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Anyway to speed up boot when not connected to LAN?

Last response: in Networking
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May 8, 2001 3:42:57 AM

I noticed that, when my computer isn't hooked up to my school's LAN, it takes longer to boot. I think this is because of the NIC taking time to find a connection. Is there anyway to tell the NIC to not look for a connection? Any help would be appreciated.

Email me if need be.
Anonymous
May 8, 2001 4:13:15 AM

Is it's TCP/IP protocol set to get an IP automatically?

***check the jumpers 1st then check em again***
May 8, 2001 4:46:33 AM

I don't know if this applies to you, but I've seen the CMOS boot sequence been configured to boot from LAN first. If this is so, change it to 'C only' or 'A,C' depending on your preference. I prefer 'C only' as it doesn't waste time looking for a floppy disk. If something goes wrong, you can always change it back. This will probably cut some boot time.

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May 8, 2001 5:04:16 AM

Yes, it is. Could I just define an IP and then it wouldn't go looking for one?

Thanks.
Anonymous
May 8, 2001 6:49:33 AM

Quote:
Yes, it is. Could I just define an IP and then it wouldn't go looking for one?

Exactly. Windows has a timeout of about 60sec when the DHCP drivers are loaded. If no DHCP server responds, you are just sitting there waiting. By setting the IP to a static number (if you are not connected, it does not matter what it is), then this timeout period is avoided. This could be more hassle than its worth, as you would be constantly changing the network settings.

If the NIC is a PCMCIA card, see what happens if you boot without the card. I don't have much experience with these, but it might cleanly boot if the NIC is not present.

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I have not yet begun to procrastinate.
May 8, 2001 6:37:49 PM

Well, it's going to be disconnected the whole summer. I only use the NIC when I'm at school. Would defining a static IP interfere with my modem when I try to connect using it? What IP would you suggest I use? Just 0.0.0.0 or something?

Thanks for all your help.
May 8, 2001 9:49:24 PM

You can put :

Ip : 169.254.134.1
Subnet : 255.255.255.0

It's better to be rich and healthy than poor and sick!
May 8, 2001 10:04:09 PM

Why those in particular? Would it hurt anything to just put in zeroes?
Anonymous
May 9, 2001 12:03:35 AM

There are some ip address reserved for private use. Anyone can freely use an IP from one of these ranges:
10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255
172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255
192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255

However, if you are not connected to the internet, it does not matter what is there. 0.0.0.0 will work fine, and not interfere with your modem.



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I have not yet begun to procrastinate.
May 9, 2001 1:25:23 AM

How about making a "no-net" hardware profile? With 9x, NT, 2000, etc., you can choose right from boot whether you want the NIC to be enabled or disabled.

"Let's take the warning labels off everything and let natural selection clean the gene pool!"
May 9, 2001 1:30:24 AM

Uhhh, how do you do that?

If it's a really indepth procedure, save your breath...I'll just be content with setting a static IP.
May 11, 2001 11:41:23 PM

It's not that bad. If you want to find out, let me know what OS you have.

"Let's take the warning labels off everything and let natural selection clean the gene pool!"
!