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Which image/backup software supports RAID 0?

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July 10, 2007 12:30:34 PM

I'm trying to create an image of my computer from an array RAID 0. Does anyone know any software out there that support RAID 0?
Thank you
a b à CPUs
July 10, 2007 1:04:32 PM

Most disc image software will treat RAID 0 no differently than a single drive. I know for a fact Acronis True Image will do it, I used it to mirror my RAID 0 array to a single drive when I had a feeling I was about to lose one of the drives in my RAID 0 array, worked beautifully.
July 11, 2007 5:07:08 AM

The whole idea behind a RAID controller is (usually) to present all the drives as a single image (usually called a Virtual disk) - so the "image" of your system is identical regardess of the raid configuration, RAID 0, 1, 10, 01, 5, 6 all present a single disk to the OS.

~~most~~ image creation software doesn't care about the type of RAID.

Now in a software RAID where a lot of the work (calculating parity data mainly on 5,6 RAID) there is overhead to be sure, but the OS still deals with things as a single disk.

What is important most of the time is that the image you create needs to be restored on a sytem with the same (or at least a similar) RAID controller if it is a hardeware solution, or you need to pre-load drivers if it's a SATA solution.
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July 11, 2007 5:52:24 AM

the_vorlon said:
The whole idea behind a RAID controller is (usually) to present all the drives as a single image (usually called a Virtual disk) - so the "image" of your system is identical regardess of the raid configuration, RAID 0, 1, 10, 01, 5, 6 all present a single disk to the OS.

~~most~~ image creation software doesn't care about the type of RAID.

Now in a software RAID where a lot of the work (calculating parity data mainly on 5,6 RAID) there is overhead to be sure, but the OS still deals with things as a single disk.

What is important most of the time is that the image you create needs to be restored on a sytem with the same (or at least a similar) RAID controller if it is a hardeware solution, or you need to pre-load drivers if it's a SATA solution.


Sort of, but not quite right. Drives in a raid array (normally called a raid array) whether software or hardware raid will be presented to the OS as a single volume. (Or multiple volumes in some complicated raid solutions, but most home users will just see a single volume.)

Most imaging software worthy of the description will see the volume as a single data set. So you make your image, backup set, whatever, and store that off somewhere. So now you don't want raid. Install just a single drive large enough to hold all of the data that was in your raid array, and restore your image or backup set to that drive.

Personally I prefer Acronis, but the same principles apply with Ghost, Veritas, etc. Even Win backup, in a pinch...
March 28, 2009 3:33:08 PM

BUmp, anyone still using software Raid? not exactly a place I want to a software failure
!