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IS THIS BUILD WORTH $600 ???

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June 18, 2007 5:34:00 PM

PROCESSOR AMD Athlon™ 64 X2 Dual-Core 4400+
OPERATING SYSTEM Genuine Windows® XP Home Edition
MEMORY 2GB Dual Channel DDR2 SDRAM at 667MHz- 2DIMMs
HARD DRIVE 160GB Serial ATA Hard Drive (7200RPM) w/DataBurst Cache™
OPTICAL DRIVE 48X CD-RW/ DVD Combo Drive edit
MONITOR No Monitor edit
VIDEO CARD 256MB ATI Radeon X1300 Pro edit
SOUND Integrated 7.1 Channel Audio edit
My Accessories
FLOPPY OR MEDIA READER No Floppy Drive Included edit
MODEM No Modem edit
SPEAKERS No speakers (Speakers are required to hear audio from your system) edit
KEYBOARD No Keyboard edit
MOUSE No Mouse edit
My Software
PRODUCTIVITY Microsoft Works 8. DOES NOT INCLUDE MS WORD edit
SECURITY No Security Subscription (Norton 90-day) edit
My Support & Services
WARRANTY & SERVICE 1 Year On-site Economy Plan edit

More about : build worth 600

June 18, 2007 6:11:28 PM

No
June 18, 2007 6:29:27 PM

Thanks for the reply but can you give me some tips on why its not good for the price?
Related resources
a b B Homebuilt system
June 18, 2007 7:19:10 PM

No. Why?

1. This looks like a Dell. The PSU might barely handle your system.
2. These days, an Intel CPU offers better performance. Check Tom's CPU charts.
3. Hard drive is small for this price; look for 250GB or better.
4. DVD Read-Only. A writer adds what, $5 these days?
5. Memory could be 800MHz.
6. That video card is a mutt; tolerable in a laptop maybe, but not a gaming desktop.
7. This looks like a Dell. The PSU wouldn't handle upgrades, especially to the video.

For $600 you can do better on all of those things.
June 18, 2007 7:19:37 PM

Quote:
PROCESSOR AMD Athlon™ 64 X2 Dual-Core 4400+
OPERATING SYSTEM Genuine Windows® XP Home Edition
MEMORY 2GB Dual Channel DDR2 SDRAM at 667MHz- 2DIMMs
HARD DRIVE 160GB Serial ATA Hard Drive (7200RPM) w/DataBurst Cache™
OPTICAL DRIVE 48X CD-RW/ DVD Combo Drive edit
MONITOR No Monitor edit
VIDEO CARD 256MB ATI Radeon X1300 Pro edit
SOUND Integrated 7.1 Channel Audio edit
My Accessories
FLOPPY OR MEDIA READER No Floppy Drive Included edit
MODEM No Modem edit
SPEAKERS No speakers (Speakers are required to hear audio from your system) edit
KEYBOARD No Keyboard edit
MOUSE No Mouse edit
My Software
PRODUCTIVITY Microsoft Works 8. DOES NOT INCLUDE MS WORD edit
SECURITY No Security Subscription (Norton 90-day) edit
My Support & Services
WARRANTY & SERVICE 1 Year On-site Economy Plan edit


http://secure.newegg.com/NewVersion/Shopping/Shoppingca...

Here you go, you can build the same thing yourself for $600,

plus an x1650 instead of that bapp x1300,

plus a seagate 7200.10 (perpendicular recording) instead of bapp databurst cache(whatever that is) hard drive,

plus decent coolermaster case,

plus DVD burner with lightscribe instead of bapp dvd-rom drive,

plus name brand kingston ddr2 667 instead of who knows what kind of ram,

plus solid antec 500w power supply instead of who knows what kind of power supply.

Total = $595.92

Thats why he said "no", because the components you have listed are simply not worth 600 bones.
Keep shopping :) .
Good luck :wink:
June 18, 2007 7:29:50 PM

As noted by other posters you can do better for your $, but what they forget is your Dell or whatever system is prebuilt and ready to use, whereas their systems will be assmebled by you the final user.

There is a certain satisfaction in building your own, but if you need something today to use today to cruise the 'net and do a spreadsheet then the system you described is fine. I would seriously look at upgrading the DVD system, but other than that single issue the unit will walk and talk and do computer things.
June 18, 2007 9:16:09 PM

Thanks again for everyone that is posting on my thread. It is a dell and i am very new to the "Building" process. If i can get more bang for my buck than i am going to do it but the question is will i be able to run a pc that " I " build myself or would i need tons of experience in doing so?
June 18, 2007 9:55:30 PM

I remember my first build...

Its a lot like putting together a model car or any of those tedious hobbies. If you are patient, nothing will go wrong. Neweggs great for deals and customer satisfaction with RMAs and returns is awesome. I'll see if I can find one of the thousands of general PC assembly articles that are out there. Most of the stuff is just reading from a manual, the more you know the more confident you become. If you don't haved much experience or knowledge just go slow.

I bet I was online about 4 hours a day for a month before before I actually bought my parts. You don't have to go that crazy with it but I tend to read on forums and articles that have interesting titles. You'll never know what useful things you will find to read that you can incorporate into your build. Don't forget about shipping and an operating system if you aren't using linux.

The system Pete laid out seems pretty good for you. Just make sure you get a case that you research and like, because it there much more work to do if you want to replace your case than any other component. :D 

Thermaltake has some nice starter cases though a bit expensive but worth the ease of use and good quality. Antec has some nice stuff too. Like I said, whatever floats your boat.
!