Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

OEM vs Full version of Windows

Last response: in Windows Vista
Share
August 23, 2010 4:15:40 AM

Hello

I had read a few articles on OEM vs Full version of Windows OS that say the OEM version is assigned to only one computer or Motherboard and cannot be re-activated on a new computer. I have the OEM version of Windows Vista Premium and have built a completely new computer with new MB / CPU / Ram / power supply. The only hardware not replaced at the time was my graphics card. I installed the OS then activated it over the internet without any problems in a few minutes. Did I just get lucky or is there some misinformation out there? Thanks.
Frank
August 23, 2010 5:14:23 AM

Then your PC didn't have the OEM version... it had to have the retail.
Otherwise there is some real fluke in the 'system'.
m
0
l
August 23, 2010 8:44:12 PM

Well....actually....one thing I've found on a lot of systems....if you check using a tool known as belarc advisor, you will find this is true. A lot of big time manufacturers, instead of installing one system at a time, will use an image, probably very similar to using a tool like Norton Ghost, and basically give the same config to hundreds maybe thousands of different computers. What I've found when working on prebuilts, is that if you use belarc advisor to pull info about installs on a given machine, sometimes on prebuilts the windows key is actually a different key than the one the manufacturer puts on the side of the casing. So really you may have an oem license, but the number on your old case may have never been actually used, hence the reason it activates and works.

I have heard of some shops actually giving people a little money for old computers just for the xp licenses kind of the same thing I talked about before. But that practice could be considered shady....But when you build a pc, expect to buy a new copy of windows.
m
0
l
Related resources
August 23, 2010 8:53:53 PM

wow,
can't say i've ever heard of that before
interesting
m
0
l
August 23, 2010 9:08:06 PM

That is my theory, but I know some client machines I've worked on, when I've gone to pull info in case they have office installed or something like that, i can pull the info in case office needs reinstalled, etc. And sometimes, when you look at the windows key in the registry, it is different than the one on the case itself. My guess is that some of the big name manufacturers get a corporate key that maybe you don't have to activate so they can pass an image to thousands of pc's. But still put a sticker on to show a license, and in case you need a reinstall later.
m
0
l
August 23, 2010 11:01:34 PM

arges86 said:
Then your PC didn't have the OEM version... it had to have the retail.
Otherwise there is some real fluke in the 'system'.


I have the Window Vista Disc right in front of me. It is the OEM version 64 Bit ONLY. Retail is both. The part No. X12-24957 is OEM.

m
0
l
Anonymous
August 23, 2010 11:08:45 PM

There's nothing that stops you from installing an OEM version of Windows on another computer except the Microsoft license which states that OEM software is "tied" to the first computer on which it was installed but may be reinstalled on a new computer in the event of motherboard failure.
m
0
l
August 23, 2010 11:13:31 PM

ohiou_grad_06 said:
Well....actually....one thing I've found on a lot of systems....if you check using a tool known as belarc advisor, you will find this is true. A lot of big time manufacturers, instead of installing one system at a time, will use an image, probably very similar to using a tool like Norton Ghost, and basically give the same config to hundreds maybe thousands of different computers. What I've found when working on prebuilts, is that if you use belarc advisor to pull info about installs on a given machine, sometimes on prebuilts the windows key is actually a different key than the one the manufacturer puts on the side of the casing. So really you may have an oem license, but the number on your old case may have never been actually used, hence the reason it activates and works.

I have heard of some shops actually giving people a little money for old computers just for the xp licenses kind of the same thing I talked about before. But that practice could be considered shady....But when you build a pc, expect to buy a new copy of windows.


I don't think so. I purchased the OS Disk at a local shop with some other parts. It was sealed in the case. I didn't enter a product key when I activated. I clicked on the activation request in the Task Bar a few days after installation after making sure the new computer I built was stable and it verified automatically in a couple of minutes.

Frank
m
0
l
August 24, 2010 1:47:10 AM

Gotcha. However, I do know I've seen this on prebuilts. Probably not as common on homebuilds though.
m
0
l
August 25, 2010 5:59:55 AM

Well I guess I'll just wait until my next upgrade and see what happens then. Only problem is it's going to be a Windows 7 build. Thought maybe I'd try the Ultamate version I like the black box. Well there we are folks the mystery continues. Hey thanks for all the input now I'm more confused than normal.
m
0
l
August 25, 2010 6:54:46 AM

Lol. Keep in mind 7 is essentially vista with a new coat of paint. It will run better, but don't expect it to be vastly different.
m
0
l
!