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Invalid ip address for router

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September 20, 2012 5:11:13 PM

Hello, I am connected to my wifi router, but the computer will not connect to internet. Diagnosis says "invalid ip addrress". Don't know why this happened overnight. I had been online, went to a public area and ussed internet and when i returned home no internet connection.

More about : invalid address router

September 21, 2012 6:33:03 AM


Hello and welcome to Tom's Hardware Forums.

The quickest way to restore the correct settings is to go into Control Panel, find the connection and delete it completely, then restart the machine and it will reconsititute itself with the right settings. In XP it's Control Panel>Network Connections and in Vista and Windows 7 it's the Network and Sharing Centre.


February 9, 2013 7:40:49 AM

Saga Lout said:

Hello and welcome to Tom's Hardware Forums.

The quickest way to restore the correct settings is to go into Control Panel, find the connection and delete it completely, then restart the machine and it will reconsititute itself with the right settings. In XP it's Control Panel>Network Connections and in Vista and Windows 7 it's the Network and Sharing Centre.


This didn't work for me
February 11, 2013 2:02:47 AM

Maybe I can help, a little bit.

If you have a wireless router, you can perhaps find out if it's working and connected to the Internet by plugging your computer directly into it with an Ethernet cord. Forget WiFi, just see if the router is working by trying a direct wired connection. If the direct connection works, then you can move to diagnosing the *wireless* problem. If the direct connection doesn't work, then you have something else to figure out.

If the direct connection *does* work, and allows you access to the Internet, then you have a problem with your wireless settings. In this case, you will need to leave the Ethernet cable connected, and use your Internet connection to access the router and adjust its wireless settings - or at least discover what those settings are.

In many cases, the URL for accessing the router is simply, routerlogin.net. Type that into your browser's address bar and hit "Enter." It will ask you for a user name and password - the default values are usually printed on a sticker on the router somewhere, or available from the router manufacturer's web site.

Once you have access to the router's "innards," as it were, you can check to see what its security settings are. Very likely, there is a password or something you have to satisfy before Windows will be able to use the wireless functions of your router. If you don't know what that security information is, you won't be able to get Windows to use your router, and you'll be mystified as to why you have this wonderful device and it doesn't work.

The router will have some default security information. You can alter this information, or leave it as is, once you gain access to it. What you have to do is write this information down on a slip of paper - the password and so on - and then tell Windows what it is.

Right-click the Internet icon on the Windows Taskbar, the one that looks like two computer monitors, one behind the other. Then click on, "Connect to a network." Your router should be listed, probably as the only network available. Click on that, and follow the instructions. When prompted, insert the password and other information from your router's default settings.

You may have to restart your computer to get this to work. Windows is funny that way.

And if you have any more problems with this, please post another question here, and I'll see if I can help.
!