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RAID Controler and HDD setup q's

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September 25, 2007 9:14:20 PM

I would like to set up a RAID 0 with a separate independent backup drive. Would a controller have that option?

Is it possible to have this setup?
1 Small Fast HDD with just the OS on it
1 Larger Fast HDD with designated software on it, like games,
1 Large HDD for basic storage, pics, music


September 26, 2007 10:20:08 PM

Yes, but that's not RAID. For RAID you buy a matched pair of medium to fast drives. You then setup a RAID 0 of 2x size of drive. You can then setup a primary partition of 50 - 60 Gb for the OS ans an extended partition of the res, which you can set up as 1 or 2 Logical drives for storage.

Mike.
September 27, 2007 9:32:14 PM

Ok when i posted that i was a RIAD noob. Ive been reading for 2 days, also bought the latest issue of maximumPC. It has a good article about RAID and performance gains. Im now between RAID 5 using 3 raptors and a controler. Or going RAID 0 with 2 raptors using my onboard. The only thing is if i went RAID 0 could i have a separate (probibly external) HDD to backup the RAID 0 data.
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a b G Storage
September 28, 2007 10:51:14 PM

Hey Rasta Mon,
It depends on your usage. Are you setting up a server? If so, then a raid 5 might be a good idea. If you are looking to make a good gaming setup I would recommend the raid 0 plus storage drive.

Raid 5 originally seems like a good idea for gaming, since it has the quickest read speeds of all the raids. However, with 3 drives (and the parity spread across all drives), this means more overall ACCESS time, which is bad for gaming. Just think of how long your levels would take to load if you had to wait for the computer to access all 3 drives.

You are going to get the best gaming performance from a raid 0 setup. Raid 0 is a terrible idea for a server, because if one drive fails you lose the whole array. Not only that, but you get half data capacity. If you have 2 500Gb drives, you'll only have 500Gb total drive space in raid 0.
But like I said, you will get the zippiest performance this way.

This is why you will see many people with a 3rd drive, usually not a raptor. This other drive will be used for backing up the data you don't want to lose if one of the discs in your raid array fails. Usually not a raptor because people are more interested in Gb/dollar ratio. A nice, fat drive that won't get too hot because it is just sitting there until needed.

For my latest build, I originally wanted to do a raid 5. I decided against it based on this information, which I garnered through various web resources, forums, and magazines.
It is a very simplistic explanation, and can probably be picked apart if anyone so chooses, but it gives you a general idea of the strengths and weaknesses of raid5 vs raid 0.

Don't do raid 5, boombaclod

(don't know how to spell that, but that is how it sounds.)
:) 

oh yeah, I also will be getting an external for backups. That should work with any setup, raid or not.
September 30, 2007 12:33:58 AM

buzznut said:
You are going to get the best gaming performance from a raid 0 setup. Raid 0 is a terrible idea for a server, because if one drive fails you lose the whole array. Not only that, but you get half data capacity. If you have 2 500Gb drives, you'll only have 500Gb total drive space in raid 0.
But like I said, you will get the zippiest performance this way.


No. RAID 0 gives you the combined space of the drives. A RAID 0 comprised of 2 500GB drives will give you a 1TB volume.

RAID 1 (mirroring) gives you half the space. 2 500GB drives in a RAID 1 gives you a 500GB volume, and the ability to lose either drive without losing any data.

RAID 0 does not necessarily give the fastest gaming performance (or necessarily the fastest performance in other applications). RAID 0's speed is highly application dependent.
October 4, 2007 11:21:15 PM

Should i use a controller or use the onboard RAID on my ASUS P5K3
!