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Office 2010 and Office 2007

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April 28, 2011 2:22:55 PM

I currently have a legal version of Office 2007 installed on a Vista computer. I now want to install a legal version of Office 2010 on this same computer. My objective is to first get Office 2010 installed and working well, and then later to un-install Office 2007.

While trying to do this, the authentic product key was entered and accepted. The Office 2010 installation was in progress for about 50% when it displayed an error "Error 1606: Could Not Access Network Location". Tried the installation again; same error!

I checked for online solutions and read this: http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/office/forum/officev...

It says un-install Office 2007 first using "Microsoft Fix-It".

My question #1: Why should I use "Fix-It" to un-install? Why can't I un-install the traditional way by using the Control panel and un-installing the program from there?

Question #2: Why can't I install Office 2010, get it running fine, and then later un-install Office 2007 if, and only if, I want to? Is this a case of Microsoft's foreign (Indian) techs deciding what is best for the consumer and making decisions for the consumer? Reminds me of the days when Detroit used to 'decide' how cars should be designed and built with very little input from their automotive customer base!

(If Microsoft Customer Support is reading this, please respond).
April 28, 2011 5:37:56 PM

1) Presumably because their own uninstaller doesn't do everything it needs to for a clean install of 2010. So maybe it's a fault with the 2007 uninstaller or, just as likely, a problem with the 2010 installer.

2) With modern software it's almost assumed by developers that you will run a single version. Whilst Microsoft may market 2007 and 2010 as different programs, they really are just different versions using a fair amount of the same code. They also have the same design with their other software - it's tricky to have multiple versions of IE installed on one machine. They want you to use one version.

Your need for it isn't unjustified it's just unlikely to be supported. In fairness the majority of Windows users aren't going to need multiple versions installed of any software they use.
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April 28, 2011 10:29:36 PM

Rusting In Peace said:
1) Presumably because their own uninstaller doesn't do everything it needs to for a clean install of 2010. So maybe it's a fault with the 2007 uninstaller or, just as likely, a problem with the 2010 installer.

2) With modern software it's almost assumed by developers that you will run a single version. Whilst Microsoft may market 2007 and 2010 as different programs, they really are just different versions using a fair amount of the same code. They also have the same design with their other software - it's tricky to have multiple versions of IE installed on one machine. They want you to use one version.

Your need for it isn't unjustified it's just unlikely to be supported. In fairness the majority of Windows users aren't going to need multiple versions installed of any software they use.

Thank you for your response.

I am not looking to have multiple versions of MS Office running indefinitely on my computer.

What I want to do is to take a conservative approach. The computer is running Office 2007 now. I want to install Office 2010, and get it running for about one week BEFORE I uninstall Office 2007. This is logical and conservative. Didn't Microsoft management think of this? (Detroit in the software field?).

Progress and continuous improvement in any field is not achieved by a bunch of people nodding their heads and accepting the status quo. If this is an oversight on Microsoft's part, they should acknowledge it as such, and take corrective action in future releases of products.
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April 29, 2011 1:16:06 AM

I don't think it stops at Microsoft at all. I think the majority of software companies will operate in this fashion. For example, I doubt you can run multiple versions of Firefox (I'm discounting 64bit variants like Minefield and portable versions).

It probably is just an archaic way of thinking that probably arose from space restrictions / dll hell rather years ago than someone actively deciding at Microsoft that you couldn't have multiple versions installed.

What are you really gaining by having both applications installed? Just jump in and use 2010. Go for it! :) 
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April 29, 2011 1:52:32 AM

Rusting In Peace said:
I don't think it stops at Microsoft at all. I think the majority of software companies will operate in this fashion. For example, I doubt you can run multiple versions of Firefox (I'm discounting 64bit variants like Minefield and portable versions).

It probably is just an archaic way of thinking that probably arose from space restrictions / dll hell rather years ago than someone actively deciding at Microsoft that you couldn't have multiple versions installed.

What are you really gaining by having both applications installed? Just jump in and use 2010. Go for it! :) 

OK! I am convinced on this course of action.

(FYI: I was updating an old Dell laptop today and noticed that it still had the old Office XP that came preloaded. In my usual way of doing things, I had installed Office 2007 on this laptop last year. Both versions were running fine. Today, I un-installed the old Office XP Small Business edition along with Frontpage).

Thank you for your time and thoughts!
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April 29, 2011 1:58:08 AM

Best answer selected by Ubrales.
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June 27, 2011 12:16:19 AM

This topic has been closed by Area51reopened
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