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best way to store a processor?

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July 1, 2007 1:56:50 AM

Hey guys, i have to RMA my motherboard and I don't knwo how to store the processor while the new motherboard is coming in... what's the best way to store it?

(the old packaging got crushed while I was moving out of my apartment)

Thanks a lot

More about : store processor

July 1, 2007 2:18:10 AM

Get antistatic plastic bags. It will do. After you put it in the bag, get a card board box to put it in. Put the box in where its dark, without direct sun rays, without a heatsource close to it.
a b V Motherboard
July 1, 2007 2:21:39 AM

Upside down in a rarely used desk drawer.
Related resources
July 1, 2007 2:50:54 AM

Quote:
Upside down in a rarely used desk drawer.
Oh yeah? I say upside down on a high shelf, in a box in the dark. :wink:

Seriously, upside down someplace safe, in a stat bag if you have one. Please keep your sticky fingers off of the pins.
a b V Motherboard
July 1, 2007 3:03:31 AM

Just trying to save the cost of a bag and a box. It's only for a few days...

July 1, 2007 3:18:06 AM

what if there's thermal paste on it? should i put a piece of paper towel over the paste and then into the static bag?
July 1, 2007 3:23:35 AM

As Newf said, throw it in a drawer. It's only a couple of days, it isn't like it really matters. CPU's aren't that delicate. The only things to really be careful of is to make sure nothing gets on the pins and to make sure you ground yourself to something before you touch the CPU and you'll be fine. Even that is taking some pretty hefty precautions.

Just for example, I accidentally left a processor in a cardb.oard box with no bagging or anything outside and it rained.. the box was filled with water and the processor was soaked. I let it dry out for a while, cleaned the pins with isopropyl alcohol, and it worked fine. While I'm not saying that's how you should treat your processor, don't freak out about storing it. Think about what it goes through while in the actual computer: rapid temperature changes, dust all over the place, and many pounds of pressure placed on it by the heatsink

In short, just throw it in a drawer and don't worry about it.



edit in response to your new post: if there is paste on it, you're going to want to clean that off with 90%+ isopropyl alcohol.. you can't reuse it. You'll also want to clean off your heatsink and apply a new batch when you get the new motherboard.
July 1, 2007 3:38:22 AM

great thanks guys
July 1, 2007 3:40:04 AM

A place where your children, wife and other stupid people can not find it.

Seriously the static control bag is needed for shipping due to the production of static electricity due to contact friction of the packing materials. The manufacturer may suggest using the original packing material or static control bags, but from a practical perspective the storage of the CPU could be any safe place that is not conductive.

In my business I am bench testing a beta version of a digital controller. The spare controller is stored on a wooden shelf above the equipment item. I swap out boards on a regular basis and have no problems. The manufacturer of those boards actually makes a batch and stores them on a wooden cart on their production line. Obviously the employees work on static control mats etc, but the storage of the controllers is actually quite casual as long as the storage place is not highly electrically conductive.
July 1, 2007 5:08:52 AM

Quote:
A place where your children, wife and other stupid people can not find it.


Hey you shouldn't be saying things like that. Don't call his children, wife and other people stupid~~!

just joking.
July 1, 2007 5:08:58 AM

Uh, I was just joking around.
July 1, 2007 5:09:52 AM

Wow that was a quick reply. It only took you 1 second to write something.
July 1, 2007 5:15:30 AM

Quote:
A place where your children, wife and other stupid people can not find it.


Hey you shouldn't be saying things like that. Don't call his children, wife and other people stupid~~!

just joking.

You are correct. I should have said "a place where your children, wife, stupid people AND the family dog can not find it"

Can you imagine the vet bill? Yes, doctor, the darn dog really did chew up my CPU and now he is passing metal poop.
July 1, 2007 5:21:48 AM

LOL.. Also don't let any household feline piss on it. Someone in this forum reported that their roommate's cat urinated on his computer while he was upgrading and asking how to clean off computer.
July 1, 2007 5:29:06 AM

Quote:
LOL.. Also don't let any household feline piss on it. Someone in this forum reported that their roommate's cat urinated on his computer while he was upgrading and asking how to clean off computer.


A few years back there was a book called "101 uses for a dead cat".

I think I would find that book and use it if the kitty pissed on my equipment.
July 1, 2007 5:49:40 AM

How about Kitties destruction for Dummies
July 1, 2007 6:26:34 AM

According to the Baron, just stuff it into a piece of styrofoam... That must be appropriate, as the Baron is the most knowledgeable poster left on these forums!

Me, I'm dumb. At the least, I'd get an anti-static bag to store it in, and put it up in a kid-proof area if such animals were running around.

Sunlight won't hurt it, nor UV, etc. I would, however keep it away from 50k gauss mag. fields...

Static will kill a cpu.

But hey, its your money... Just stuff it in a sock drawer, and don't ever bother to change your oil.
July 1, 2007 6:34:03 AM

Uh, is it LGA or the pin type? LGA you'd be fine just putting it in an antistatic bag that you can pick up from Fry's for a couple bucks. If it's pin, I'd try to find something to put the pins in. Normal styrofoam isn't good because it can cause static. Maybe some soft cardboard (not sure if that will cause static)...
July 1, 2007 6:35:06 AM

Love your post count, Croc.
July 1, 2007 6:36:41 AM

Quote:
According to the Baron, just stuff it into a piece of styrofoam... That must be appropriate, as the Baron is the most knowledgeable poster left on these forums!


I guess that means Baron is a complete idiot.
July 1, 2007 6:41:04 AM

Quote:
Maybe some soft cardboard (not sure if that will cause static)...


In theory, any substance could generate a static charge.

However, cardboard is a wood product. And wood is not a great conductor of electricity (as compared to ole let's say ... copper wire ) and the static charge capacity of cardboard is pretty low. That said, I would be worried about bending the pins when I pressed the pins into the cardboard.
July 1, 2007 6:44:46 AM

Thanks for bringing that to my attention... Brings up thoughts of some former posters and their '1337' xlation calculators.

Oh well, doesn't matter now... They are gone, as is the number.

Does anyone have a link to the old stickies that Mpilchfamily had about psu's? They seem to have disappeared.
July 1, 2007 6:56:46 AM

One might also go to one's local computer build it shop, and ask them for an empty cpu shipping container... They probably throw out a few dozen a week. All one needs is the oem packaging, and an anti-static bag. The oem container will protect the pins, and SHOULD also do the job for static. But hey, I'm kind of a belts / suspenders type.

@Sealboy and Stevied... I'd not like the idea of cardboard. 'safer' is not safe. If cardboard was good, the manufacturer's would use it to ship cpu's.
July 1, 2007 7:08:22 AM

I work at Fry's, and all the OEM processors are stored in small clear plastic containers which I doubt are antistatic. The LGA ones have this black cover on the bottom, but the Athlon's don't, and they seem to work just fine.

EDIT: WOOT 1000 POSTS.
July 1, 2007 7:25:30 AM

Poly-olethene if memory serves... And will be quite the container for the OP's CPU. Wouldn't have a 3m logo on it, would it? Nevermind, other mfg's make a very similar product.
July 1, 2007 7:30:57 AM

Nope, they're just simply clear snap-shut cases that come in brown boxes. They have a universal design that more or less fits any CPU. As far as I can tell, they've been using the same cases since the Socket A Athlons.

EDIT: Grammar.
a b V Motherboard
July 1, 2007 10:12:15 PM

Quote:
...Just stuff it in a sock drawer, and don't ever bother to change your oil.
You change the oil in your socks?
BTW, leave Baron out of this. His storage method would work just fine...
July 2, 2007 3:13:19 AM

Quote:
...Just stuff it in a sock drawer, and don't ever bother to change your oil.
You change the oil in your socks?
BTW, leave Baron out of this. His storage method would work just fine...Newf, I hate to break it to you but Baron's storage method would be a good way to fry a CPU. He was referring to regular styrofoam, which does hold a static charge, as was pointed in a previous thread. If you want to use foam it must specifically be antistatic foam, not some packing peanuts.

Antistatic Foam Cushioning Material, 12in. x 75ft. Roll specs
http://shopping.msn.com/specs/shp/?itemId=33214288

@ Sealboy As for pressing the pins into cardboard, there is an extremely good likelihood that you will bend the pins. That would be a lot of fun to fix.

@OP Put the CPU back in the socket and wipe off the thermal paste, then set it upside down on a high shelf, skip the stat bag altogether, no big deal.
July 2, 2007 4:07:03 AM

I said soft cardboard. I know that cardboard carries the risk of bent pins, but if you do it correctly it will work.
July 2, 2007 4:10:01 AM

Quote:
I said soft cardboard. I know that cardboard carries the risk of bent pins, but if you do it correctly it will work.
Not to be a dick, but could you give me an example of this soft cardboard.
July 2, 2007 4:34:05 AM

It's the type that's not hard.
July 2, 2007 4:38:09 AM

Quote:
It's the type that's not hard.


Does soft cardboard come from Soft Dakota?

Seriously, what grade of cardboard are you referring to?
July 2, 2007 4:41:42 AM

This is getting out of hand...

I didn't mean any specific grade. All I meant was that you use your common sense to select a cardboard that won't break off your pins when you put the CPU in.

Since there are obviously better alternatives, and my recommendation was as a last resort anyways, let's just drop it, fine?
July 2, 2007 5:32:53 AM

Quote:
This is getting out of hand...
Sorry, I didn't mean to bust your balls. I was just concerned that someone might try to stick their CPU in some Cardboard in a ham fisted fashion and bend the pins. As I am sure you know the pins are pretty delicate.
July 2, 2007 6:10:13 AM

Put it in the Dog House and confuse the dog :lol:  :lol: 
July 2, 2007 6:11:24 AM

Yeah, I have an Athlon so I know how touchy the pins are...

For that matter, forcing the CPU in anywhere would be bad...
July 2, 2007 10:28:09 AM

@ CROC he wnt over to the dark side :D  and took his PSU stickies with him. You can find them here:

http://www.x c p u s.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?s=5308bcc17a146f71d578067e762d558a&f=58

Just remove the blanks between the letters. For some reason it gets censored ( thought this was a free country :? )
July 2, 2007 4:48:21 PM

WTF? Did everyone just get up and leave?
July 2, 2007 10:38:17 PM

Yeah I guess some (a lot :? ) of Tom's regulars went there. If you look through the forum there you will see some familiar names. What I don't get is why not leave the stickies. From what I gathered Mpilchfamily did not have issues here. Must have missed something.
July 3, 2007 5:43:43 PM

I'm going to take my ball and go home. WTF?
July 4, 2007 5:18:20 AM

Quote:
I work at Fry's, and all the OEM processors are stored in small clear plastic containers which I doubt are antistatic. The LGA ones have this black cover on the bottom, but the Athlon's don't, and they seem to work just fine.

EDIT: WOOT 1000 POSTS.


wow i wish i worked there!
do you get discounts on stuff??
July 4, 2007 5:41:40 AM

Discount varies from item-to-item, basically you get half the profit off.

I work in Accessory Sales, soon E-Cage. Accessory sales is a glorified name for stock boy. I heard E-Cage is boring but a LOT less work so I'm happy to transfer (same pay). I really want to be a salesman, but I'm only there for the summer so they won't let me. I'd actually like working as a salesman, so far it's been just ok.
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
July 4, 2007 7:17:17 AM

I see that many people are discussing anti-stat materials. Essentially for something to be considered anti-stat, it must conduct electricity. This keeps potentials (voltage) from developing between contacts. If all the contacts are kept at the same potential, then no current will flow between contacts inside the semi-conductor. Using insulators like regular styrofoam allow potential to exist between the contacts. Should the potential be great enough to find a path of conductance through the semi-conductor, this is when damage to the semi-conductor occurs. If you could ground all the pins to one another, that would be the best protection. Materials like anti-stat foam (used to press the legs of IC's into for shipping) have fairly low resistance. I just measured a piece in my lab, putting the leads 1" apart, the resistance is under 2K ohms. So as you can imagine, the pins of an IC are very close together (much closer than 1") so the effective resistance between contacts is very low.

A lot has been said about using anti-stat materials and being ESD safe. I have been working in the field of electronics for years and I have not been able to conclude that static electricity has damaged any semiconductor that I have worked with. That said I think caution is advised considering the expense of the items we are discussing. Many people use compressed air in some form or other to clean their computers. Guess what? Plain compressed air is a huge creator of static. Many of you have used it though and not had any problems (as have I). Compressed air sold in the can sold for cleaning electronics usually has some sort of liquid or additive that conducts slightly, keeping static from developing. Of course this additive needs to evaporate quickly and not leave a residue behind for obvious reasons.

As for me, if I am storing a piece of electronics for any length of time, I put it into a anti-stat bag, or press it into a piece of anti-stat foam. Whether this is absolutely necessary, I can't say for sure. It's really up to you, but I think better safe than sorry. If you do any amount of upgrading and or building of computer, you will have an anti-stat bag somewhere close at hand. If you are shipping anything electronic be sure to use the anti-stat bags they came in, your warranty being honored could depend on it.
July 4, 2007 9:00:52 PM

put it in anti static bag, then into a box. Dig a hole in your back yard and burry it.
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
July 4, 2007 9:43:08 PM

Very Good!

Plastics, except specificaly treated, is one of the worst ofenders of static.
Use to have a chart that compared different material ability to take on a charge. example just peeling off scotch tape can develope 100V potential.

Very Few individuals would EVER know if a component was damaged by ESD - I suspect a fair percentage of DOA's, and components such as Memory, CPU's and Motherboard that failed after a week or even upto 6 months (est higher percentage in this last catagory) are do to esd damage.

No company is going to spend the amount of money, on a $500 RMA, to check for ESD damage. NASA is the one one that does this on failed IC's, and this is only done one Space Flight Hardware - The reason is to verify that it is not a design/manif flaw.

PS Note I DO NOT buy any Memory, or CPU that was stored, or handled improperly - Had to sit thru to many ESD training sessions
August 10, 2009 3:47:35 PM

Zorg said:
Quote:
This is getting out of hand...
Sorry, I didn't mean to bust your balls. I was just concerned that someone might try to stick their CPU in some Cardboard in a ham fisted fashion and bend the pins. As I am sure you know the pins are pretty delicate.


Just take a piece of cardboard about the same size as the processor. Next lay the processor pin down to the cardboard but don't try to press it in. Next take a piece of tape and wrap the two together! Works great!
!