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What are the extras I need to build my first system

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June 27, 2007 4:25:12 PM

I am planning to do my first ever build after the 7/22 price cuts and I need some advice.

I'd like to avoid something I call "The Home Depot Syndrome". This happens when I go to Home Depot to buy the supplies for a home project, and then I go back three more times to get all of the stuff I forgot to get the first time.

When getting what I need for my first build, I know that I need the following

case
power supply
power supply cooling fan
cpu
motherboard
memory
video card
monitor
hard drive(s)
DVD/CD burner
keyboard/mouse


The question is, what else do I need? Any special tools that I may not already have? Mounting kits? Cables that aren't included? Shop supplies? Anything else I'm not thinking of?


Please help me avoid the Home Depot Syndrome.

More about : extras build system

June 27, 2007 5:14:08 PM

a screwdriver and screws quite possibly.... No PSU cooler needed and maybe a CPU Heatsink fan. Oh yeah, maybe some speakers/headphones if you don't have.
a b B Homebuilt system
June 27, 2007 5:22:55 PM

There you go, Emp got there first. Maybe add some case fans, if the case you are getting doesn't have enough of them or you want quieter ones. The PSU cooler is generally a good idea, and it's absolutely necessary if you want to overclock.

Why don't you tell us what you're getting, so we can check for compatibility. For example some video cards require more powerful PSUs and larger cases than others.

Are you planning to overclock?

Is this a gaming computer?
Related resources
June 27, 2007 5:28:50 PM

If you are going to purchase hard drives, optical drives, etc. 'OEM' rather than 'Retail' you will also need the necessary cables for the devices.

-J.
June 27, 2007 5:29:00 PM

Get some Arctic Silver compound instead of the generic thermal compound, extra screws, motherboard risers (if needed), may want to get some rounded IDE cables if using any IDE drives, anti-static wrist band thingys. Pending on your case, may need some extra case fans. If you plan on OCing, get an after-market cooler/heat sink for all the devices you will be OCing. You may also want to consider getting at least two hard drives. It is also nice to have an air can for the occasional dust spraying. I'm not sure what the size is called, but some philips-head screwdrivers. Maybe a power supply tester if you want to make sure your power supply isn't a DOA. Get a DVI cable instead of VGA for your monitor connection. Pending on your room layout, get the appropriate cable extensions (ie: USB extensions, power cords, etc).

Number one thing to do is do your homework on the parts you are ordering. Especially your case and motherboard. Know your dimensions of each. You don't want to buy a case that will hamper what you can fit into it. You don't want to buy a motherboard that will limit you on your additions. There are many motherboards out there where you may plug in a video card and end-up blocking a PCI slot or two. Or you may need an after-market heat-sink and the combo of your case and motherboard will prevent you from mounting it correctly or even using one period.

I'm sure I'm missing something but I think that will about do it.
a c 83 B Homebuilt system
June 27, 2007 5:52:09 PM

Most motherboards come with sata, cd, and floppy cables if they are the retail versions. Look at the pictures on newegg to be certain. The oem versions will not have these things.
The retail cpu versions come with a cooler, and have a longer warranty than the oem versions. It is probably worth the few extra bucks.
Will you want a better cpu cooler? If so, check if it supplies a fan.
Get a tube of thermal interface material such as arctic silver 5. You may want to remount the stock heatsink.
Does the case include all the fans you will want? Many times, they don't.
Will you want a floppy disk unit? They are not truly necessary, but they are cheap and may make it easier to update the bios on some motherboards.
All PSU's will have an appropriate cooling fan, no separate cooler is needed.
A magnetic tip #1 or#2 screwdriver can be very helpful with motherboard mounting screws. particularly if you have fat fingers and big hands.
Don't forget to order a OS.
You may want a power strip to plug everything in.
If you are getting a printer, many do not include a usb cable.
You may want some speakers. Check if they include wires.
Check that you have enough USB ports to connect everything. If not, plan accordingly.
You are obviously connected to the internet now. Will you need a router so that the new PC can be connected at the same time? For added security, you might get one anyway. They will supply the needed cables.
---good luck---
June 27, 2007 7:16:26 PM

Wow! Thanks for the responses everybody.

Sorry about not mentioning things like speakers, USB cables, etc. I'm all set for that stuff. Basically, I was just wondering what I needed to put everything inside the case together. Also, I said a power supply cooler was on my list, but I meant a CPU cooler.

So here is what I gleaned from the above responses. If I buy the retail version of things instead of OEM, then I will just need a screwdriver, screws, and thermal compound (for what?). Everything else should be included. Is that about right?

Let me explain the system I plan to build. This will primarily be for photoshop and video editing. No gaming. It will be installed right behind the chair that I watch TV from, so it needs to be very quiet. It will need lots of hard drive space and lots of memory. I do not plan on overclocking. Because of the location, I don't want the case to light up.

So here's what I thought of getting so far:

Case: I don't know and would love suggestions. It needs to not light up like a neon sign and be very quiet. Also, I would like USB and firewire ports on the front. Also, it needs to hold at least 5 hard drives.

CPU: Intel Quad core Q6600. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115017

CPU cooler: I have no idea what to get. Primarily, I want this to be quiet. It doesn't need to cool an overclocked processor.

Power Supply: Thermaltake Toughpower 600 Watt. I am not set on this. I want a quiet power supply that will support this system. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817153033

Motherboard: No idea what to get here. Overclocking not needed. It needs to support at least 5 internal SATA hard drives. It also needs to support firewire in the front and rear. Also, I need RAID 1 support. I was thinking of maybe getting the Asus P5N-E nForce 650i SLI. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131142

Memory: I want 4 Gb of memory. It doesn't need to overclock. I was thinking getting 4 of the Patriot 1GB 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400). http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820220088

Video Card: I was thinking of the EVGA 256-P2-N541-T2 GeForce 7600GS 256MB. No gaming support needed. I would like a quiet card so maybe a card with no fan would be better. Suggestions? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130075

Monitor: Dell 24 Inch Widescreen Ultrasharp LCD. http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?c=us&l=en&s=dhs&cs=19&sku=320-4335

Hard Drive: Ultimately I will put in 5 hard drives. A system drive with a second in a RAID 1 configuration for backup. A third drive as a data drive for videos. A fourth and fifth drive in another RAID 1 configuration for photos. However, initially, I will just have 1 drive and I will attach external drives that I already have. How about the Western Digital Caviar SE16 WD5000AAKS 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM? Since this is OEM, do I have to buy extra stuff? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136073

Optical Drive: I haven't picked one out yet. It needs to have lightscribe and also burn dual layer DVD's.

Sound: I'll use onbaord sound from the motherboard. I have speakers.

Network: I'll use motherboard network connection. I will add a PCI wi-fi card.

Keyboard and Mouse: Probably the Logitech MX 3200 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16823126007

OS: Microsoft Vista Home Premium 32 bit. Don't I need to buy something OEM in order to be able to buy this OEM?


So how does this look?


Bob
June 27, 2007 7:32:28 PM

One thing: If you are planning on utilizing 4+ GB of RAM, you'll need to go 64-bit with your Operating Sytem rather than the 32-bit that you mentioned.
a b B Homebuilt system
June 27, 2007 7:38:44 PM

If you buy a motherboard and a CPU that's already plenty to qualify for an OEM version of Vista, as far as I know.

Thermal compound - this is applied on the CPU, it improves cooling.

Cases: P182 is pretty quiet and not very expensive. Silverstone TJ09 and Lian-Li (PC-73, V2000) are bigger and better but more expensive.

CPU cooler: Thermalright Ultra-120. Maybe Scythe Ninja. Avoid Zalman 9700, I just saw a comparative review that showed the 9700 at 62dB where the others were around 43dB.

Motherboard - maybe something based on the P35 chipset?

Video card - do you need support for hi-def video? Consider the 8600 series. I think there's a silent model among those.

HDD - I'd get all 5 Seagate or all 5 WD, just to avoid loading two sets of drivers. 500 GB is the sweet spot for price/performance/noise these days.

Asus DRW-1814BLT is a quiet DVD-RW drive, for example. Recent LG models are fine too. Avoid Plextor or Pioneer, they're similar but overpriced.

You need Vista 64 to really benefit from 4 GB of RAM.

You don't really need additional case fans, since you're not overclocking or including monster video cards. If you do add them, get Noctua or Scythe S-Flex.

TV Tuner? If interested, I'd recommend Hauppauge PVR-150 or PVR-500 (the second one can record two shows at the same time, or record one and display another).

Good luck!
June 27, 2007 8:15:28 PM

Quote:
One thing: If you are planning on utilizing 4+ GB of RAM, you'll need to go 64-bit with your Operating Sytem rather than the 32-bit that you mentioned.


For compatability of programs, I am going to stick with the 32 bit.

I know that I won't be able to make use of the full 4 Gb, but that's ok with me.
June 27, 2007 8:31:17 PM

Quote:
Cases: P182 is pretty quiet and not very expensive. Silverstone TJ09 and Lian-Li (PC-73, V2000) are bigger and better but more expensive.

CPU cooler: Thermalright Ultra-120.

Video card - do you need support for hi-def video? Consider the 8600 series. I think there's a silent model among those.

Asus DRW-1814BLT is a quiet DVD-RW drive, for example. Recent LG models are fine too. Avoid Plextor or Pioneer, they're similar but overpriced.


TV Tuner? If interested, I'd recommend Hauppauge PVR-150 or PVR-500 (the second one can record two shows at the same time, or record one and display another).


I had thought about the P182. A little pricey, but maybe worth it.

CPU Cooler: The Ultra 182 sounds like overkill since I am not overclocking.

Video Card: I thought the 7600 series did HD?

DVD Drive: Thanks for the recommendation. I forgot to mention that my needs for quiet are really based on the noise this thing is making while not being used. While it is being used, I am ok with some noise.

TV Tuner: Don't need it.


Bob
June 27, 2007 8:49:44 PM

I think ATI cards are generally very good for video playback. As I recall, there's a version of the X1600 out there without a fan. The Thermalright 120 is a good choice as it's a fanless cooler. You may be able to find a cheaper after-market cooler without a fan, but the Thermalright is a good choice. However, with the Antec 182 case (or even 180), you should be fine on the stock CPU cooler as you're not overclocking. The new Antec Sonata III case is very quiet as well, but I'm not sure what the retail is.
a b B Homebuilt system
June 27, 2007 8:52:50 PM

Technically, you can live with the stock cooler if you're not overclocking.

However, an aftermarket cooler will reduce noise and increase the lifetime of the CPU (at least theoretically, that's what manufacturers try hard to convince us). I suggested the Thermalright because it's quieter than most. The fact that it also happens to cool very very well is a bonus, I totally understand if you don't care about that part. :lol:  :lol: 

Guys, does he really need an aftermarket cooler at all, can we have some thoughts please?
a c 83 B Homebuilt system
June 27, 2007 9:52:26 PM

Any machine in standby mode will be virtually silent when not being used.
The advantage of an aftermarket cooler is that it will be quieter while in operation if it uses a slow 120mm fan.
Reconsider your hard disk strategy. The value of raid1 is that if there is a hardware failure, the recovery time is almost instant. It does not protect you from data loss due to operator error, such as inadvertent deletion, software failure, or malicious code such as viruses. You also pay a price in performance, since it takes two writes to update one record. The odds of a hardware failure are small. They last for 20,000 to 50,000 start/stop cycles or perhaps a million hours. The drives will be obsolete long before their expected failure time. Regardless, you need some sort of external backup for your files that can't be recovered easily. My suggestion is to start with just one large drive, and add to it as needed. Back up regularly to an external hard drive.
The Antec 182 is a very good large and quiet case that will serve you well. If you will need 4 or fewer drives as I suggested, then the Antec Solo is a smaller and cheaper but equally quiet case.
Go for a P35 based motherboard with ddr2 memory. It has plenty of sata ports and is currently the most future-proof board I know of. 4GB of memory will give you about 3.3gb with a 32-bit operating system; not bad. Today, ddr2 memory is relatively cheap. It will be a while until ddr3 can compete.
Consider the implications of oem vs retail os. oem limits you to installing it on the original motherboard ONLY. Retail lets you move the os to a new machine(only on one at a time). It's confusing, but read up on it.
Do wait, if you can, until july 22 for that q6600, the price will be much less.
June 27, 2007 10:32:44 PM

There are fanless video cards available.
Fanless Nvidia cards at The Egg
The Gigabyte cards are pretty good, I have a 7600gt from them. They finally made a passive single slot 7600gt also. XFX makes fanless cards, as does ASUS.
The SeaSonic and Corsair(same) PSUs are about as quiet as you can get.
If you aren't getting a 64bit OS than 2Gb will do just fine. Or get 2x1 Gb and 512 x 2 Gb and to 3gb of memory you can actually use and save like $50.
If you aren't overclocking the Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro will be more than sufficient. Its cheap, quiet and powerful.
June 28, 2007 12:58:48 AM

You might need some cables for connecting parts.

Floppy Drive: Power Supply Adaptor Cable Assembly
• Adds an additional small power supply for devices like internal floppy drives
Modern devices like 3·5in. drives, tape streamers and flopticals are provided with a small plug for the power supply. This cable is designed to make use of the existing power supply cables in a computer so that the number of connections can be increased.
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/1097/cab-15/4_Pin_Flo...

Optical Drive:D ual Link Internal Audio Cable with Noise Reduction Chip
• Cable for connecting 2 x optical drives (DVD/CD-ROM) to a soundcard or motherboard
• Intergrated noise reduction chip for crystal clear audio
http://www.frozencpu.com/cat/l3/g2/c36/s100/list/p1/Cab...

Also if you will most likely want to Manage all the cables inside you case, to give it better airflow for cooling.
http://www.frozencpu.com/cat/l2/g2/c34/list/p2/Cables-W...

Hope this helps you out some.
June 28, 2007 3:40:55 AM

Quote:
Wow! Thanks for the responses everybody.

Let me explain the system I plan to build. This will primarily be for photoshop and video editing. No gaming. It will be installed right behind the chair that I watch TV from, so it needs to be very quiet. It will need lots of hard drive space and lots of memory. I do not plan on overclocking. Because of the location, I don't want the case to light up.


Would suggest this graphic card, specially if you will be using Vista as OS. ASUS EN8600GT SILENT/HTDP/256M GeForce 8600GT 128-bit GDDR3 PCI Express x16 HDCP Video Card.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Mainly because of what you want and it is in compliance with the Vista OS.
1] Silent
2] TV & HDTV
3] Does not need any extra power from PSU
4] DX10

Was going to suggest another case for you to look at, but found this one instead. GIGABYTE 3D Aurora 570 GZ-FA1CA-ASS Silver 1.0 mm Aluminum body ATX Full Tower Computer Case.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

You can also get case in Black for $10 less.
Reasons why I suggest this case.
1] Silent fans
2] 5 or more HD's
3] Front Ports: USB2.0 x 2 / IEEE 1394 x 1 / HD Audio x 1

Well I hope this helps you out.
June 28, 2007 10:53:13 AM

I'd suggest saving even more on the graphics card, as you're not gaming. You can get this silent Asus X1600PRO from Newegg:
Asus X1600PRO
Also, the stock cooler will be more than adequate. It will also be plenty quiet in an Antec case. 4GB of RAM will be nice for when Vista becomes a viable option, but you could easily just stick to 2GB for now - it's more than enough for all your editing needs. Make sure you just get 533MHz (PC5400/5300) speed, as there's no point getting faster RAM unless you plan to overclock (or you get an AMD processor).
Cables: for that many hard drives, you'll definately need to be extra cables. You'll most likely get two SATA cables, an IDE cable (now redundant) and a floppy cable with the motherboard.
June 28, 2007 1:17:16 PM

I'm too lazy to look into the SPECs of what you selected but for that many drives...first, you may want to make sure your case can hold that many. Second, make sure you Power Supply has enough SATA power connections. If not you can always buy converters. Again, I don't know what it is called but it will convert your four-pin power connections (IDE or optical drives) to a SATA power connection (they sell them on NewEgg). Or, get a power supply that has that many SATA power connections. Third, make sure your MB has that many SATA ports.
June 28, 2007 2:58:44 PM

Quote:
Any machine in standby mode will be virtually silent when not being used.

The advantage of an aftermarket cooler is that it will be quieter while in operation if it uses a slow 120mm fan.

Reconsider your hard disk strategy. <snip>

Do wait, if you can, until july 22 for that q6600, the price will be much less.



Sorry, I guess I wasn't clear about what I meant by having a quiet system when it is not being used. The machine won't be in standby mode because I intend to use the 24 inch monitor along with a screen saver as a digital picture frame.

The quiet factor is exactly why I want an aftermarket cooler. I figure that in order to reduce fan noise I need to minimize the number of fans and also make sure they are quiet fans.

Backup strategy: You comments are very well thought out. I want to avoid external hard drives so everything is in one case with a minimum of external wires. However, that does not mean that I have to use RAID 1. I certainly could use backups rather than RAID 1. I haven't really decided between the two yet. I do also use Mozy for online backup.

Waiting until July 22nd is defintaly on my list of things to do. If it wasn't for that I wouldn't be considering the quad core.

Thanks for the advice.

Bob
June 28, 2007 4:04:29 PM

Just some comments, I glanced over most of the other posts and thought I could a little something to the thread for you to consider.

First, if money is an object I would reconsider a P35 board, there is no serious (and this is open for debate so don’t derail the threat) benefit at this time for the board, the 680i boards will also support Penryn in the future so aside from DDR3 ram, which isn't worth it just yet, I don't see a point so you can save a few dollars there, that is assuming you would buy a P35 board that supports both DDR2 and DDR3.

Second, if I read the post right this is the first time you have ever built a PC, that being said, stay away from ANYTHING with the names like ASUS, Gigabyte, and MSI. Nothing against the products, but the support from them is the worst out there so if you have even the tiniest problem you will be kicking yourself later.

In terms of good customer service I recommend going with an EVGA MoBo and graphics card, there service is out of this world and the have a step up option on there graphic cards that may help you later if you are going short on the card up front.

Lastly, as you are looking to save money by purchasing online I recommend going with only well known websites like newegg, frys, etc.... dealing with smaller sights that may save you only a few bucks here and there is not worth the trouble.

Beyond that, most of the posts look good, everyone has an opinion on parts so I didn't want to go over everything, just wanted to give you some food for thought!
June 28, 2007 4:14:29 PM

Quote:
There are fanless video cards available.
Fanless Nvidia cards at The Egg
If you aren't overclocking the Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro will be more than sufficient. Its cheap, quiet and powerful.


Thanks for the links. Fanless video cards sound like they would be good for keeping noise down. I'll take a look at these.

I'll also look at this cooler. Can I use a fanless one?

Bob
June 28, 2007 4:19:03 PM

Quote:
We ALWAYS strongly recommend an adequate
battery backup/uninterruptible power supply ("UPS").
Why more computer manufacturers and sellers
don't mention this more often, IS BEYOND ME!!

Another item that may not be obvious,
is to run your computer in an air-conditioned
room (it at all possible) and ideally with
a good dust filter, or separate air purifier.

A good rechargeable flashlight is a must;

This may seem minor, but I have seen
SATA data ports broken on hard drives:



Thanks for all the advice. The flashlight thought is a great one. Especially since the one I usually use at home is huge. I'll be sure to get a small one.

The UPS is something I was considering.

The air conditioning comment is funny. I live in Houston. Without AC I think my own personal lifespan might be shortened. :D 

I'll at least be careful with the SATA connectors. Once built, I don't intend to rummage around in the case much so I may not need to buy different connectors.


Bob
June 28, 2007 4:29:40 PM

Quote:
You can get this silent Asus X1600PRO from Newegg:
Asus X1600PRO

Make sure you just get 533MHz (PC5400/5300) speed, as there's no point getting faster RAM unless you plan to overclock (or you get an AMD processor).
Cables: for that many hard drives, you'll definately need to be extra cables. You'll most likely get two SATA cables, an IDE cable (now redundant) and a floppy cable with the motherboard.


Thanks for the info. I'll check out the video card. Fanless and cheap are both good things since my needs for this are modest.

I don't understand the suggestion to get 533MHz memory. Why not the 800MHz? That is what I planned to get.

Thanks for pointing out the cable needs too.


Bob
June 28, 2007 4:35:59 PM

Quote:
First, if money is an object I would reconsider a P35 board, there is no serious (and this is open for debate so don’t derail the threat) benefit at this time for the board, the 680i boards will also support Penryn in the future so aside from DDR3 ram, which isn't worth it just yet, I don't see a point so you can save a few dollars there, that is assuming you would buy a P35 board that supports both DDR2 and DDR3.

Second, if I read the post right this is the first time you have ever built a PC, that being said, stay away from ANYTHING with the names like ASUS, Gigabyte, and MSI. Nothing against the products, but the support from them is the worst out there so if you have even the tiniest problem you will be kicking yourself later.

In terms of good customer service I recommend going with an EVGA MoBo and graphics card, there service is out of this world and the have a step up option on there graphic cards that may help you later if you are going short on the card up front.

Lastly, as you are looking to save money by purchasing online I recommend going with only well known websites like newegg, frys, etc.... dealing with smaller sights that may save you only a few bucks here and there is not worth the trouble.


Hey, great comments!

I don't know much about the pros and cons of the P35 vs. 680i boards. However, saving money is definately a good thing. My main thoughts for where money will be spent on this system are on the following:

Big Monitor
Lots of Hard Drives
Fast Processor
Lots of Memory
Quiet Operation

If P35 doesn't help me much in these pursuits, then I can save some money there.

Thanks for the support info. This is information I did not know.

With regards to vendors, I'll probably stick to NewEgg and Amazon for online vendors. I also happen to live just a few miles from a Fry's, so I'll probably get some stuff there too.


Bob
June 28, 2007 5:12:14 PM

Quote:
First, if money is an object I would reconsider a P35 board, there is no serious (and this is open for debate so don’t derail the threat) benefit at this time for the board, the 680i boards will also support Penryn in the future so aside from DDR3 ram, which isn't worth it just yet, I don't see a point so you can save a few dollars there, that is assuming you would buy a P35 board that supports both DDR2 and DDR3.

Second, if I read the post right this is the first time you have ever built a PC, that being said, stay away from ANYTHING with the names like ASUS, Gigabyte, and MSI. Nothing against the products, but the support from them is the worst out there so if you have even the tiniest problem you will be kicking yourself later.

In terms of good customer service I recommend going with an EVGA MoBo and graphics card, there service is out of this world and the have a step up option on there graphic cards that may help you later if you are going short on the card up front.

Lastly, as you are looking to save money by purchasing online I recommend going with only well known websites like newegg, frys, etc.... dealing with smaller sights that may save you only a few bucks here and there is not worth the trouble.


Hey, great comments!

I don't know much about the pros and cons of the P35 vs. 680i boards. However, saving money is definately a good thing. My main thoughts for where money will be spent on this system are on the following:

Big Monitor
Lots of Hard Drives
Fast Processor
Lots of Memory
Quiet Operation

If P35 doesn't help me much in these pursuits, then I can save some money there.

Thanks for the support info. This is information I did not know.

With regards to vendors, I'll probably stick to NewEgg and Amazon for online vendors. I also happen to live just a few miles from a Fry's, so I'll probably get some stuff there too.


Bob

I am not fully immersed in the P35 boards to date but from what I seen a good board from a reputable manufacturer, P35, that will support both DDR2 and DDR3 will cost about 225 and up. There are a few simple 680i boards on the market, I believe EGVA has one out, that will do the job,

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Now if you can get a nice P35 board around 150 - 160 that supports both types of memory and has a nice backing behind it I say go for it.

Also, if you are running RAID then I would actually have to suggest you may want to go with an Intel based chipset. I have read that their RAID is second to none.

It is all relative....
June 28, 2007 5:38:34 PM

Quote:
http://www.tomshardware.com/2007/06/19/eight_p35-ddr2_m...

Eight P35-DDR2 Motherboards Compared

DDR3 is just not catching on as predicted by
the DRAM manufacturers. Motherboard vendors
are just not very excited about it, reportedly.


Sincerely yours,
/s/ Paul Andrew Mitchell
Webmaster, Supreme Law Library
http://www.supremelaw.org/


The only company I can really give a good name to is Abit, but I never had to call on there support line so I don't know how they are, as for MSI, ASUS, and Gigabyte, well I stand by my first post, good boards, in many cases great boards, but they have been known to have issues, as all vendors have, but in the end, they all have bad customer service, I would say ASUS is the worse for customer service, followed by Gigabyte, and then MSI, this is in part from my experience and several posts I have read.

It looks like, from the post, that the Abit board did okay, the price isn’t too bad either, a nice mid point for a good board.
June 28, 2007 10:36:45 PM

On the CPU cooler front, get a Noctua NH-U12F. That's what I'm getting for my next build for the sole reason that it's uber quiet. It may not be fanless, but the fan is very good at 12dB. I'd also recommend against a P35 motherboard; when you come to next upgrade, chances are that new technology advancements will mean you need a new motherboard anyway. eVGA have good customer support, but I'd equally recommend Gigabyte. Why? Because loads of people on here have Gigabyte DS3 boards, so they'll be able to help if you happen to have any problems.
On the graphics card, I'd say get either an Asus 7600 or Asus X1600PRO (both fanless).
June 28, 2007 11:06:59 PM

Quote:
On the CPU cooler front, get a Noctua NH-U12F. That's what I'm getting for my next build for the sole reason that it's uber quiet. It may not be fanless, but the fan is very good at 12dB. I'd also recommend against a P35 motherboard; when you come to next upgrade, chances are that new technology advancements will mean you need a new motherboard anyway. eVGA have good customer support, but I'd equally recommend Gigabyte. Why? Because loads of people on here have Gigabyte DS3 boards, so they'll be able to help if you happen to have any problems.
On the graphics card, I'd say get either an Asus 7600 or Asus X1600PRO (both fanless).


Thanks for the suggestions. I'll definately take a look into the Noctua becuase 12dB is excellent.

Due to cost, I'm leaning away from the P35. So if not the P35 chipset, which one? And which board?
June 29, 2007 12:11:55 AM

Hate to say this but it depends,

Are you going RAID and concerned about RAID performance, if so, go with an Intel chipset as they do better the NVIDIA out right now.

If you are thinking SLi that go with the 680i chipset out right now.

Really it is open my friend. As for me, I picked up the 680i chipset. But I build two computers at once, one for me and the wife, and I bought two 8800GTX cards at the same time. Now in about a year I will upgrade one system and than run the second system with the other GTX card, thus saving a few dollars and not needing to buy two new cards. Sure I suspect the system with the new card will have an edge but at the end of the day it isn’t a big deal as I will more than likely upgrade in another year after that anyway.
a c 83 B Homebuilt system
June 29, 2007 12:16:11 AM

The P965 is probably the best current basis for a basic board. Consider an Intel board, they seem to be rock solid, but they generally have no overclocking capabilities which is why they are not much favored by posters here. Still, I would consider the P35 boards because they can have more usb ports, and are likely to be able to handle some future processors.
June 29, 2007 11:21:39 AM

No overclocking is a bit of an overstatement. The Gigabyte P965 DS3 board is one the best overclocking boards available, and very good for the money. Try and get a rev 3.3 board, as I think they support 1333FSB processors (in case you see one you like after the July 22nd releases).
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