Moved OS hardrive to new system, wont boot

I am trying to move my os hardrive to a new computer..
Boot goes to options ,,safe mode ,,normal,,,Last known ...
Half way through the safe mode it reboots,, with a quick blue error screen.
Error screen is to quick to read...Just keeps rebooting..
My os hardrive has Xp on it ,,and works fine on my present computer.
The Components on the new system are differant,, so I figure there is a error while trying to load drivers with incompatable components...
How do I overcome this without a complete hardrive format,,and install...
Do I need to swap out all the parts,,from my old ,, to the new..for xp to load..
eg,, video card,, nic card,,,
Any input would be greatfully appreciated...
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  1. gen-mills said:
    I am trying to move my os hardrive to a new computer..
    Boot goes to options ,,safe mode ,,normal,,,Last known ...
    Half way through the safe mode it reboots,, with a quick blue error screen.
    Error screen is to quick to read...Just keeps rebooting..
    My os hardrive has Xp on it ,,and works fine on my present computer.
    The Components on the new system are differant,, so I figure there is a error while trying to load drivers with incompatable components...
    How do I overcome this without a complete hardrive format,,and install...
    Do I need to swap out all the parts,,from my old ,, to the new..for xp to load..
    eg,, video card,, nic card,,,
    Any input would be greatfully appreciated...



    Let me guess you had a Dell or HP before moving you HDD? If so you can't do that, thats copyright infringment. You need to tell us more like what your spec's were before and after you new build as I can only guess.
  2. You obviously are not aware of Windows protection. In a quick resume, Microsoft has built a security feature in Windows to prevent unauthorised installation of the OS in multiple systems. The protection works like this: it only allows you a finite number of hardware changes (new mobo, new HD, new CPU, etc) until it prevents the system from booting, producing the blue screen you encounter. That means that taking your HD and putting it in a whole new system (new hardware) means, lots of changes which triggers the protection. If you put your HD back in the old machine it will work fine. There is a workaround here:
    http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/moving_xp.html
    I have tried it and it actually works, just read the instructions carefully and don't rush cause it only gives you one chance to perform the repair.
    Good luck!
  3. Let's get a few things straightened out here:

    First, we have no knowledge of what the old machine from this user is. It may be a Dell/HP/etc., or it may not. Before you jump all over him for illegalities, you probably need to find that out for sure.

    Second, moving an OS (that you have purchased a legitimate license for) to another computer is perfectly 100% legal. The only restriction is that there can only be one legitimate activated copy of that OS. Moving a HD from one system to another perfectly falls within these limits. There is no "copyright infringement" here. Even if his machine came preinstalled with Windows XP from Dell or HP (or any other manufacturer), they of course will no longer offer support for your OS once it's transferred from the box they built, but there's nothing illegal about it. You paid for the license when you bought the machine.

    Windows probably will need to be reactivated on the new hardware once it's up and running. That's perfectly legal too. You will need to call Microsoft, give them the code on the screen, assure them that your copy of Windows is only running on one computer, and they will give you a code to reactivate it.

    The reason your machine won't boot properly is because the storage drivers that are currently loaded are for a different storage controller. You will need to preload storage drivers for your new motherboard while the system is running on the old hardware, or you will need to perform a repair installation of Windows XP once the HD is attached to the new motherboard.

    Preloading storage drivers on the old hardware is frequently not an option, since there's no way you can get Windows to detect hardware that's in the new machine while it's running on the old machine. In those cases, changing the storage controller on the old machine to a generic IDE driver will usually allow the Windows installation to boot on the new motherboard, where then you can install the specific storage controller drivers for the new motherboard.
  4. SomeJoe7777 said:

    Second, moving an OS (that you have purchased a legitimate license for) to another computer is perfectly 100% legal. The only restriction is that there can only be one legitimate activated copy of that OS.

    This is a false statement. I suggest SomeJoe7777 and the OP read the OEM license agreement that comes with most new computers. OEM agreements do not allow for the operating system (legally) to be transferred to a new computer. In the case of XP I expect the OP will get this to work with a reload, but in reality that will be an illegal copy of Windows at that point. Does it suck? You bet your ass it does... but that's Microsoft for you. Ever wonder why a retail copy of Windows costs so much more than the OEM copy?
  5. rodney_ws said:
    This is a false statement. I suggest SomeJoe7777 and the OP read the OEM license agreement that comes with most new computers. OEM agreements do not allow for the operating system (legally) to be transferred to a new computer. In the case of XP I expect the OP will get this to work with a reload, but in reality that will be an illegal copy of Windows at that point. Does it suck? You bet your ass it does... but that's Microsoft for you. Ever wonder why a retail copy of Windows costs so much more than the OEM copy?



    rodney_ws, you need to check your facts before posting. The reason why OEM is much cheaper than the retail is because you will not get any support from Microsoft. If you purchased and OEM version with, let's say DELL you will only get support from DELL. Should you move that license to another machine and activate it you will not receive any support from both DELL or MS. I own both a retail and an OEM version. My PC is running the retail and my laptop is running the OEM, i have made some changes to the Laptop and all I had to do was re-activate the OS through microsoft simple process. It has nothing to do with moving the OS to another PC.
  6. rodney_ws said:
    OEM agreements do not allow for the operating system (legally) to be transferred to a new computer. In the case of XP I expect the OP will get this to work with a reload, but in reality that will be an illegal copy of Windows at that point. Does it suck? You bet your ass it does... but that's Microsoft for you. Ever wonder why a retail copy of Windows costs so much more than the OEM copy?


    I reviewed the license agreement, and indeed, an OEM copy that was sold with a machine (or with a motherboard/processor/RAM) is non-transferrable to another machine. Which does suck. :pfff:

    However, that may still not be the situation that applies to the OP. He may have a box that he (or someone else) built for him, with a retail copy of Windows XP. Or, he may have a Dell/HP/etc. machine that originally shipped with an older version of Windows (like Windows 98 or Windows 2000), that he then purchased a retail upgrade to Windows XP. In those instances, he's allowed to move the OS to another machine.

    We will have to wait until he posts back and tells us to be sure.

    However, the cost of a retail copy over an OEM copy is not just for the license flexibility. The primary reason that the cost of the retail version is more is the support. With a retail copy, you can call/e-mail Microsoft for support. With an OEM copy, support is the responsibility of the system integrator (Dell/HP/etc.), or if you bought your own OEM copy, then it's your own responsibility.
  7. Sorry will3;

    rodney_ws is right. OEM license is married to a specific PC and is non-transferrable.

  8. WR2 said:
    Sorry will3;

    rodney_ws is right. OEM license is married to a specific PC and is non-transferrable.

    http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/3464/new033cp0.jpg


    My point was that the OEM price vs. the retail price has nothing to do with the licensing of the OS. Not the moving of the license.
  9. I've done it. The OEM version on my laptop came with My pc. It was a 32 bit version and I wanted the 64it version. All i had to do was call MS and tell them that the hard drive failed so i had to re-install. But my main point was that the cost OEM Version vs. the retail version has nothing to do with the moving, installing, or upgrading of hardware with the OS, it ONLY has to do with the support that you will receive for the version. OEM= support from computer vendor or no support / Retail= Support from MS. Hopefully this is clear now.
  10. That fact that it can be done isnt the same as the fact you violated the OEM license.
    You said "rodney_ws, you need to check your facts before posting" and you should have followed your own advice.
  11. WR2 said:
    That fact that it can be done isnt the same as the fact you violated the OEM license.
    You said "rodney_ws, you need to check your facts before posting" and you should have followed your own advice.



    He does need to check is facts before posting something that he is not correct in. And you obviously have some difficulty reading, Look over my posts again and you should be able to see my main point.

    The only good advice given in this thread is exactly what MrsBytch said. Everything else does not help the original thread.
  12. will31 has right. I change the whole configuration, and all i have to do is to re-activate again.
  13. But that wasn't the answer to the question of gen-mills. Try with ERD Commander. Make first boot device CD-ROM, and put the CD with ERD Commander in drive. Wait. You'll see what happends.
  14. will31 said:
    And you obviously have some difficulty reading, Look over my posts again and you should be able to see my main point.
    So I took your advice:
    Quote:
    The reason why OEM is much cheaper than the retail is because you will not get any support from Microsoft.
    Support from Microsoft is available to OEM license holders. We get support through service packs, system and security updates between SPs. There is also the MS Knowledgebase, community support and a bunch of other Self Support Options. A retail license holder is eligible for free installation support (direct support by e-mail, chat or phone) and 2 further support requests. After that they pay the same costs as an OEM license holder pays when requesting support from MS. Beyond that support limit the only extra value a retail license has is that it can be transferred to another computer system by the license holder.
    Quote:
    If you purchased and OEM version with, let's say DELL you will only get
    support from DELL. Should you move that license to another machine and
    activate it you will not receive any support from both DELL or MS
    As noted above OEM license holders can get support from MS. And OEM license holders are not permitted to "move that license" by the terms of the OEM EULA.

    Does it happen anyway? As rodney_ws said
    Quote:
    In the case of XP I expect the OP will get this to work with a reload,
    but in reality that will be an illegal copy of Windows at that point.
    I hope you can see my point about checking your own "facts". Your "main point" may have been lost in the glare of your own factual lapses.

    Personally I thought darkguset [:wr2] gave the best advice to the OP (sorry MrsBytch :whistle: ).
  15. Somewhere we are mis-understanding each other.

    I have an OEM version of windows vista, this is the full version not an upgrade. I have moved it from my PC to my laptop, After installing it on my laptop, I had to call microsoft to re-activate the program, the only thing I was asked was if this version/CD was installed on any other PC at the moment. I told him no which it wasn't, he proceeded to explain that I cannot have the same copy of Vista installed on two PC at the same time. After he was finished explaining, he placed me on hold for two minutes and issued the re-activation key. He never mentioned to me that since I moved it to another computer it was now an "illegal copy", when I go to the device manager it clearly shows the little blue box that states it's a genuine copy of Windows.

    Now with you stating that "A retail license holder is eligible for free installation support (direct support by e-mail, chat or phone) and 2 further support requests."
    That is exactly what I meant when I said that and OEM version is not entitled to support from MS. As smart you claim/act to be I sure didn't think that I needed to specify what kind of support I meant, we all know that every Genuine copy of Windows is eligible for Updates and Service packs, but I however cannot contact MS for free installation support of any kind, and I do not receive the additional 2 free support requests. This is the sole reason for the price being cheaper for the OEM vs. Retail version.

    I still belive that MRS_Bytch gave the best advice, And I'm not knocking the advice that darkguset but anything thing that needs a work around is not always the best way to go about fixing a problem. Do a clean format and re-install the OS.
  16. For some reason the OEM license claims you can't move the OEM install to a new machine, but their phone people allow it in some cases. I did it when my motherboard failed on an old machine and I couldn't find a replacement motherboard at a decent price. So I built a media center PC around the hardware and a similar new motherboard. Thecnically I violated the license, but was able to talk their phone people into allowing it.
  17. Actually, this has little or nothing to do with licensing or activation.

    Try the same thing with a Windows 2000 OS. Put that hard drive in another system with a different motherboard/different drive controller and the same thing will happen: BSOD.

    The reason this happens is because the OS does not recognize the new drive controller yet.

    Repair-install should fix the problem, but after XP SP2 and IE7, this is becoming more difficult.
  18. Yeah' its fairly hit and miss....some times it works(Rare)...

    Best bet is to get the key from the original machine...install fresh....if they tell you you can not active....call ms with the number they tell you to use and say lightning took out the board and it was discontinued :)

    In the case the replacement is for the same computer just that it is imposable to get a identical board.....bang!! good to go....They will give you a new number.....

    If its HP/Compaq or Dell you may not even need to call since sometimes the activation is not even hardware locked as it was bought in a bunch... so the new hardware(i have never seen a hardware lock but they say it happens....) will get locked and off you go

    I know once i tried to activate an HP and the license was never even active on MS'd DB.....so when i called then they added it and said it happens with large companies some times....
  19. Will31,

    Not to jump on you but you really don't know enough about Microsoft licensing. My company had a problem a while back and we got fined for licensing issues so we know a whole lot about licensing now.

    OEM licenses cannot legally be moved to another computer. Even though Microsoft allowed you to activate your copy after you moved it doesn't make it legal according to the license agreement. OEM copies of OS's can't even be sold without a qualifying computer sold with them. I know you can get OEM copies everywhere (some sites were selling them with the purchase of a mouse or a stick of ram to get around the "must be bought with hardware" issue) but they can't be legally sold.

    You need to be careful what advice you give to people.
  20. this has nothing to do with licensing or moving copies of windows here and there, i have both versions (OEM and Retail) and the simple fact of the matter is that windows likes to take a **** anytime you change things because of the drivers associated with the devices. OEM or not, you move windows or you change something in your system you can kiss windows goodbye. there are ways around it but they are temp fixes (i.e. win recover console, deleting sys32 files and copying new ones from the disk) at best and will not leave you with that clean, plaque free, freshly washed windows feeling.

    best rule of thumb: beat your wife with a stick no larger than your thumb

    2nd best rule of thumb: assume windows will take a **** anytime you breathe on it and prepare your current software, pictures, pr0n, music etc for a reformat i.e. store it some place other than your windows partition.

    3rd best rule of thumb: you can pick your friends and you can pick your nose, you can not, however, pick your friends nose
  21. I've had some luck with reusing OSes. Usually they are retail OSes though, and thus it is legal to do so! Always uninstall all your IDE controllers from device manager before removing the old hardware!
  22. My Two Cent (not normally worth much). Most of my copies of XP are oem versions, Vista was an OEM version upgrade.

    While usoft agreement for oem version ties it to a specific system, Consummers have some (repeat some rights that companies try to reduce) rights. Microsofts Main impitus is that a vailid copy is installed on one, and only one computer at a time. This is why they will normally reissue a activation code when you transfer the operating system to a new computer even if an OEM version, H__L it doesn't take a lightning strike to wipe out a MB.

    I have to also agree with MrsB on this one. Trying to get rid of ALL the driver info in the DOT ini files is very difficult (not just the storage device) which may case stability problems down line.

    editted couple of typos
  23. parkerkane said:
    Will31,

    Not to jump on you but you really don't know enough about Microsoft licensing. My company had a problem a while back and we got fined for licensing issues so we know a whole lot about licensing now.

    OEM licenses cannot legally be moved to another computer. Even though Microsoft allowed you to activate your copy after you moved it doesn't make it legal according to the license agreement. OEM copies of OS's can't even be sold without a qualifying computer sold with them. I know you can get OEM copies everywhere (some sites were selling them with the purchase of a mouse or a stick of ram to get around the "must be bought with hardware" issue) but they can't be legally sold.

    You need to be careful what advice you give to people.



    Obviously you don't know much about OEM software, If it was illegal to sell with out any hardware don't you think that MS would have stopped TigerDirect, Newegg, or anyother Online retailer from selling them? I pruchased both of my copies without any piece of hardware, And I know a few of my friends who have done the same. You can purchase the OEM software without any hardware with the understanding that you will not receive any of the free technical support that would normally come with it if you had purchased it with a system from Dell, HP, Alienware etc., or if you purchased the retail version.

    I'm no longer going to argue the point of moving the software, I already stated what the MS techs told me when I had to re-activate my copy of Vista.

    Since we've veered off from helping the initial poster, I would still advise you to take MrsBytchs' advice.
  24. Okay, the OP said he did NOT want to do a fresh install and SECOND, you sure as hell do not have to reinstall, there is this little thing called the HARDWARE ABSTRACTION LAYER; if one removes the driver in question causing the problem, windows will attempt to replace it. I have done motherboard swaps without a reinstall and the notion that you HAVE to is false, period. See there is this safe mode thingy too....
  25. That said, I am not giving instructions on how to pirate...
  26. parkerkane, you're talking about two things. Home use and Bussines use. If you have company, and you try to install OEM Windows on other comp., of course you'll be fined. But if you do that at home, people that works at MS will gladly help you, and reactivate your copy of windows. That's not illegal, and nobody wouldn't came into my house and fine me.
    sorry for my english
  27. Wow... Thanks for all the input..
    I didn't realize I would cause such a heated debate....
    I was aware that the best solution was a fresh reinstall, but was hoping for a workaround..
    All my systems I put together my self with a purchased OEM version of Xp Pro...Yes I have 4 computers running the same copy...As far as the legal issues...not to concerned....
    I just swapped the hardrive ,, thinking ,,for a quick get up and go...
    If the best solution is a reinstall..With the cost of hardrives... best to just put a new one in the new PC,, and do an install...
    Keep the old one as it is..
    Thankyou for all the input.....
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