Memory for overclocking Intel 965 chipset(title changed)

I'm building my first rig and so far I have almost everything except my memory. Currently I have an E6320, 1.86GHz 4M shared L2 Cache, with this heatsink Thermaltake CL-p0378 Silent Cooler. I'm planning on buying two gigs of RAM, on a 965P-DS3 (REV 3.3) MoBo. Here is the list of RAM that I can buy LINK thats compatible, I don't know much about OCing but I plan to read about it in the future. For now i need your help to decide.

I heard this CPU runs stable around 3-3.2Ghz, but im not too sure if that too much for the CPU, i'm looking for something that wont decrease the life of the CPU. THANKS IN ADVANCE

ps. in the next posts can someone explain how it works, doesn't have to be in detail, but the main idea..
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More about memory overclocking intel chipset title changed
  1. no one? :?
  2. Arright, overclocking is basically turning up the... uh.. metaphorical "speed knob" on your computer. Thats how I describe it to my computer-illiterate friends who ask how many "gigabytes" my computer runs at 8O :evil:

    Anyway, most overclocking (i.e. all overclocking done after the year... idk... 2000 or so) is done via BIOS... You go in, *slowly* crank up the speeds, and soon have a much faster system. You can find many guides and stuff on this site, and others. Thats just a very vague overview. I'd recommend checking out Wuzy's OC'ing guide... it won't have your exact processor model, but it'll give you some guidelines to go on.

    All overclocking decreases the lifetime of your CPU. However, this is not a problem. I've heard that a CPU is meant to live about 12 yrs or so... Overclocking may kick it down to like 6? Point is, your system will run out of usefulness before it dies from overclocking... there are "dangers" involved, but components are beastly enough that they can take it, as long as their properly maintenance (like kept at reasonable temps, etc.)

    About the RAM, those would be good choices, but I don't think that the board is that specific... it seems like it should support more flavors. I haven't been following the RAM game for a while, so another poster would probably be able to offer a better recommendation... but... any more questions? Anything else you need?
  3. hey, thanks a lot for taking the time to reply, I appreciate it.
  4. Overclocking is like hitting the Turbo button on your 386
  5. hey chris i just built my new rig with an e6420 and i went with this Corsair on my DS3: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145015

    It's got great latencies and overclocks very well when/if you decide to do that in the future. Hope this helps.
  6. Quote:
    Overclocking is like hitting the Turbo button on your 386


    lol I actually know what you're talking about :lol: My friend had a Turbo button :lol:

    Overclocking is like... speeding in your car. :wink:
  7. Overclocking is like shagging your bird harder than usual. Its better but it doesn't last as long. I had a turbo button on a very old rig, WHAT DID IT DO??
  8. Engaged turbo, DUH :roll:
  9. Yeh but did it didnt make a difference?
  10. Um.... probably not a big one... my friend and I just pressed it as a joke. The whole system was a joke; we had it like 100 yrs later
  11. Quote:
    Engaged turbo, DUH :roll:

    LMFAO!
  12. Eh?
  13. Quote:
    Eh?


    :?: :?: :?:
  14. Quote:
    I had a turbo button on a very old rig, WHAT DID IT DO??
    Wiki to the rescue

    Quote:
    personal computers, the Turbo button changes the effective speed of the system. It usually accomplishes this by either adjusting the CPU clock speed directly, or by turning off the processor's cache, forcing it to wait on slow main memory every time. The button was generally present on older systems, and was designed to allow the user to play older games that depended on processor speed for their timing. Systems could also use the keyboard combination of ctrl-alt-+/-, '+' switching turbo OFF and '-' switching it ON. Of course, calling it a "turbo" button when its function slows the system down can be a bit misleading, but the button was usually set up so the system would be at full speed when the button was "on". A turbo button is no longer seen on most mainstream personal computers

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turbo_button
  15. "no longer seen on most mainstream computers"


    WTF.


    Give me one example WIKIPIDIA? Just ONE where the turbo button is still in use.
  16. Quote:
    Give me one example WIKIPIDIA? Just ONE where the turbo button is still in use.


    It was saying that they WEREN'T in use anymore.
  17. A turbo button is no longer seen on most mainstream personal computers


    And i was saying.....
  18. Quote:
    A turbo button is no longer seen on most mainstream personal computers


    And i was saying.....


    Arright. Gotcha. Just makin' sure we were on the same page :)
  19. Quote:
    Thus, if the FSB is 200 MHz and
    the base DRAM is 400 MHz, then
    the FSB:DRAM ratio is 1:2 i.e. 200:400.


    Not exactly, good post except for this. Modern CPU's are quad pumped which means they send information 4 times per clock so a 200 Mhz FSB is 800 Mhz effective, Likewise 400 Mhz (D)ouble (D)ata (R)ate RAM sends information twice per clock giving it an effecive speed of 800 Mhz which would make the FSB:DRAM ratio 1:1.
  20. i'm overwhelmed, thanks a lot for the info, supreme.
  21. Quote:
    I'm building my first rig and so far I have almost everything except my memory. Currently I have an E6320, 1.86GHz 4M shared L2 Cache, with this heatsink Thermaltake CL-p0378 Silent Cooler. I'm planning on buying two gigs of RAM, on a 965P-DS3 (REV 3.3) MoBo. Here is the list of RAM that I can buy LINK thats compatible, I don't know much about OCing but I plan to read about it in the future. For now i need your help to decide.


    A better title for your post would have been "Memory for overclocking Intel 965 chipset", instead of "need help", because duh, that much is implied any time anyone posts to ask anything.

    Quote:
    I heard this CPU runs stable around 3-3.2Ghz, but im not too sure if that too much for the CPU, i'm looking for something that wont decrease the life of the CPU. THANKS IN ADVANCE


    Then you must underclock it lower than stock speed. Literally, there is no magic idea that you get perfect life from stock speed but that it drastically goes down from overclocking. Any clockspeed and heat is a choice, and life goes up choosing LOWER than stock speed just as it goes down above stock speed.

    TO be practical, forget your idea of life for a moment and just focus on what o'c you can achieve with your heatsink, your ambient temps, while keeping it under 60C at full load. That is good enough for many years of use, typically the PSU or motherboard fails first, not a moderately o'c CPU unless the heatsink falls off or fan fails, things that have nothing to do with o'c.
  22. Quote:
    Overclocking is like hitting the Turbo button on your 386


    I remember that, but I was never sure if it actually did anything useful.

    My first PC was a 386SX 40. I still recall being shocked that Star Control 2 took a whole 9 megs of disk space on my 40 meg Connor drive. I might have had the 486DLC 40 by then, but it was so long ago....

    Is overclocking really worth it?
  23. The turbo button slowed down the system so it could run apps that used the older processor speeds at timings in games instead of realtime clocking. For example it made games play correctly when used on newer systems.
  24. Quote:
    Standards are important,
    particularly in order to avoid
    using different terms to
    describe the same thing


    I agree and to show your point I'm attaching a couple of screenshots to help the OP understand your point.



    The first one shows that my RAM is running at a 1:1 ratio at 400 Mhz when in reality it's running at 800 Mhz to produce that 1:1 ratio. You'll notice the Dual in the top right corner of the first picture which means it's running in dual channel mode therefore 800 Mhz effective. I had to lower the OC from my sig because it's summer and pretty warm in my computer room, just one more thing to consider when overclocking is make sure your ambient temps aren't too high.
  25. Quote:
    Is overclocking really worth it?

    Yes.

    Quote:
    The turbo button slowed down the system so it could run apps that used the older processor speeds at timings in games instead of realtime clocking. For example it made games play correctly when used on newer systems.


    Nah, its a bit confusing, but thats not what it actually did. When the turbo button was DISENGAGED, the computer ran slower... i believe the article said something like, "It was set up so it ran fastest when engaged." Look at the wiki again.
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