeGamer out of the water, quite frnakly.

My list of recommended cards:
ASUS:
Xonar DX
Xonar D2/D2X
Essence ST/STX

Auzentech:
Forte
Prelude

HT Omega:
Striker
Claro

Frankly, the Claro (HT Omega) and Essence ST/STX (ASUS) are the best soundcards on the market, bar none (with the Prelude not that far behind). The Striker (HT Omega) and Xonar DX (ASUS) take up the budget space, beating pretty much everything in Creatives arsenal quite handly.

December 21, 2009 4:17:17 PM

randar007 said:
Is one of the cards you mentioned designed for Windows 7 specifically? Most I have found are designed for Vista, then get a problematic upgraded driver to W7. Also what is your choice as the best card and software combo in your list hands down (ASUS Xonar DX ($89.99) or HT Omega Striker ($89.99)) I game a lot- Left 4 dead 2- Crysis plus I listen to a lot of MP3's
Asus P5LD2 motherboard
Nvidia GeForce 8800 GTX
Intel Pentium D 3.20 MHz
500 gig WD harddrive
3.00 gig ram
Windows 7 64 bit
Thanks


That does not matter because you are not going to use the Drivers disk that came with the card. Just go to the website and download the latest Drivers and you will be fine. All sound card companies have the latest Win 7 drivers so that is not an issue.

http://www.htomega.com/downloads.html
December 21, 2009 7:36:41 PM

I know all the ASUS cards support 7. I don't know about HT Omega, although they use the same C-Media chipset that ASUS uses, so they almost certainly have 7 drivers.

Last I heard, Creative still hadn't gotten 7 drivers, which would mean Auzentech would also be without them [Let me know ASAP if that situation has changed].

Note: Worst case, Vista drivers work fine 99.9% of the time.

As for DX vs. Striker: The Striker has slightly better analog playback, and I think [correct me if I'm wrong] supports both Dolby Digital Live and DTS connect [the DX only supports Dolby Digital Live], but the DX has support via drivers for EAX 5.0.
Anonymous
January 20, 2010 8:43:14 AM

Hi guys - thanks for the excellent advice, as I too am now at the sound card comparison stage.

1st time poster :hello: 

Randar007 is right to be concerned about Windows 7 support - at least, where Creative is concerned.

Creative may officially 'support' Windows 7, but like myself and Randar007, many people (XFI-range users in particular) have experienced major problems when they upgrade from XP/Vista to 7.
It is not reassuring to see that despite these well established issues, the last official Creative Windows 7 XFI drivers were released back in May 2009, with one subsequent minor release that only fixes their 'auto update' software.

I can only speak for Creative and, like Randar, was hugely impressed by the performance and compatibility of my XFI XtremeGamer card with XP 32/64, but my experience over the last 48 hours has turned me off Creative for life.

I have more than little (perhaps less than alot) of technical knowledge when it comes to installing, building, tweaking etc, and I spent over 8 hours patently running through what I am now fairly confident are almost known fixes for my Windows 7 install problems via the helpful (user community) Creative forums.

A couple of searches in these forums will reveal a lot of irate users with a shockingly wide range of issues. Although many of the problems are fixable, the general consensus seems to be that their customer service is almost non existent. As a result, almost all of the fixes and driver packages are unofficial, designed by enthusiasts who have built up a whole community of followers as a result of Creative's pathetic support.

I'm certainly not knocking this card on performance when it works, but it seems that there's an unusually high overall occurrence of Windows 7 setups that Creative XFI drivers simply do not like.

I'll be selling my fully functioning XtremeGamer card on eBay, but I'll feel morally obliged to warn any buyer to read up on their system's compatibility before attempting an install on Windows 7.

Based on the info in this thread, and the favourable compatibility/performance/support-themed reviews found elsewhere, I think I'll be giving the HT Omega Striker a go :) 

Does anyone have any other suggested sound cards to throw into the mix?


January 20, 2010 10:07:59 AM

All you say you want is "more performance". I suspect that not even you know what you mean, exactly. I wouldn't expect any noticeable difference in the overall quality of straight sound going from your ADI AD1988B to anything else. There are many different features that you can pay for on a sound card, including DDL/DTS Direct, simulated surround, and EAX effects, and you'd need to decide optical or coaxial SPDIF (coaxial is better under most conditions). So you'd need to narrow down just what it is you're looking for before you could decide which one to get. But I always try to get people to consider upgrading their speakers instead, because you'll hear the greatest improvement that way. How about a nice, slammin' 18-inch subwoofer or a 10-pound Bose center speaker?

Just do yourself a favor and don't get a Creative card. I think they must have been what Douglas Adams had in mind when he wrote that you're paying for the sense of accomplishment you get from making the damned thing do anything at all.
January 20, 2010 11:36:47 AM

To be fiar, this thread started in 2007, before ASUS, HT Omega, and even Auzentech got their goods out. It was X-fi or bust then...
January 20, 2010 2:06:27 PM

I have 3 PC's with windows 7 64 bit, the first one is my gaming rig (crosshair III) and it currently has an XF-i working flawless, the second PC is my backup (dell XPS 410) paired with an HT-Omega Striker and it also works fine, I also have a work/gaming pc that has an extreme-gamer and I have no issues whatsoever when it comes to the drivers.... All i had to do was go to the website of each manufacturer and download either the most current 64bit drivers or use a beta driver that can easily be found by using google....
Anonymous
January 20, 2010 2:40:17 PM

Anyone know where I can buy an HT Omega Striker, ordering from UK?

I can only find them on non-international shipping sites NewEgg and NCIC.

Thanks!
January 20, 2010 3:43:13 PM

I think Amazon may have them...

Creative drivers aside, their sound quality is still a notch below everyone else:
Titanium Pro: 109 dB, 96Khz
ASUS Xonar DX: 116 dB, 192Khz
HT Omega Striker: 117 dB, 192Khz

All for the same price. Creative is lagging behind the times.
January 20, 2010 5:00:56 PM

Auzentech!
January 29, 2010 3:10:25 PM

listen to what gamerk316 is saying

ASUS WINS over any creative junky sound card out there...

everything u can compare with , asus will always be top, i mean just look at the reviews, where they compare the 2, its everywhere over the internet....
January 29, 2010 3:15:30 PM

and where exactly is this all over the internet? creative based cards are rated above asus's c media chips across the board for gaming. for entertainment, yes the c media wins. the auzentech forte is an excellent card.
January 29, 2010 3:31:32 PM

^^ People buy the cards, they sound good, so they give 4 stars/eggs. The specs on the cards don't lie: Creatives cards are a significant notch below the competitions, and anyone whos listened to other brands knows this.

Creative still lacks 192Khz output. They've yet to release a card with a SnR higher then 110dB. They still lack Dolby/DTS decoders out of the box. They use CMSS3d instead of the [in my opinion] superior Dolby Headphone/Speaker algorithm. And of course, you still run the risk of SCP, driver failures, and all the usual problems Creative is famous for.

Its ASUS vs Auzentech at this point for the top spot. [Ironically, Auzentech uses the X-fi chipset with good components; its just Creative being cheap, as per usual].

That being said, Creative is coming out with a monster card soon [roumered 122dB SnR over the main line out], so maybe they have some hope left...
January 29, 2010 4:03:10 PM

Yes, Creative's cards do sound bad when compared to the competition.
They lack features, proper support and rely on misleading marketing to sell.
I have a Creative X-Fi card and Xonars installed in my systems.
The Xonar cards really are a large step above.
gamerk316 said:
I think Amazon may have them...

Creative drivers aside, their sound quality is still a notch below everyone else:
Titanium Pro: 109 dB, 96Khz
ASUS Xonar DX: 116 dB, 192Khz
HT Omega Striker: 117 dB, 192Khz

All for the same price. Creative is lagging behind the times.

I am interested where you found the detailed specs for the HT|Omega Striker gamerk316.
Specifically, I can not locate anything on the web concerning the SNR of the card.

Not saying it is a bad budget card but I think your specs are a bit off.
I know for sure it can only sample at 96Khz and its C-Media CMI8770 is somewhat dated....
January 29, 2010 4:31:32 PM

gamerk316 said:
^^ People buy the cards, they sound good, so they give 4 stars/eggs. The specs on the cards don't lie: Creatives cards are a significant notch below the competitions, and anyone whos listened to other brands knows this.

Creative still lacks 192Khz output. They've yet to release a card with a SnR higher then 110dB. They still lack Dolby/DTS decoders out of the box. They use CMSS3d instead of the [in my opinion] superior Dolby Headphone/Speaker algorithm. And of course, you still run the risk of SCP, driver failures, and all the usual problems Creative is famous for.

Its ASUS vs Auzentech at this point for the top spot. [Ironically, Auzentech uses the X-fi chipset with good components; its just Creative being cheap, as per usual].

That being said, Creative is coming out with a monster card soon [roumered 122dB SnR over the main line out], so maybe they have some hope left...


you are comparing the CREATIVE soundcard. The Auzentech that uses the x fi chip does support all these things. I have the Forte, and it has all these features, and more. And it isn't even the top model. Here are the specs:

http://www.auzentech.com/site/products/x-fi_forte.php

And it supports all this, out of the box. I agree with you that the creative sound cards are not as good as asus. But auzentech had the c media chip that the xonar has before asus got the exclusive deal to have it all to themselves. they are not creative, they just use the x fi chipset now, with much better parts. take a gander

also, i am only talking about gaming. the c media based cards are better for basically everything else.
January 29, 2010 7:05:40 PM

^^ Actually, Auzentech used an older C-media chip, and started to make better cards then Creative (X-Raider/Meridian anyone?). Creative offered its chipset to Auzentech (probably to make some $$ on every card Auzentech sold). Auzentech in turn modifys the chipset by using higher tier components.

Razer, ASUS, HT, and a few other smaller companies have made soundcards on the C-media chipset. The chipset is in no way exclusive to ASUS.

I might have goofed with HT though; The striker does use an older C-media chipset that only offers 96Khz. I swear I read 117 SnR somewhere recently though...
January 29, 2010 7:26:39 PM

gamerk316 said:
^^ Actually, Auzentech used an older C-media chip, and started to make better cards then Creative (X-Raider/Meridian anyone?). Creative offered its chipset to Auzentech (probably to make some $$ on every card Auzentech sold). Auzentech in turn modifys the chipset by using higher tier components.

Razer, ASUS, HT, and a few other smaller companies have made soundcards on the C-media chipset. The chipset is in no way exclusive to ASUS.

I might have goofed with HT though; The striker does use an older C-media chipset that only offers 96Khz. I swear I read 117 SnR somewhere recently though...



Exactly. But what I'm saying is that the current auzentech forte is a much better card than its creative counterpart. I had this same issue when I bought a sound card recently. I did a lot of research, and the majority of the reviewers picked the auzentech for gaming. It got beat out in almost all other areas by the c media asus card. They are both awesome cards, but if you game a lot, I would get the auzentech. With it, you get the option to upgrade its already great components with even better ones. The asus doesn't have EAX 5 support, just 2. I don't know how much longer EAX will be around, but that is another plus on the x fi side. I say gaming: auzentech. everything else: c-media
January 29, 2010 7:38:54 PM

gamerk316 said:
^^ Actually, Auzentech used an older C-media chip, and started to make better cards then Creative (X-Raider/Meridian anyone?). Creative offered its chipset to Auzentech (probably to make some $$ on every card Auzentech sold). Auzentech in turn modifys the chipset by using higher tier components.

Razer, ASUS, HT, and a few other smaller companies have made soundcards on the C-media chipset. The chipset is in no way exclusive to ASUS.

I might have goofed with HT though; The striker does use an older C-media chipset that only offers 96Khz. I swear I read 117 SnR somewhere recently though...



I missed this part in your post. Yes, according to this, it is exclusive to asus.

http://techreport.com/discussions.x/15206

Look around, why do you think auzentech would stop using a c-media chip? Its because asus took over. Its like madden football games in the nfl. only they can use the nfl.
January 29, 2010 7:42:16 PM

Actually, the ASUS Xonar line DOES support EAX 5.
It can do EAX 2 in hardware and EAX 5 with software emulation (similar to the X-Fi Xtreme Audio, Audigy SE, Live! 24-bit, Audigy ADVANCED MB and X-Fi MB).
The implementation is quite nice also, just click one button and it works.
Compare that to Creative's ALchemy EAX wrapper if you like :lol: 

Regardless, EAX is dead.
The new audio stack in Vista and Windows 7 has assured this.
You can use software wrappers to get functionallity in older games but do not expect any new titles to support it.
Creative has already stated that developers should be using the OpenAL standard...
January 29, 2010 7:52:02 PM

that is a nice card. i forgot all about that one. well worth the money.
January 29, 2010 7:53:38 PM

I would counter the Striker with a DX or D1 :p 
January 29, 2010 10:50:39 PM

And customer support if second to none, you call and the dude knows the answer, no more dealing with useless reps =)

that card would have a rating of over 90% if it werent for all the noobs that post negative reviews putting down a very good product... IDK, the Egg should get rid of the nonsense review's and make it fair.... If you don't know what you are talking about you shouldnt be entitled to a review :non: 
January 30, 2010 3:28:38 AM

OvrClkr said:
And customer support if second to none, you call and the dude knows the answer, no more dealing with useless reps =)

that card would have a rating of over 90% if it werent for all the noobs that post negative reviews putting down a very good product... IDK, the Egg should get rid of the nonsense review's and make it fair.... If you don't know what you are talking about you shouldnt be entitled to a review :non: 


that, and you get people that put a review up that haven't even used the product. they should filter that better..
January 30, 2010 3:35:09 AM

Exactly, people who have no clue about the product yet they have the nuts to post a lie.....
January 30, 2010 3:51:10 AM

outlw6669 said:
Actually, the ASUS Xonar line DOES support EAX 5.
It can do EAX 2 in hardware and EAX 5 with software emulation (similar to the X-Fi Xtreme Audio, Audigy SE, Live! 24-bit, Audigy ADVANCED MB and X-Fi MB).
The implementation is quite nice also, just click one button and it works.
Compare that to Creative's ALchemy EAX wrapper if you like :lol: 

Regardless, EAX is dead.
The new audio stack in Vista and Windows 7 has assured this.
You can use software wrappers to get functionallity in older games but do not expect any new titles to support it.
Creative has already stated that developers should be using the OpenAL standard...


technically, that is not EAX 5. emulating it into EAX 2 is not the same thing. while it may sound good, it is not the real thing. its not a real big deal, as EAX will probably be gone, shortly.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...
January 30, 2010 7:19:09 AM

Yes, EAX will be gone shortly...

Regardless though, I think you may have misunderstood how the Xonar's handle EAX.
They have full, 100% accurate EAX 2 processing in hardware.
The EAX 5 support is a software solution (similar to how Creative emulates EAX support for several of their products), nothing is remixed into EAX 2.
As Creative does not license EAX 5 at all however, ASUS had to reverse engineer the calls and functions of such.
Because of this, you are not getting 100% true EAX 5 support but, in function, it works just as good.

This is probably the best wright up I have seen on the Xonar's EAX support.
Curtosiy of The Tech Report's Xonar Dx Review...
Quote:
A creative approach to EAX support
Perhaps the greatest weakness of the Oxygen HD audio chip used in the Xonar DX is its relatively pedestrian positional 3D audio credentials. The chip natively supports EAX 2.0—a technology that dates back to the SoundBlaster Live! and is restricted to 32 concurrent 3D voices. Creative's latest X-Fis can handle up to 128 concurrent 3D voices at higher definition sampling rates and resolutions. The X-Fi also performs positional audio calculations in hardware, while the Oxygen HD has to offload them to the host system's CPU.

The popularity of multi-core processors (and more importantly, games that leave multiple cores unused) has lessened the need for hardware-accelerated 3D audio, but there's still a big gap between EAX 2.0 and 5.0. Asus bridges that gap with a software feature it calls DirectSound 3D GX 2.0, which is capable of emulating EAX 5.0 functionality that had previously only been available with Creative's X-Fi cards.

DS3D GX presents the Xonar as an EAX 5.0-compliant audio card, and then intercepts EAX calls, re-routing them to the Xonar's own audio processing engine. That engine does its best to approximate EAX effects, and it can handle up to 128 concurrent 3D voices with enhanced reverb effects for "most" DirectSound 3D games. Positional audio calculations are still performed on the host system's CPU, but DS3D GX at least brings the Xonar beyond EAX 2.0's 32-voice limitation.

Creative is quick to point out that DirectSound 3D GX doesn't deliver "genuine" EAX 5.0 effects, and Asus readily admits as much. However, Asus also says users will be hard-pressed to tell the difference between the two—a claim we'll explore when we dive into listening tests a little later in the review.

Asus cites an additional advantage of its DS3D GX approach for Windows Vista users. Vista features an all-new Universal Audio Architecture (which you can read about in more detail in our initial look at the Xonar D2X) that removes the hardware abstraction layer for DirectSound 3D, effectively killing positional 3D audio in games that exclusively rely on DirectSound 3D and its EAX extensions. To work around the new audio stack, Creative offers an ALchemy software package that converts DirectSound 3D calls for processing by a third-party OpenAL API that still has direct access to audio hardware in Vista.

Thus, at least in Vista, ALchemy performs a similar function to DirectSound 3D GX. However, ALchemy is a standalone application that must be specifically configured to work with different games. DS3D GX is built right into the Xonar's drivers and doesn't require additional software or game-specific profiles.
January 30, 2010 8:16:50 PM

Hmm... I remember at the time I was looking up all this stuff when I was buying a new sound card thinking that was weird, so I was under the impression that the xonar did a terrible job of EAX all the way around.. good to know
January 31, 2010 6:40:55 AM

The HT Omega Striker is superior to the Titanium and cost's less.....
January 31, 2010 9:43:50 AM

And the ASUS Xonar DX/D1 are ≥ the Striker for the same price :p 

Really, those Creative cards are quite low quality and overpriced.
There are better sound cards available for less.
Do your self a favor and get one of those instead.
January 31, 2010 9:11:30 PM

the creative brand may be.. but not the auzentech ones. you will never convince me otherwise!
January 31, 2010 9:15:19 PM

Auzentech is in a different class than Creative.

The chipset is one thing, the supporting circuitry (DAC, ADC, OPAMPS, etc.) another.
Creative may have a good chip (if you ignore the shitty drivers) but everything that supports it is crap.
Auzentech's implementation is everything Creative's should have been.
January 31, 2010 9:25:43 PM

yes. although the drivers, are not as good as i would like. don't get me wrong, they are no where near the level of suckness as creative's, but are a little more problematic than they should be. they main problem is the creative branded software it comes with that i use, namely the control panel. it takes a good ten seconds to load, and will crash the majority of apps running at the same time.
February 1, 2010 2:50:34 AM

im having issues with my Extreme-Gamer, if i use the front audio jacks I get mad static but if I use the rear it sounds perfect... Very wierd....

I have already seen how the Striker performs so that will be the next upgrade =)
February 1, 2010 5:40:04 AM

Your ears will be happier :) 

It could just be an issue with your FP jacks, though.
Most of them, and their associated cabling, are pretty low quality.
Really, your best sound comes directly out the back of the card.
February 1, 2010 5:53:33 AM

yea I figured it was the crappy cables that came with the case.... ground wire might be messed up...

might re-wire and see if that helps....
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