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Best LCD for guy with one eye?

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  • LCD
  • Monitors
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Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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July 31, 2007 6:32:18 PM

I'm a programmer, and I've just started at a new job where I'm looking at a screen 10+ hours a day. I have one eye, so eye strain is a big problem for me.

I'm wondering what the best monitors are for reducing eye strain? What specs should I be looking for?

More about : lcd guy eye

a b U Graphics card
July 31, 2007 6:44:15 PM

Good question, I cant give recomendations, but will be waiting for some good answers tho. A pleasent monitor is always a plus
a b U Graphics card
July 31, 2007 6:48:02 PM

MichaudP said:
I'm a programmer, and I've just started at a new job where I'm looking at a screen 10+ hours a day. I have one eye, so eye strain is a big problem for me.

I'm wondering what the best monitors are for reducing eye strain? What specs should I be looking for?


No specific monitor, but good suggestions for reducing eye strain.

http://www.nfib.com/object/IO_16099.html
Related resources
a b U Graphics card
a b C Monitor
July 31, 2007 7:26:14 PM

I'm a programmer too. I have yet to find a monitor, crt or lcd, that won't strain your eyes after 8-10 hours. What seems to work for me is every 20 minutes or so look at a distant object for a few minutes. Don't focus on it, but just keep it within your vision.
July 31, 2007 7:27:04 PM

Well, thanks for the suggestion -- as a person who has dealt with this most of my life, I very much follow all those suggestions and more. What I really need to find is a monitor that I can crank up to at least 75hz.

That's a side note: how does the refresh rate display setting affect LCD monitors?
July 31, 2007 7:41:18 PM

the refresh rate on a modern lcd won't really have an effect on eyestrain. its not like a crt monitor where 60hz is unbearible (for me at least) and 100hz looks smooth(to me once again..). the backlight is always on so it shouldn't matter. just take hawkeye22's advice and focus on a distant object every so often.
a c 143 U Graphics card
a b C Monitor
July 31, 2007 8:01:53 PM

I switched from an 85 Hz CRT to a 60 Hz LCD and I actually find it better, no more eye strain. Both were Viewsonic, not that it really matters.

I guess an LCD with a higher than 60 refresh rate would be nicer, but it's really not very important.
July 31, 2007 8:33:15 PM

Well guys, the proof is in the pudding for me -- when I have a run-of-the-mill LCD monitor set at 60hz, it kills my eye. I can barely see by the end of the day. On the other hand, I have a ViewSonic VX924 at home, which advertises a 4ms response time and can be set to 75hz -- it's been fine. I still have strain after a long day's work, but it's very tolerable compared to what I'm looking at now which is a Wide screen dell that I'm guessing has 12ms rt and 60hz rr.

I bough the VX924 quite a while ago now, and I'm not sure my company will be able to get one from their suppliers... the newer one (VX922) costs like $600 and I'm not really comfortable asking them to buy it for me.
July 31, 2007 8:35:50 PM

aevm said:
I switched from an 85 Hz CRT to a 60 Hz LCD and I actually find it better, no more eye strain. Both were Viewsonic, not that it really matters.

I guess an LCD with a higher than 60 refresh rate would be nicer, but it's really not very important.


I don't think LCD's are affected by refresh rate since each pixel is independently controlled and the whole screen is not continuously redrawn like with a CRT.
a c 143 U Graphics card
a b C Monitor
July 31, 2007 9:06:50 PM

Actually, I agree with SEALBoy, the refresh rate shouldn't matter. I wonder, maybe your eye strain is less on the VX924 because of some other factors? Does the VX924 have bigger pixels for example, or is it a little darker? Are you using the same font size? Are you taking more frequent or longer breaks at home than at work? Is the light in the room different at work than at home? Maybe the video cards are different at work and at home and that make some difference? Maybe some setting from the nVidia control panel or equivalent?

Sorry if I ask silly questions, it's not my area...
July 31, 2007 9:09:25 PM

I suffered from headaches fairly frequently from looking at my monitors all day. I'm lucky enough to have a boss that let me take all the bulbs out of the fluorescent light over my desk. After that, I could drop the brightness of my monitors to around 1/2 to 3/4 of what they were to begin with. That made a world of difference for me, but I'm sure that's not a option for everyone.
July 31, 2007 9:22:42 PM

Have you tried lowering the contrast and the brightness on your screen. I found that it helps quit a bit to be looking at a softer image.
July 31, 2007 10:30:56 PM

SEALBoy said:
I don't think LCD's are affected by refresh rate since each pixel is independently controlled and the whole screen is not continuously redrawn like with a CRT.


Yep, on an LCD a pixel is only updated when its colour is changed, so refresh rate is irrelevant.

The response rate is the thing to look for as that tells you how long the pixel takes to change colour when instructed to do so.
a b U Graphics card
a b C Monitor
July 31, 2007 11:24:57 PM

MichaudP said:
Well guys, the proof is in the pudding for me -- when I have a run-of-the-mill LCD monitor set at 60hz, it kills my eye. I can barely see by the end of the day. On the other hand, I have a ViewSonic VX924 at home, which advertises a 4ms response time and can be set to 75hz -- it's been fine. I still have strain after a long day's work, but it's very tolerable compared to what I'm looking at now which is a Wide screen dell that I'm guessing has 12ms rt and 60hz rr.


You know I have the same problem. I work on 21" CRT all day and I'm fine never a problem (both @ 2 ft and 4ft from the screen ie leaning forward / leaning back), but when I either work at another location or at home on a standard LCD, after about an hour I sometimes have to close one eye (my weaker one I know from Bow hunting), just to feel comfortable and even then sometimes I just need to walk away and come back. The thing I find helps the most is higher contrast (without washout). It wouldn't surprise me if the biggest difference between the two isn't the refresh rate but the contrast levels between your two monitors.

Anywhoo, just my two frames' worth as always.
a b U Graphics card
July 31, 2007 11:46:57 PM

My eyes seem to alway strain out at the 17" NEC CRT I am using today a twork. I set it at 12 x 10 with 85hz refresh rate. My eyes begin to strain before long. At home using a 22" BenQ LCD 5mz response at 16x1050 sitting at eye level and probably arm's length away, I have no problem at all with eye strain. If I can set back a ways from the small 17" CRT, I think it helps relieve the strain. Maybe the OP can ask for a new LCD at work, the price on 19" widescreens has come way down recently...like $159-$179. When I hit the lotttery, I'm thinking about a major upgrade with this 28".

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

a c 302 U Graphics card
a c 83 C Monitor
July 31, 2007 11:55:33 PM

Look for a monitor with 16.7 m colors, not 16.2. The difference does not sound like much, but the 16.2 monitors use dithering to simulate true colors. All this was a revelation to me. Research "dithering" on google to learn more. You also might look at monitors with 178 H/V vision angles. Less capable monitors are at 160 or so.
August 1, 2007 1:06:21 AM

geofelt said:
Look for a monitor with 16.7 m colors, not 16.2. The difference does not sound like much, but the 16.2 monitors use dithering to simulate true colors. All this was a revelation to me. Research "dithering" on google to learn more. You also might look at monitors with 178 H/V vision angles. Less capable monitors are at 160 or so.



Those are good things to look for, don't get me wrong... but how do either of those things factor into the OPs inquiry? I'm sure they wouldn't change the effectiveness of one monitor over another for a person with only one eye.

-TyShoe
August 1, 2007 1:29:02 AM

Things to look for: High refresh rate (75hz) and a low response time (<=5ms). I'm not sure if the response time has an effect on eye strain, but it is a good thing to have.
August 1, 2007 1:37:11 AM

a 4:3 19" monitor, my eyes work individually for me (don't ask, birth defect), and i find that 4:3 monitors are much easier on my eyes, i recommended a 19" because anything above that gets really expensive.
August 1, 2007 2:12:18 AM

Don't work under flourescent lights, they always put strain on your eyes. Also don't go for a widescreen since they usually require that you move your eyes to view the whole screen.
August 1, 2007 3:53:55 AM

MichaudP said:
I'm a programmer, and I've just started at a new job where I'm looking at a screen 10+ hours a day. I have one eye, so eye strain is a big problem for me.

I'm wondering what the best monitors are for reducing eye strain? What specs should I be looking for?



get a bigger monitor (not necessarily more pixels) and sit farther away?
a c 302 U Graphics card
a c 83 C Monitor
August 1, 2007 4:07:32 AM

A good quality monitor is easier on the eyes, regardless if you have one, or two --I think--. It makes sense to me to think that If you have an eye limitation, that it would be good to get the best possible monitor. Last year, I was using two IBM P275 21" monitors at 85hz. At the time, it was the best you could get. I decided to get a lcd to clear some desk space. I bought a Samsung 244T 24" monitor and replaced one of the IBM's. It was wonderful. The problem was that the IBM crt monitor sitting side by side looked just awful by comparison. I then bought a smaller and cheaper Samsung 19" lcd to replace the second crt. It worked , but the image quality difference was very noticeable sitting side by side. I had to return it and spend more than I wanted to get a second Samsung 244T. The message is that there IS a difference in a good lcd monitor.
Regarding refresh rates, all Samsung lcd monitors refresh at 60hz. Since the image is not regenerated, it does not need what a crt does.
The good lcd monitors have a wide range of adjustments, both via the on-screen-display, and via driver software. With a good quality lcd, you can probably do a better job of tuning it to suit your needs. This is a case where you probably get what you pay for. A good monitor is one of the few computer parts that is future-proof and will not be obsolete in a year or two. Get the best you can afford.
!