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Help for new Workstation

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August 7, 2012 3:56:08 PM

Hello!

I am new to this community. I am a mechanical engineer and need computer for mostly for Solid modeling (Solidworks) and FEA (ANSYS) not being a hardcore gamer though, I play games whenever time permits.
I am trying to build my workstation and will appreciate suggestions.

Presently, I have thought of Following

Processor : Intel Ivy Bridge Core i7-3770K
Mother Board : Intel DZH77GA-70k/ gigabyte Z77X-UD5H/ ASUSP8z77-vpro / ASUS Z77 Sabertooth (I am confused and need a serious help on this)
Cooler: Cooler master 212 Hyper Plus/ Intel
RAM: 16GB {[2x8GB] DDR-3 1600Mhz Kingston}
Graphic Card (PCI) : Nvidia Quadro 600
HDD : 1TB Seagate 7200 RPM 64MB (Help If possible)
PSU: Need Help on this too...!!

Thanks Again for your suggestion and opinions

d1g1_n1nj4

More about : workstation

August 7, 2012 7:40:58 PM

it looks like you at least have a pretty good idea about what you need. going with a professional graphics card over a consumer graphics card is definitely a good idea. in general they are more suited to rendering and 3d modeling than gaming and consumer grade cards are vice versa.

i'm not familiar with the benefits from ivybridge and other platforms but going with an i7 is a solid choice. the K models allow you to overclock in the future but you most likely will not need to.

i've had good luck with my asus motherboard (i7-920 on a asus rampage III rog). a little expensive but it has great built in features.

honestly you could probably get away with the stock cpu cooler for awhile unless you plan to overclock right off the bat. i remember the 212 being a recommended cooler but i'm not sure how it fares with current options.

make sure you match your ram sticks to your motherboards ram channels. 2, 4 or 6 sticks for dual channel, 3 or 6 for triple channel and 4 sticks for quad channel. as far as brands go, i'm happy with mushkin but everyone has their own opinion.

we use a quadro fx580 here at work. if the 600 is a step up then i would say its okay. normally i like to recommend getting one step down from whatever is bleeding edge at the moment. in this way you arent paying the premium but you still get lasting performance.

you might want to think about getting a 80-120gb ssd for boot up. this make system performance snappy. keeping current working files on a ssd will also greatly improve load/save speeds. if you plan to do this you might want a bigger ssd. once done with files or once the files will not be frequently accessed you could push them to a standard hdd data drive.

the current 3 big names in hard drives right now are wd caviar black, samsung spinpoint f3 and seagate barracuda. i would suggest 1tb drives over 1.5tb models as the latter have had reliability issues. you might want to think about raid 1 (data mirroring) if the files you will be working on are of critical importance. or at a bare minimum do daily backups to a server, disk or memory stick.

you need to do a psu calculation. there are plenty of websites which offer free web based calcuators for you to use. i highly suggest the professional level of psus from corsair. without calculating the numbers i would guesstimate a 700w-800w should be more than sufficient. remember it is always wise to have a psu capable of handling 10-20% more than the maximum load your components can draw. you do not want to run a psu at 100% capacity.

any thoughts to cases? in general a full tower with plenty of large fan slots is ideal.

how about mice, keyboards and monitors? this equipment can be just as important as the pc itself. any thoughts?
August 25, 2012 8:33:52 AM

Sorry for late reply....!!

&
Thnx dude......!!!

Also please help me should I go Xeon E5 2600 or i7 - 3770 series will work good.......

Regards,
d1g1_n1nj4
















ssddx said:
it looks like you at least have a pretty good idea about what you need. going with a professional graphics card over a consumer graphics card is definitely a good idea. in general they are more suited to rendering and 3d modeling than gaming and consumer grade cards are vice versa.

i'm not familiar with the benefits from ivybridge and other platforms but going with an i7 is a solid choice. the K models allow you to overclock in the future but you most likely will not need to.

i've had good luck with my asus motherboard (i7-920 on a asus rampage III rog). a little expensive but it has great built in features.

honestly you could probably get away with the stock cpu cooler for awhile unless you plan to overclock right off the bat. i remember the 212 being a recommended cooler but i'm not sure how it fares with current options.

make sure you match your ram sticks to your motherboards ram channels. 2, 4 or 6 sticks for dual channel, 3 or 6 for triple channel and 4 sticks for quad channel. as far as brands go, i'm happy with mushkin but everyone has their own opinion.

we use a quadro fx580 here at work. if the 600 is a step up then i would say its okay. normally i like to recommend getting one step down from whatever is bleeding edge at the moment. in this way you arent paying the premium but you still get lasting performance.

you might want to think about getting a 80-120gb ssd for boot up. this make system performance snappy. keeping current working files on a ssd will also greatly improve load/save speeds. if you plan to do this you might want a bigger ssd. once done with files or once the files will not be frequently accessed you could push them to a standard hdd data drive.

the current 3 big names in hard drives right now are wd caviar black, samsung spinpoint f3 and seagate barracuda. i would suggest 1tb drives over 1.5tb models as the latter have had reliability issues. you might want to think about raid 1 (data mirroring) if the files you will be working on are of critical importance. or at a bare minimum do daily backups to a server, disk or memory stick.

you need to do a psu calculation. there are plenty of websites which offer free web based calcuators for you to use. i highly suggest the professional level of psus from corsair. without calculating the numbers i would guesstimate a 700w-800w should be more than sufficient. remember it is always wise to have a psu capable of handling 10-20% more than the maximum load your components can draw. you do not want to run a psu at 100% capacity.

any thoughts to cases? in general a full tower with plenty of large fan slots is ideal.

how about mice, keyboards and monitors? this equipment can be just as important as the pc itself. any thoughts?

!