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Anyone else have fun like this?

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July 26, 2007 10:50:59 PM

Something I like to do is read about the new computers companies are building and then go out and out-build them. For instance, when Toms dropped the article about the new Gateway "gamers" rig, I went and decided how much it would cost to build the exact same thing myself. With the exception that I'd also have the ability to play Blu-Ray movies (because the only internal HD-DVD drive Newegg has also plays Blu Ray discs)(its the LG Super Blu), I built that very same setup for about $500 less, and had a 850 watt 80 PLUs certified powersupply and the memory was 4 gigs of pqi 2x2gig RAM, with a 3 CAS latency (very quick!), and Vista Ultimate, and a Logictech G7 mouse with Microsoft wireless motherboard, and a 24" 5 ms Samsung LCD screen. If I could find a HDDVD internal drive for a PC, then I'd probably of saved another $600 or so, as the LG player is a grand by itself (so it'd cost me $1100 less to build it then buy it). That setup cost about $3920. The Gateway price (for less PC!): $4499.

Anyone else ever do this? I do it everyday: whatever I see a new computer at a retail store or online, I go home and outbuild it. My favorite one so far was this HP: It had a E4400 and a 6800 Ultra graphics card for $949. My build price was $467 less. And I think that I was using more RAM too. But my best setup was against an Alienware: they wanted $10,000 for what I built for around $6000.

Whats the best you have ever outdone a manufacturer (or should we say, assembler) before?

More about : fun

July 26, 2007 10:58:53 PM

If I could, I probably would but like many people on these boards, we have budget limitations. =/
July 27, 2007 12:15:55 AM

i think he is talking about a window-shop type build.
at least i hope so, otherwise: send some of that obviosly highly disposable income this-a-way!
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July 27, 2007 12:17:55 AM

My computer would've cost $2000 i cant remember where i saw it but it was a duplicate of what i own and it only cost $800 to build mine. That was when i learned you can build computers yourself.
July 27, 2007 3:39:54 AM

chaosgs said:
My computer would've cost $2000 i cant remember where i saw it but it was a duplicate of what i own and it only cost $800 to build mine. That was when i learned you can build computers yourself.


Mine cost $1900 and I made the exact same one one Alienware for $4850. Anyone who buys Alienware has to be retarded.
July 27, 2007 4:04:22 AM

Where can you even find a 6800Ultra?
July 27, 2007 6:19:17 AM

scryer_360 said:
Something I like to do is read about the new computers companies are building and then go out and out-build them. For instance, when Toms dropped the article about the new Gateway "gamers" rig, I went and decided how much it would cost to build the exact same thing myself. With the exception that I'd also have the ability to play Blu-Ray movies (because the only internal HD-DVD drive Newegg has also plays Blu Ray discs)(its the LG Super Blu), I built that very same setup for about $500 less, and had a 850 watt 80 PLUs certified powersupply and the memory was 4 gigs of pqi 2x2gig RAM, with a 3 CAS latency (very quick!), and Vista Ultimate, and a Logictech G7 mouse with Microsoft wireless motherboard, and a 24" 5 ms Samsung LCD screen. If I could find a HDDVD internal drive for a PC, then I'd probably of saved another $600 or so, as the LG player is a grand by itself (so it'd cost me $1100 less to build it then buy it). That setup cost about $3920. The Gateway price (for less PC!): $4499.

Anyone else ever do this? I do it everyday: whatever I see a new computer at a retail store or online, I go home and outbuild it. My favorite one so far was this HP: It had a E4400 and a 6800 Ultra graphics card for $949. My build price was $467 less. And I think that I was using more RAM too. But my best setup was against an Alienware: they wanted $10,000 for what I built for around $6000.

Whats the best you have ever outdone a manufacturer (or should we say, assembler) before?



Sounds roughly right. Except for a couple issues that you missed. Shipping costs. Your valuable time to build the rig. Warranty. Support. Peace of mine. And the pre-installed OS and required software


(I suspect you aren't counting the OS and software on your low cost HP computer 'cause you have a retail OS that you just transfer from 'puter to 'puter whereas the prebuilt PC's come equipped with a new version for each build).

Could you do "better" for less $. Sure. Is that the best option of 99% of computer users? No.

By the way, try pricing an entry level computer from Dell, HP or Gateway. Them there $1000 PC's are hard to beat, and the $500 PC's are next to impossible to beat.

Yes, I hear all the horror stories about PSU's and MB's in those cheap computers. Funny thing, the last PSU that needed to be replaced in my small business of 100+ PC's was in 2002. I strongly suspect the advent of XP has improved the durability of PSU's and On-Off switches. The software is not the direct reason. The problem was Win95 and Win98 required many hard shut-offs which was damaging to the PSU'a and switches. And my MB failure is usually within the first 30 days of ownership.


July 27, 2007 7:14:39 AM

When ever you buy a branded PC your paying for their name and warranty, they slip this into the price tag. I know I had a Dell, thats right had.
July 27, 2007 8:09:20 AM

I've pretty much just done this and bought all the bits to build it! My PC with a 24" will come in at 2185, saving me £500 from most system builders and twice to three times that from boutique builders. Not counting the OS as I'll re-use my XP!

Edited: Just tried it on a local builder! Only saved £550 with him!
July 27, 2007 8:34:55 AM

Don't forget the built-in expense of overhead and profit.
July 27, 2007 8:37:33 AM

I wouldn't say I go this far, but I did try to price out what my build would be at Dell.com. Their total cost was over $3000. My total cost came out to around $1700 or less. (I had to shop around a lot and have so rebates). The funny thing is that it is exactly the same hardware (besides the Dell specific case).

I do totally agree that you pay for service and support on any of these, and that on mainstream computers you can't beat the prices (or even come close).

Really most of the building/upgrading is for the enthusiast market, correct? The run-of-the-mill computer market is still best from major manufacturers.

I do find it fun to try to see what it would have cost me and then beat it (though I don't do it literally unless I reall was planning on a new build).
July 27, 2007 10:40:50 AM

Another difference from buying one and building it yourself is you can overclock it when your system gets old to allow it to keep up with newer hardware and applications. dell has theirs locked along with many if not all brands (except dells (i think) xps) (and alienware(i think)). I don't know about yall but I enjoy the extra 10 fps when overclocking.
a b B Homebuilt system
July 27, 2007 12:53:13 PM

If that's what you like to do, then more power to you.
It's always cheaper to build yourself, all here know that, that is why we are here!
As several poster's have mentioned, do not under estimate the value of a prebuilt PC to 99% of the PC using world.

Most everyone here on these forums can relate to problem of being the one person in your family, or circle of friends who gets called upon everytime someone downloads a virus, installs some stupid shareware program that reassociates every picture, movie, or image file on your PC with some worthless image viewer. They may have 27 programs launching at startup, or just general help for some reason. The problems these people can have are almost pitiful and laughable to a lot of us.

A "sort of" comparison would like someone pouring koolaide in the gas tank of their car, and then calling Ford wondering why the car won't run, and the person is like "really....I didn't do anything to it at all, it just won't start". Many of us find we spend a lot of time "helping" others fix their PC problems, which they caused in the first place through their own ignorance.

Now imagine if you put together and sold 100,000 systems a year. Multiply that by 5 or 6 systems you have helped friends, neighbors and family with, and the time you already spend just keeping those people going....now you are starting to see why a PC you can build for $800 costs $1500 or more.
July 27, 2007 1:11:41 PM

I definately understand why they cost so much jitpublisher, you are lucky you only have 5 or 6 people calling on you!
July 27, 2007 2:14:38 PM

I agree that you can build an upper end PC much cheaper, not to mention that many people can reuse some components like optical drives and OSes. However, I don't think you can beat the budget PCs that you'll see sometimes starting at $300-500.
July 27, 2007 4:33:17 PM

wow lol never really thought about that jitpublisher.
July 27, 2007 4:41:29 PM

I just keep a build in Mind, in case a new game {a kick ass game} comes, or my computer goes south, which it doesn't. I'm still hypes about running games at 1920 x 1200 {and all that cool extra stuff) and 60 solid fps so once 24" {$700} drops to the price of a 22" {350}. I might just settle with PC-gaming on my 56" DLP.

in response to jitpublisher,
Yeah that's why I've learned not to 'Build PC' for friends {hardware's fine, just gets FUBAR by downloading crap on p2p that they have no frigging clue about.}, they pay you $800 to build it, you do the work for free, and then you have to support them {with diapers} it ends up costing you $1500 in time.

Tech support for Idiots is always going to be around, and Sales Staff that don't know Shinola are always going to make more money that IT, it pays to be dumb.
July 27, 2007 5:21:19 PM

I never questioned the low end PC market, I'm freaking amazed at what I see out of that all the time. Like once I was opening up a Dell for a friend that he said he got for $500. I knew it had an AMD Sempron, and it came with 512 mb of RAM, and a "good graphics card" to use his words. I open it up, and the processor is right, the RAM is right, but the statement about the graphics card was underdone. It had a 6600 GT, and this was when that card was new! He said he spent like $600 on it. This was way back in late 2004. It was the lowest end processor he could get from the Sempron line I think, and I know it only had a standard CD/DVD player (or hell, that could've just been CD), but for $600? I knew then I could build it cheaper, but I'd probably save less than $100, if even half that.

But for anything midrange or upmarket, its pretty easy to beat the price. And here is the thing, I think anyone who can afford the price of an Alienware or XPS probably is smart enough to build their own, at least 90% of the time. Thats because 90% of the people had to be smart enough to actually get the job or business that can afford those machines.

But it does strike me odd sometimes the things that people simply cannot do for themselves, Im opening another thread about that.
July 27, 2007 5:21:55 PM

fferree said:
Don't forget the built-in expense of overhead and profit.


The companies that sell computer parts also have the built-in expense of overhead and profit. You can't really consider that in the equation. Instead of paying all of it at once to Dell, you divvy it up between newegg, zipzoom, frys, etc...

-TyShoe
July 28, 2007 12:45:51 AM

Heyyou27 said:
Where can you even find a 6800Ultra?

u can have my old one if u want... (5-10 quid?)
July 28, 2007 8:21:16 AM

come on, $300 (CAD) emachines are great stocking stuffers {for old people}
!