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What's the best way to construct buildings with scenery ti..

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June 8, 2004 11:59:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.rctycoon (More info?)

I decided a few nights ago to really go all out with my theming in
scenario design mode, so it would all be constructed on day one of the
park. I created an Asian area and wanted to construct a very large
Oriental palace.

So I laid out an area of bamboo plinth tiles in a cross as the
footprint for it. Each "leg" of the cross was 8 tiles wide and 16
tiles (maybe more) long. The legs would each have a section 1 wall
panel high, a section 3 panels high, meeting at the intersection,
which would be 5 wall panels high, to give the structure a tiered,
multi-story effect.

Good God. I don't know which I lost first, my vision or my mind. I
managed to get the walls all up after considerable effort (4 hours).
But trying to line up the roof sections and then lay flat panels
across the roof is impossible. Due to the isometric viewpoint, I'd
lay tiles as best I could, then rotate to check that they were in the
right spots only to find they were simply floating in air, nowhere
near where I wanted them to be. I gave up.

Is there some systematic way to approach this? It seems impossible to
me.

I don't understand why scenery panels can't be laid like elevated
footpaths, where you put down the first tile and then specify a
direction to build in and then just click an icon to build it and
automatically go to the next location in that direction.

I'm contemplating simply raising blocks of terrain to form a solid
interior for the structure, and then simply laying the wall panels
around the outside of it, like a shell. This would eliminate the
possibility of not orienting the panel in all three dimensions since
you can't accidentally build panels in the solid interior.

Any ideas?
June 9, 2004 11:18:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.rctycoon (More info?)

>
> I'm contemplating simply raising blocks of terrain to form a solid
> interior for the structure, and then simply laying the wall panels
> around the outside of it, like a shell. This would eliminate the
> possibility of not orienting the panel in all three dimensions since
> you can't accidentally build panels in the solid interior.
>

If anyone is interested, this method was an order of magnitude easier.
Not a walk in the park, but easier.
Anonymous
June 11, 2004 4:39:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.rctycoon (More info?)

In article <18df9af1.0406081859.2da5590@posting.google.com>, jmatt@no-
nonsense-mortgage.com says...
> I decided a few nights ago to really go all out with my theming in
> scenario design mode, so it would all be constructed on day one of the
> park. I created an Asian area and wanted to construct a very large
> Oriental palace.
>
> So I laid out an area of bamboo plinth tiles in a cross as the
> footprint for it. Each "leg" of the cross was 8 tiles wide and 16
> tiles (maybe more) long. The legs would each have a section 1 wall
> panel high, a section 3 panels high, meeting at the intersection,
> which would be 5 wall panels high, to give the structure a tiered,
> multi-story effect.
>
> Good God. I don't know which I lost first, my vision or my mind. I
> managed to get the walls all up after considerable effort (4 hours).
> But trying to line up the roof sections and then lay flat panels
> across the roof is impossible. Due to the isometric viewpoint, I'd
> lay tiles as best I could, then rotate to check that they were in the
> right spots only to find they were simply floating in air, nowhere
> near where I wanted them to be. I gave up.
>
> Is there some systematic way to approach this? It seems impossible to
> me.
>
> I don't understand why scenery panels can't be laid like elevated
> footpaths, where you put down the first tile and then specify a
> direction to build in and then just click an icon to build it and
> automatically go to the next location in that direction.
>
> I'm contemplating simply raising blocks of terrain to form a solid
> interior for the structure, and then simply laying the wall panels
> around the outside of it, like a shell. This would eliminate the
> possibility of not orienting the panel in all three dimensions since
> you can't accidentally build panels in the solid interior.
>
> Any ideas?
>
Not sure if this is helpful as I'm not sure where you went wrong, but
when laying scenery once you have one piece at the correct height, if
you hover the pointer over it and hold control then anything else you
place down will be at the same height until you release control. Hope
that helps...



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