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8000HD hook-up question.

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Anonymous
March 19, 2005 1:12:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I recently got an 8000HD DVR from Adelphia to hook to my Sony KV-36FS16 set.
I'd always just used the 75 ohm coax with an older cable box and so hooked
up the new one the same way, using the component-video connection for my
DVD.

I was told by Adelphia that if I hooked the TV to the box using the
component-video I would get a much better picture, especially when viewing
HD content, and that I could hook the DVD to the S-Video with little loss in
quality. They even went so far as to suggest I would actually get a HD
display, but that sounded far-fetched to me.

I'd just fool around with various hook-ups to see how it looks, but I'm on
crutches and moving the rug and pulling the set out for hook-up and then
going around to check results is a lot of effort so I was hoping someone
might offer their experience in this to tell me if the changes are
worth-while insofar as picture quality is concerned.

--
dvus

More about : 8000hd hook question

Anonymous
March 19, 2005 6:47:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I think you have to hook up the DVR to your TV set using component cables,
or HDMI if you have that, in order to get HD on your TV set. If you only
have one component input into your TV set, then you will have to hook up
your DVD player some other way. The S-video seems like a reasonable
alternative.

mack
austin


"dvus" <dven1@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:wfadnQhL7LHG3KHfRVn-oA@adelphia.com...
>I recently got an 8000HD DVR from Adelphia to hook to my Sony KV-36FS16
>set. I'd always just used the 75 ohm coax with an older cable box and so
>hooked up the new one the same way, using the component-video connection
>for my DVD.
>
> I was told by Adelphia that if I hooked the TV to the box using the
> component-video I would get a much better picture, especially when viewing
> HD content, and that I could hook the DVD to the S-Video with little loss
> in quality. They even went so far as to suggest I would actually get a HD
> display, but that sounded far-fetched to me.
>
> I'd just fool around with various hook-ups to see how it looks, but I'm on
> crutches and moving the rug and pulling the set out for hook-up and then
> going around to check results is a lot of effort so I was hoping someone
> might offer their experience in this to tell me if the changes are
> worth-while insofar as picture quality is concerned.
>
> --
> dvus
>
March 20, 2005 10:50:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hi,
Prepare for your 8000 HD to crash. I had two; one lasted one day and the
next one lasted 3 weeks. Sudden hard drive crash because of overheating; no
fan in it. I now have had an 8300HD for 2 weeks, and so far all OK. Don't
save great programs for too long; watch them as fast as you can or you might
lose them.
With the 8000, you have to use component out into your digital input of the
TV to watch HD and to get the best viewing. Surely your TV has more than one
component input. Watch DVD with another component input. If your DVD has
progressive scan output, then you'll have to use component output to use
that feature; with S-Video you won't be able to use the progressive scan
feature as far as I know. The new 8300HD has an HDMI out but my TV does not
have that kind of input. That's fine, I'm satisfied with the picture right
now.
Roger
Related resources
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 10:51:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Roger wrote:

> Hi,
> Prepare for your 8000 HD to crash. I had two; one lasted one day and
> the next one lasted 3 weeks. Sudden hard drive crash because of
> overheating; no fan in it. I now have had an 8300HD for 2 weeks, and
> so far all OK. Don't save great programs for too long; watch them as
> fast as you can or you might lose them.

I've had it since last December or so and no crashes so far. I do get
"grey-outs" once in a while that last a few seconds, and I lose audio on the
lower channels that forces me to switch to a digital channel and back to
fix.

> With the 8000, you have to use component out into your digital input
> of the TV to watch HD and to get the best viewing. Surely your TV has
> more than one component input. Watch DVD with another component

No, #1 is composite/S-Video, #2 is composite only, #3 is component. In
addition there's a front composite and 75ohm inputs and outputs.

> input. If your DVD has progressive scan output, then you'll have to
> use component output to use that feature; with S-Video you won't be
> able to use the progressive scan feature as far as I know. The new
> 8300HD has an HDMI out but my TV does not have that kind of input.
> That's fine, I'm satisfied with the picture right now.

I have a progressive scan DVD player on the component inputs but I've yet to
see a DVD that uses it. Every one I've tried gives a scrambled picture when
I turn "Progressive Scan" on.

--
dvus
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 3:55:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

dvus wrote:
> Roger wrote:
>
>
>>Hi,
>>Prepare for your 8000 HD to crash. I had two; one lasted one day and
>>the next one lasted 3 weeks. Sudden hard drive crash because of
>>overheating; no fan in it. I now have had an 8300HD for 2 weeks, and
>>so far all OK. Don't save great programs for too long; watch them as
>>fast as you can or you might lose them.
>
>
> I've had it since last December or so and no crashes so far. I do get
> "grey-outs" once in a while that last a few seconds, and I lose audio on the
> lower channels that forces me to switch to a digital channel and back to
> fix.
>
>
>>With the 8000, you have to use component out into your digital input
>>of the TV to watch HD and to get the best viewing. Surely your TV has
>>more than one component input. Watch DVD with another component
>
>
> No, #1 is composite/S-Video, #2 is composite only, #3 is component. In
> addition there's a front composite and 75ohm inputs and outputs.

I checked the Sony website for the manual for your model TV. Unless I
am missing something, your TV is NOT an HD capable TV, correct? The
manual spec page does not say much about the component port, but I would
assume it can only handle 480i or 480p input. If you do not have a HD
set, you might be better off with the standard SA8000, not the HD model.

If your set is not an HD TV, you should probably leave the DVD player
hooked up to component, but use the S-Video from the Set Top Box. The
S-Video should give you a better picture than the RF cable. However, if
you use the speakers in the TV for sound, you will need to run the
stereo cables to the TV to carry the audio signal (or use digital audio
if you are set up for 5.1 sound and are willing to look at the HD
channels in SD mode).

Alan F
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 4:24:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sat, 19 Mar 2005 10:12:34 -0500, "dvus" <dven1@adelphia.net> wrote:

>I recently got an 8000HD DVR from Adelphia to hook to my Sony KV-36FS16 set.
>I'd always just used the 75 ohm coax with an older cable box and so hooked
>up the new one the same way, using the component-video connection for my
>DVD.
>
>I was told by Adelphia that if I hooked the TV to the box using the
>component-video I would get a much better picture, especially when viewing
>HD content, and that I could hook the DVD to the S-Video with little loss in
>quality. They even went so far as to suggest I would actually get a HD
>display, but that sounded far-fetched to me.
>
>I'd just fool around with various hook-ups to see how it looks, but I'm on
>crutches and moving the rug and pulling the set out for hook-up and then
>going around to check results is a lot of effort so I was hoping someone
>might offer their experience in this to tell me if the changes are
>worth-while insofar as picture quality is concerned.
>
I found the TV manual at the Sony site:

http://www.docs.sony.com/release/KV32FV16.PDF

Apparently this is a 16x9 standard def set with one component input.
It doesn't appear to be a HDTV or EDTV. That seems to be confirmed by
the fact that the component in doesn't support a progressive scan
input from your DVD player.

This means to me that you probably won't see much difference in
picture quality between the component and S-Vid inputs, but only you
can tell that by trying the source components in each. So, I suggest
you try the DVR with the component and S-Vid in as well as the DVD
player in each. Set it up with the source that looks best with the
component in. If both are better with component, then consider
getting a component switch box or an A/V receiver with component
switching. Personally, I wouldn't bother to invest in a switch box
for a TV like yours, but that's my own opinion.

I should note that the DVR component out may not be adjustable to
provide a 480i signal. If it can't be set to that in the menu, then
it won't work with the TV's component in anyway and your decision will
be made for you - use the S-Vid out from the DVR.

Finally, what you will see from a HD box won't be true HD, but a
picture that's down converted to 480i. At least your set has a 16x9
aspect ratio, so most HD programming won't be letterboxed.

Gary E
--
|Gary A. Edelstein
|edelsgNO@SPAMyahoo.com.invalid (remove NO SPAM and .invalid to reply)
|"We have met the enemy and he is us." - Walt Kelly's Pogo
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 10:13:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Alan Figgatt wrote:
> dvus wrote:
>> Roger wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Hi,
>>> Prepare for your 8000 HD to crash. I had two; one lasted one day and
>>> the next one lasted 3 weeks. Sudden hard drive crash because of
>>> overheating; no fan in it. I now have had an 8300HD for 2 weeks, and
>>> so far all OK. Don't save great programs for too long; watch them as
>>> fast as you can or you might lose them.
>>
>>
>> I've had it since last December or so and no crashes so far. I do get
>> "grey-outs" once in a while that last a few seconds, and I lose
>> audio on the lower channels that forces me to switch to a digital
>> channel and back to fix.
>>
>>
>>> With the 8000, you have to use component out into your digital input
>>> of the TV to watch HD and to get the best viewing. Surely your TV
>>> has more than one component input. Watch DVD with another component
>>
>>
>> No, #1 is composite/S-Video, #2 is composite only, #3 is component.
>> In addition there's a front composite and 75ohm inputs and outputs.
>
> I checked the Sony website for the manual for your model TV. Unless I
> am missing something, your TV is NOT an HD capable TV, correct? The
> manual spec page does not say much about the component port, but I
> would assume it can only handle 480i or 480p input. If you do not
> have a HD set, you might be better off with the standard SA8000, not
> the HD model.

The place that sold it to me said it was "HD ready", whatever that means.
Unfortunately, I see nothing in the manual that says that, or even what
resolution the damn thing is capable of displaying.

> If your set is not an HD TV, you should probably leave the DVD player
> hooked up to component, but use the S-Video from the Set Top Box. The
> S-Video should give you a better picture than the RF cable. However,
> if you use the speakers in the TV for sound, you will need to run the
> stereo cables to the TV to carry the audio signal (or use digital
> audio if you are set up for 5.1 sound and are willing to look at the
> HD channels in SD mode).

<sigh...>, if I ever figure out what 480i and 480p are I'll be able to talk
more intelligently. At this point, most of what I read in here is,
unfortunately, over my head. Why can't there just be HiDef and LoDef or
something? Every time I try to learn a little about this there's a bunch of
new terms I've never heard of. It's no wonder the salespeople are so able to
pull the wool over a person's eyes.

--
dvus
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 10:15:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Gary A. Edelstein wrote:
> On Sat, 19 Mar 2005 10:12:34 -0500, "dvus" <dven1@adelphia.net> wrote:
>
>> I recently got an 8000HD DVR from Adelphia to hook to my Sony
>> KV-36FS16 set. I'd always just used the 75 ohm coax with an older
>> cable box and so hooked up the new one the same way, using the
>> component-video connection for my DVD.
>>
>> I was told by Adelphia that if I hooked the TV to the box using the
>> component-video I would get a much better picture, especially when
>> viewing HD content, and that I could hook the DVD to the S-Video
>> with little loss in quality. They even went so far as to suggest I
>> would actually get a HD display, but that sounded far-fetched to me.
>>
>> I'd just fool around with various hook-ups to see how it looks, but
>> I'm on crutches and moving the rug and pulling the set out for
>> hook-up and then going around to check results is a lot of effort so
>> I was hoping someone might offer their experience in this to tell me
>> if the changes are worth-while insofar as picture quality is
>> concerned.
>>
> I found the TV manual at the Sony site:
>
> http://www.docs.sony.com/release/KV32FV16.PDF
>
> Apparently this is a 16x9 standard def set with one component input.
> It doesn't appear to be a HDTV or EDTV. That seems to be confirmed by
> the fact that the component in doesn't support a progressive scan
> input from your DVD player.
>
> This means to me that you probably won't see much difference in
> picture quality between the component and S-Vid inputs, but only you
> can tell that by trying the source components in each. So, I suggest
> you try the DVR with the component and S-Vid in as well as the DVD
> player in each. Set it up with the source that looks best with the
> component in. If both are better with component, then consider
> getting a component switch box or an A/V receiver with component
> switching. Personally, I wouldn't bother to invest in a switch box
> for a TV like yours, but that's my own opinion.
>
> I should note that the DVR component out may not be adjustable to
> provide a 480i signal. If it can't be set to that in the menu, then
> it won't work with the TV's component in anyway and your decision will
> be made for you - use the S-Vid out from the DVR.
>
> Finally, what you will see from a HD box won't be true HD, but a
> picture that's down converted to 480i. At least your set has a 16x9
> aspect ratio, so most HD programming won't be letterboxed.

Thank you for the info. I will hook up the DVR to the S-Video and leave it
at that.

--
dvus
Anonymous
March 22, 2005 12:39:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"dvus" <dven1@adelphia.net> wrote:

>Alan Figgatt wrote:
>> dvus wrote:
>>> Roger wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> Hi,
>>>> Prepare for your 8000 HD to crash. I had two; one lasted one day and
>>>> the next one lasted 3 weeks. Sudden hard drive crash because of
>>>> overheating; no fan in it. I now have had an 8300HD for 2 weeks, and
>>>> so far all OK. Don't save great programs for too long; watch them as
>>>> fast as you can or you might lose them.
>>>
>>>
>>> I've had it since last December or so and no crashes so far. I do get
>>> "grey-outs" once in a while that last a few seconds, and I lose
>>> audio on the lower channels that forces me to switch to a digital
>>> channel and back to fix.
>>>
>>>
>>>> With the 8000, you have to use component out into your digital input
>>>> of the TV to watch HD and to get the best viewing. Surely your TV
>>>> has more than one component input. Watch DVD with another component
>>>
>>>
>>> No, #1 is composite/S-Video, #2 is composite only, #3 is component.
>>> In addition there's a front composite and 75ohm inputs and outputs.
>>
>> I checked the Sony website for the manual for your model TV. Unless I
>> am missing something, your TV is NOT an HD capable TV, correct? The
>> manual spec page does not say much about the component port, but I
>> would assume it can only handle 480i or 480p input. If you do not
>> have a HD set, you might be better off with the standard SA8000, not
>> the HD model.
>
>The place that sold it to me said it was "HD ready", whatever that means.
>Unfortunately, I see nothing in the manual that says that, or even what
>resolution the damn thing is capable of displaying.
>
>> If your set is not an HD TV, you should probably leave the DVD player
>> hooked up to component, but use the S-Video from the Set Top Box. The
>> S-Video should give you a better picture than the RF cable. However,
>> if you use the speakers in the TV for sound, you will need to run the
>> stereo cables to the TV to carry the audio signal (or use digital
>> audio if you are set up for 5.1 sound and are willing to look at the
>> HD channels in SD mode).
>
><sigh...>, if I ever figure out what 480i and 480p are I'll be able to talk
>more intelligently. At this point, most of what I read in here is,
>unfortunately, over my head. Why can't there just be HiDef and LoDef or
>something? Every time I try to learn a little about this there's a bunch of
>new terms I've never heard of. It's no wonder the salespeople are so able to
>pull the wool over a person's eyes.

A quick resolution summary (though be warned I'm far from an expert):
All SD (standard definition) TV is 480i (480 lines, interlaced). HD
(high definition) TV can be any of a variety of resolutions, the most
common being: 480p (480 lines, progressive), 720p, and 1080i.

If your TV set is a SD set, as it seems likely, there would be no need
for the manual to talk about resolution at all, since all SD
resolution is 480i.

-barry
Anonymous
March 22, 2005 8:58:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Barry F Margolius wrote:
> "dvus" <dven1@adelphia.net> wrote:
>
>
>>Alan Figgatt wrote:
>>
>>>dvus wrote:
>>>
>>>>Roger wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Hi,
>>>>>Prepare for your 8000 HD to crash. I had two; one lasted one day and
>>>>>the next one lasted 3 weeks. Sudden hard drive crash because of
>>>>>overheating; no fan in it. I now have had an 8300HD for 2 weeks, and
>>>>>so far all OK. Don't save great programs for too long; watch them as
>>>>>fast as you can or you might lose them.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>I've had it since last December or so and no crashes so far. I do get
>>>>"grey-outs" once in a while that last a few seconds, and I lose
>>>>audio on the lower channels that forces me to switch to a digital
>>>>channel and back to fix.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>With the 8000, you have to use component out into your digital input
>>>>>of the TV to watch HD and to get the best viewing. Surely your TV
>>>>>has more than one component input. Watch DVD with another component
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>No, #1 is composite/S-Video, #2 is composite only, #3 is component.
>>>>In addition there's a front composite and 75ohm inputs and outputs.
>>>
>>> I checked the Sony website for the manual for your model TV. Unless I
>>>am missing something, your TV is NOT an HD capable TV, correct? The
>>>manual spec page does not say much about the component port, but I
>>>would assume it can only handle 480i or 480p input. If you do not
>>>have a HD set, you might be better off with the standard SA8000, not
>>>the HD model.
>>
>>The place that sold it to me said it was "HD ready", whatever that means.
>>Unfortunately, I see nothing in the manual that says that, or even what
>>resolution the damn thing is capable of displaying.
>>
>>
>>> If your set is not an HD TV, you should probably leave the DVD player
>>>hooked up to component, but use the S-Video from the Set Top Box. The
>>>S-Video should give you a better picture than the RF cable. However,
>>>if you use the speakers in the TV for sound, you will need to run the
>>>stereo cables to the TV to carry the audio signal (or use digital
>>>audio if you are set up for 5.1 sound and are willing to look at the
>>>HD channels in SD mode).
>>
>><sigh...>, if I ever figure out what 480i and 480p are I'll be able to talk
>>more intelligently. At this point, most of what I read in here is,
>>unfortunately, over my head. Why can't there just be HiDef and LoDef or
>>something? Every time I try to learn a little about this there's a bunch of
>>new terms I've never heard of. It's no wonder the salespeople are so able to
>>pull the wool over a person's eyes.
>
>
> A quick resolution summary (though be warned I'm far from an expert):
> All SD (standard definition) TV is 480i (480 lines, interlaced). HD
> (high definition) TV can be any of a variety of resolutions, the most
> common being: 480p (480 lines, progressive), 720p, and 1080i.
>
> If your TV set is a SD set, as it seems likely, there would be no need
> for the manual to talk about resolution at all, since all SD
> resolution is 480i.
>
> -barry
I really kind of have to take issue with 480p being "high definition"
TV. it's definately part of the DTV spec (Digital TV), but it's really a
misnomer to call it high-def. I've seen it referred to as IDTV (Improved
Definition) which is really all it is. Probably nobody would argue that
720p and 1080i are truly high-definition, but 480p is nothing more than
IDTV. That's not to say it's not much better than 480i in most
circumstances, but let's call it what it actually is :) 
Anonymous
March 22, 2005 10:37:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Barry F Margolius wrote:
> "dvus" <dven1@adelphia.net> wrote:
>> Alan Figgatt wrote:
>>> dvus wrote:
>>>> Roger wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Prepare for your 8000 HD to crash. I had two; one lasted one day
>>>>> and the next one lasted 3 weeks. Sudden hard drive crash because
>>>>> of overheating; no fan in it. I now have had an 8300HD for 2
>>>>> weeks, and so far all OK. Don't save great programs for too long;
>>>>> watch them as fast as you can or you might lose them.
>>>>
>>>> I've had it since last December or so and no crashes so far. I do
>>>> get "grey-outs" once in a while that last a few seconds, and I lose
>>>> audio on the lower channels that forces me to switch to a digital
>>>> channel and back to fix.
>>>>
>>>>> With the 8000, you have to use component out into your digital
>>>>> input of the TV to watch HD and to get the best viewing. Surely
>>>>> your TV has more than one component input. Watch DVD with another
>>>>> component
>>>>
>>>> No, #1 is composite/S-Video, #2 is composite only, #3 is component.
>>>> In addition there's a front composite and 75ohm inputs and outputs.
>>>
>>> I checked the Sony website for the manual for your model TV.
>>> Unless I am missing something, your TV is NOT an HD capable TV,
>>> correct? The manual spec page does not say much about the component
>>> port, but I would assume it can only handle 480i or 480p input. If
>>> you do not have a HD set, you might be better off with the standard
>>> SA8000, not the HD model.
>>
>> The place that sold it to me said it was "HD ready", whatever that
>> means. Unfortunately, I see nothing in the manual that says that, or
>> even what resolution the damn thing is capable of displaying.
>>
>>> If your set is not an HD TV, you should probably leave the DVD
>>> player hooked up to component, but use the S-Video from the Set Top
>>> Box. The S-Video should give you a better picture than the RF
>>> cable. However, if you use the speakers in the TV for sound, you
>>> will need to run the stereo cables to the TV to carry the audio
>>> signal (or use digital audio if you are set up for 5.1 sound and
>>> are willing to look at the HD channels in SD mode).
>>
>> <sigh...>, if I ever figure out what 480i and 480p are I'll be able
>> to talk more intelligently. At this point, most of what I read in
>> here is, unfortunately, over my head. Why can't there just be HiDef
>> and LoDef or something? Every time I try to learn a little about
>> this there's a bunch of new terms I've never heard of. It's no
>> wonder the salespeople are so able to pull the wool over a person's
>> eyes.
>
> A quick resolution summary (though be warned I'm far from an expert):
> All SD (standard definition) TV is 480i (480 lines, interlaced). HD
> (high definition) TV can be any of a variety of resolutions, the most
> common being: 480p (480 lines, progressive), 720p, and 1080i.

Ok, if I remember right, (i)nterlaced deals with a system that produces odd
scan lines on one scan and then the even on the next, and so on.
(P)rogressive I'm not sure about, but the term seems to suggest needing more
than one scan to get a full picture. Assuming I'm correct, why is one better
than the other?

> If your TV set is a SD set, as it seems likely, there would be no need
> for the manual to talk about resolution at all, since all SD
> resolution is 480i.

Ok, that makes some sense, but I seem to remember some manufacturers
bragging about more lines in their display. I'd thought that HD was the
result of some greater number of scan lines thus giving finer detail to the
result. Of course, I suppose the transmission and reception of digital
signals figures in there somehow by eliminating the degradation you can get
with analog.

I'm getting a headache!


--
dvus
Anonymous
March 22, 2005 8:15:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Alex Perez <aperez@gmailDAWT.com> wrote:

>Barry F Margolius wrote:
>> "dvus" <dven1@adelphia.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Alan Figgatt wrote:
>>>
>>>>dvus wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>Roger wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Hi,
>>>>>>Prepare for your 8000 HD to crash. I had two; one lasted one day and
>>>>>>the next one lasted 3 weeks. Sudden hard drive crash because of
>>>>>>overheating; no fan in it. I now have had an 8300HD for 2 weeks, and
>>>>>>so far all OK. Don't save great programs for too long; watch them as
>>>>>>fast as you can or you might lose them.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>I've had it since last December or so and no crashes so far. I do get
>>>>>"grey-outs" once in a while that last a few seconds, and I lose
>>>>>audio on the lower channels that forces me to switch to a digital
>>>>>channel and back to fix.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>With the 8000, you have to use component out into your digital input
>>>>>>of the TV to watch HD and to get the best viewing. Surely your TV
>>>>>>has more than one component input. Watch DVD with another component
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>No, #1 is composite/S-Video, #2 is composite only, #3 is component.
>>>>>In addition there's a front composite and 75ohm inputs and outputs.
>>>>
>>>> I checked the Sony website for the manual for your model TV. Unless I
>>>>am missing something, your TV is NOT an HD capable TV, correct? The
>>>>manual spec page does not say much about the component port, but I
>>>>would assume it can only handle 480i or 480p input. If you do not
>>>>have a HD set, you might be better off with the standard SA8000, not
>>>>the HD model.
>>>
>>>The place that sold it to me said it was "HD ready", whatever that means.
>>>Unfortunately, I see nothing in the manual that says that, or even what
>>>resolution the damn thing is capable of displaying.
>>>
>>>
>>>> If your set is not an HD TV, you should probably leave the DVD player
>>>>hooked up to component, but use the S-Video from the Set Top Box. The
>>>>S-Video should give you a better picture than the RF cable. However,
>>>>if you use the speakers in the TV for sound, you will need to run the
>>>>stereo cables to the TV to carry the audio signal (or use digital
>>>>audio if you are set up for 5.1 sound and are willing to look at the
>>>>HD channels in SD mode).
>>>
>>><sigh...>, if I ever figure out what 480i and 480p are I'll be able to talk
>>>more intelligently. At this point, most of what I read in here is,
>>>unfortunately, over my head. Why can't there just be HiDef and LoDef or
>>>something? Every time I try to learn a little about this there's a bunch of
>>>new terms I've never heard of. It's no wonder the salespeople are so able to
>>>pull the wool over a person's eyes.
>>
>>
>> A quick resolution summary (though be warned I'm far from an expert):
>> All SD (standard definition) TV is 480i (480 lines, interlaced). HD
>> (high definition) TV can be any of a variety of resolutions, the most
>> common being: 480p (480 lines, progressive), 720p, and 1080i.
>>
>> If your TV set is a SD set, as it seems likely, there would be no need
>> for the manual to talk about resolution at all, since all SD
>> resolution is 480i.
>>
>> -barry
>I really kind of have to take issue with 480p being "high definition"
>TV. it's definately part of the DTV spec (Digital TV), but it's really a
>misnomer to call it high-def. I've seen it referred to as IDTV (Improved
>Definition) which is really all it is. Probably nobody would argue that
>720p and 1080i are truly high-definition, but 480p is nothing more than
> IDTV. That's not to say it's not much better than 480i in most
>circumstances, but let's call it what it actually is :) 


You are clearly right, but I guess I was simplifying to the point that
pretty much only HDTVs will display 480p. Yeah, I know there are a
few EDTVs (IDTV?) that also display it, but I thought a small error in
favor of simplification was worth it.

-barry
!