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Wide-screen support from older nVidia

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July 17, 2007 7:23:45 PM

I am running a Dell C840 laptop, 2.0 Gig P4 and 1GB memory, Windows 2K, DirectX8.1., docking station,

I got a new 22inch Dell widescreen but my NVidia Ge Force4 440 Go does not appear to support the 1680x1050 resolution that I'm looking for.

Question: Would a video card upgrade solve my problem? If yes, what would be recommended?

Greatly appreciate any advice

a b Î Nvidia
July 17, 2007 8:59:06 PM

make sure you install the drivers to tell the video card it can run @ that res(or at least make sure its set to PNP monitor). 440 Go's had no problems with wide screen 1200X800 was all i tested with but its wide screen either way. Also if you have the newer drivers you can add a custom rez in there


For older drivers - ADD


With the newer Control Panel - Create

I can not stress enough....before a docking startion disconnect reset to a res that the laptops screen can see(its native rez if your big ass screen will take it) then switch back. Some laptops will auto readjust the res, but lets be safe here its a pain, I know hp/compaq's will auto go back to the native res on the laptop and goto 1024x768 on other devices it is not sure about.

Hope this helps.
July 17, 2007 10:33:24 PM

I did install all of the newest drivers from Dell. I checked out your png example of create a new res but I am not given the option. I did notice in you example it was for the 64 MB 440 and I have the 32 MB 440???

The native res of my laptop is better than my monitor, but it seems to only support square and not widescreen. I did hook the monitor straight into the laptop and bypassed the docking station with no luck if thats what you meant.

Thanks for the quick response Nuke

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July 17, 2007 10:39:42 PM

if you do have to get a newer card then an fx5000 series should do.
July 17, 2007 11:16:22 PM

ddwaldon said:
if you do have to get a newer card then an fx5000 series should do.


Ah if only it were that easy. Replacing the GPU in a laptop is NOTHING like replacing a desktop card. They are not widely available (most likely have to go through the manufacturer), so you have to go through the hassle of finding a replacement. Then you have to find out if you even CAN replace the card (most older cards were soldered to the mobo until the MXM came out). Next, you need to find out where the card is, tear apart the laptop, replace the card, and put it back together, all the while praying you didn't F something up. Not so appealing anymore now is it?
But if you can find it and don't mind the hassle, An FX5000 series (as mentioned) should work. Both your card and the FX5 are AGP based.

@mbfoster: I think Nuke meant that while the laptop is docked, reset the res to the native of the laptop screen.
a b Î Nvidia
July 17, 2007 11:17:58 PM

If you can't add your resolution through the control panel & nView, you can add resolution support (up to the RAMDAC/TMDS support of the graphics chipset) by using either PowerStrip (recommended) or a registry hack (not recommended).
a b Î Nvidia
July 17, 2007 11:22:39 PM

lostandwandering said:
Then you have to find out if you even CAN replace the card (most older cards were soldered to the mobo until the MXM came out). Next, you need to find out where the card is, tear apart the laptop, replace the card, and put it back together, all the while praying you didn't F something up. Not so appealing anymore now is it?


Yeah I don't think you have any options with the GFGO4MX series.

Better to just buy a new low end laptop really, they'd likely outperform, and finding a part even if you could upgrade from first gen MXM would be tough as they're extremely rare. but ther'e really no option here, except if it's only for 2D there are PCMCIA and USB solutions that would add support for these resolutions. It might be worth it if all it is is extending or replacing a desktop. But for gaming, forget it, upgrade the whole system.
July 20, 2007 4:49:24 PM

I did finally get the wide screen resolution for this setup. I modified the .inf files so that drivers saw my video card as being on the "acceptable list" of cards. When I say, I did this...my IT guy did it as a last resort and made me promise I wouldn't tell his boss...since we are on a state system.

I agree with everyone, I do need a new video card and for that matter a new computer. Fortuntely, I don't use the computer for gaming, only business applications.

Case Solved
a b Î Nvidia
July 23, 2007 2:08:35 AM

So you did a manual power strip :) 

I see lots of slower computers around that people still use.

Glad you got it working.
!