Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Does replacing motherboard require new OS install?

Last response: in Systems
Share
July 30, 2007 7:57:30 AM

Hi,http://img.tomshardware.com/forum/uk/icones/message/fix...
[fixed]
In my ex-Inel based system, mother board died (first replaced power supply but nothing happen it is just dead - I assume it is Mobo gone down south). I am ordering AMD cpu and Asus mobo for that plus the memory (nothing high end just a home pc). My question is that do I have to re-install the OS (XP - Pro) or can I just run repair on existing HD? In all reality I do not want to re-install all the programs I had installed in past 4 years or so. In case if I have to re-install everything, I rather buy a new HD and start from the scratch, keeping old drive to retrieve data. :cry: 

Any help, suggestion, ideas, guidance and your time is very appreciated.

Danny :
July 30, 2007 8:03:33 AM

as long as your hdd wasn't damaged when your board died it should work just like normal assuming you won't have any OS cpu incompatibility issues.
July 30, 2007 8:17:38 AM

Sometimes it just good to start over OS wise. The reason I say this is when your build is 4 years old your OS can sometimes be error prone because program can fall out of place, get fragmented and when files get fragmented over long periods of time those files sometime get writing over and changed. To be on the safe side I'd.......
Related resources
July 30, 2007 8:21:30 AM

yes ti does, but choose to reapir th e installation and you will keep files/programms and settings
July 30, 2007 8:53:32 AM

If your hard drive is not damaged and after everything is installed, hardware wise, Microsoft will require you to register(?) your operating system. You may have to change your installation code. If you need to call them by phone let them know that your OS is on only one drive and you installed a new motherboard, etc. Your OS is connected with your hard drive. If you were having no problems with your system I wouldn't change the OS.
July 30, 2007 2:27:40 PM

Valdis is right, usually it depends on how many things you change at once then that whole big mess happens, I change my board and PSU at the same time and had to repair-reinstall Windows {Xp}.

after just uninstall the old boards drivers + install new boards drivers.

did you send away for you free SP2 disk?
July 30, 2007 3:44:12 PM

I have tried this and usually had problems. In theory simply doing a reinstall of the chipset and other drivers "should" work but it never has for me. If your replacement board is the same board then you shouldnt have to do anything. If you OS installation is 4 years old you should do a full format and OS reinstall just to remove the 4 years of clutter fromt he machine.
July 30, 2007 4:13:51 PM

Is this a Dell/Gateway/etc? If so, when you replace the motherboard you also lose your Windows license. I've run into this situation several times when replacing motherboards for friends on machines that have the MB die.

The copy of Windows is somehow tied to the motherboard, and on the first start after installing the new MB, you are prompted with some Windows activation screens. Hopefully this isn't the case but I thought I'd throw it out there.
a b V Motherboard
July 30, 2007 5:01:20 PM

if you do have to reactivate, just give MS a call tell them you switched around some hardware and you need a new activation code. they tell it to you over the phone.
July 30, 2007 8:34:13 PM

skittle is right. The same thing happened to me because I matched the new HD with a current motherboard. Again, the OS is connected with the hard drive. You cannot install the same OS with the same activation code on more than one hard drive.
July 30, 2007 8:36:42 PM

Did that last post make any sense? I set up a system on a motherboard that had been used with another hard drive. So which is it? Is the system connected with the hard drive or the motherboard?
July 31, 2007 6:59:34 AM

Guys and Gals,

Thanks for your time and advices. I really appreciate and very thankful to all of you.

My situation is that PSU was first thing to replace and that confirmed (IMO) that board went bad. Now to replace just the board (to match existing CPU 478 prescott and 750M PC2100 memory) I may spend $70 max but don't know when CPU / Memory will say goodbye. On the other hand upgrading will cost $200 more but hopefully a more reliable system for a little while (I am planing AMD 64X2 4000, 2G, and an Asus board). This may be more of HT then Home Office PC. So I am more inclined to just upgrade, anyway.

I totally agree with a complete clean new install of OS, but since I have been trying to maintain to keep registry as clean as possible, I will try to install new drivers and if needed run repair OS. Otherwise, I will take a bullet and get a SATA drive and install OS on that.

I hope, I am not offending anyone with this decision and Once again, I very very appreciate your time, thoughts, guidance and help.

Peace and love for all
Danny
July 31, 2007 7:30:50 AM

Onlydanny said:
Guys and Gals,


I hope, I am not offending anyone with this decision and Once again, I very very appreciate your time, thoughts, guidance and help.

Peace and love for all
Danny


Not at all, I agree with your assesment and good luck to you.
July 31, 2007 8:02:39 AM

Onlydanny said:
Hi,http://img.tomshardware.com/forum/uk/icones/messag e/fixe.gif
[fixed]
In my ex-Inel based system, mother board died (first replaced power supply but nothing happen it is just dead - I assume it is Mobo gone down south). I am ordering AMD cpu and Asus mobo for that plus the memory (nothing high end just a home pc). My question is that do I have to re-install the OS (XP - Pro) or can I just run repair on existing HD? In all reality I do not want to re-install all the programs I had installed in past 4 years or so. In case if I have to re-install everything, I rather buy a new HD and start from the scratch, keeping old drive to retrieve data. :cry: 

Any help, suggestion, ideas, guidance and your time is very appreciated.

Danny :


Put your system drive into an external housing or a good friend's pc and do a backup of your data.

You will probably have to do a new install, so better to be prepared. And you will also probably have to talk to someone with an accent that I find difficult to interpret, but at least they are friendly....
August 1, 2007 3:32:57 AM

To clear up issues here...

Since February 2006, License recognition for all versions of Windows OS's are based upon the motherboard, especially impacted were the OEM versions of Windows. Note that licensing is different from activation. A simple hardware change of a processor, hard drive, or motherboard, and sometimes other components, requires reactivation.

If a person purchases an OEM version of windows with a new system, then the motherboard fails, the copy of Windows is now defunct and can not be transferred to another computer. The user would have to go buy a retail version of windows. Retail versions of Windows can be transferred to another motherboard however.

All versions of windows also have the restriction that they can only be licensed to 1 pc at a time (Unless mass licensed through OEM system builder licensing). Therefore, technically, there should only be 1 copy of the software on any hard drive at a time, in use. However, with laws in the United States, as well as some other countries, it is legal to have 1 copy in use, as well as a backup copy for storage purposes, in case the original copy fails.

Some argue that having the original CD is the storage copy, while others argue that having a 2nd hard drive with the OS on it qualifies as the 2nd copy. There have been no court decisions to date as far as I know, which have truly defined how this is to be interpreted.
August 1, 2007 8:04:07 AM

Thanks for that in-depth explaination.
August 1, 2007 9:12:34 AM

Thanks for the explanation! Looks like you would be screwed if your store bought PC dies and you can't get the exact mobo as a replacement. Ouch!
!