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Viewership numbers from the GAO

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Anonymous
March 5, 2005 10:59:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<http://broadcastengineering.com/newsletters/rfupdate/20...;

Just to counter bob's lies and distortions:

At a Feb. 17 hearing, Mark Goldstein, GAO Director, Physical
Infrastructure, revealed to the subcommittee findings of a survey it had
commissioned to determine how many viewers might require a set-top box
and the cost of subsidizing those devices. Among the findings he
reported were:

* 19 percent, roughly 21 million U.S. households rely exclusively
on free over-the-air television
* 57 percent, nearly 64 million households view via cable
* 19 percent, or about 22 million subscribe to a DBS service
* 48 percent of OTA households have incomes under $30,000
* 29 percent of cable and DBS households have incomes under $30,000
* 6 percent of OTA households have incomes exceeding $100,000
* 13 percent of cable and DBS households have incomes exceeding
$100,000

It doesn't take a genius, though bob still can't figure it out, one of
the major reasons HDTV rollout has been slow is the cost of the display
and receiver. Now that receivers will be integrated into most large sets
and the prices of large sets has dropped out of the stratosphere, look
for the uptake rate to increase.

Matthew

--
Thermodynamics and/or Golf for dummies: There is a game
You can't win
You can't break even
You can't get out of the game

More about : viewership numbers gao

Anonymous
March 7, 2005 7:23:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Matthew L. Martin" <nothere@notnow.never> wrote in message
news:112jb9l2qufji61@corp.supernews.com...
> <http://broadcastengineering.com/newsletters/rfupdate/20...;
>
> Just to counter bob's lies and distortions:
>
> At a Feb. 17 hearing, Mark Goldstein, GAO Director, Physical
> Infrastructure, revealed to the subcommittee findings of a survey it had
> commissioned to determine how many viewers might require a set-top box and
> the cost of subsidizing those devices. Among the findings he reported
> were:
>
> * 19 percent, roughly 21 million U.S. households rely exclusively on
> free over-the-air television
> * 57 percent, nearly 64 million households view via cable
> * 19 percent, or about 22 million subscribe to a DBS service
> * 48 percent of OTA households have incomes under $30,000
> * 29 percent of cable and DBS households have incomes under $30,000
> * 6 percent of OTA households have incomes exceeding $100,000
> * 13 percent of cable and DBS households have incomes exceeding
> $100,000
>
> It doesn't take a genius, though bob still can't figure it out, one of the
> major reasons HDTV rollout has been slow is the cost of the display and
> receiver. Now that receivers will be integrated into most large sets and
> the prices of large sets has dropped out of the stratosphere, look for the
> uptake rate to increase.

I suppose...but it also validates his contention that a UK-like model of
digital SD multicast with low-cost receivers most likely would have been
much more popular than HD has proven to be. USDTV is sort of the right idea,
but not really. At $20/month, it's not really cheaper than basic analog
cable, but with fewer channels, and it's only available in a few areas.
Anonymous
March 7, 2005 10:29:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Matthew Vaughan wrote:
> "Matthew L. Martin" <nothere@notnow.never> wrote in message
> news:112jb9l2qufji61@corp.supernews.com...
>
>><http://broadcastengineering.com/newsletters/rfupdate/20...;
>>
>>Just to counter bob's lies and distortions:
>>
>>At a Feb. 17 hearing, Mark Goldstein, GAO Director, Physical
>>Infrastructure, revealed to the subcommittee findings of a survey it had
>>commissioned to determine how many viewers might require a set-top box and
>>the cost of subsidizing those devices. Among the findings he reported
>>were:
>>
>> * 19 percent, roughly 21 million U.S. households rely exclusively on
>>free over-the-air television
>> * 57 percent, nearly 64 million households view via cable
>> * 19 percent, or about 22 million subscribe to a DBS service
>> * 48 percent of OTA households have incomes under $30,000
>> * 29 percent of cable and DBS households have incomes under $30,000
>> * 6 percent of OTA households have incomes exceeding $100,000
>> * 13 percent of cable and DBS households have incomes exceeding
>>$100,000
>>
>>It doesn't take a genius, though bob still can't figure it out, one of the
>>major reasons HDTV rollout has been slow is the cost of the display and
>>receiver. Now that receivers will be integrated into most large sets and
>>the prices of large sets has dropped out of the stratosphere, look for the
>>uptake rate to increase.
>
>
> I suppose...but it also validates his contention that a UK-like model of
> digital SD multicast with low-cost receivers most likely would have been
> much more popular than HD has proven to be.

So what? Color took a very long time to get where HDTV is now. Almost
all scripted shows on all major networks are available in HDTV. It took
a lot longer for color broadcasts to get that level of dominance.

> USDTV is sort of the right idea,
> but not really. At $20/month, it's not really cheaper than basic analog
> cable, but with fewer channels, and it's only available in a few areas.

Few? Try three. They also appear to be morphing into a dial up ISP.

Matthew

--
Thermodynamics and/or Golf for dummies: There is a game
You can't win
You can't break even
You can't get out of the game
!