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Sidebars/letterboxing on HDTV?

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March 20, 2005 6:01:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hi,

I just purchased a 61in. HDTV monitor. Someone told me that I should avoid
"burn in", that is to avoid having black sidebars and letter boxing. If
consistently watch standard-definition (4:3 aspect ratio) programming on a
wide-screen (16:9 aspect ratio) HD programming with sidebars activated over
very long periods of time, this may ruin the HDTV's ability to display
colors evenly across the screen. Similarly, constant viewing of 16:9
wide-screen content on a 4:3 aspect ratio HDTV with letter boxing can cause
the same problem.

My question is what about watching DVD? All my DVD discs are in wide screen
format and it always show letter boxing both at the top and down. Will this
ruin the HDTV too or I have to switch to zoom or cinema mode to have the
movie occupy the whole screen. Any recommendation is appreciated.

David
Anonymous
March 20, 2005 7:04:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <Uen%d.35192$ZE5.22971@fed1read03>, "David" <dy168@cox.net>
wrote:

> I just purchased a 61in. HDTV monitor. Someone told me that I should
> avoid "burn in", that is to avoid having black sidebars and letter
> boxing.

A lot depends on the technology; if the TV is DLP, "burn in" is not an
issue. If it's CRT or Plasma, it is an issue. If it's LCD or LCOS, I
think it's not an issue, but I'm not sure.

--
Stop Mad Cowboy Disease: Impeach the son of a Bush.
Anonymous
March 20, 2005 7:30:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
news:Uen%d.35192$ZE5.22971@fed1read03...
> Hi,
>
> I just purchased a 61in. HDTV monitor. Someone told me that I should
avoid
> "burn in", that is to avoid having black sidebars and letter boxing. If
> consistently watch standard-definition (4:3 aspect ratio) programming on a
> wide-screen (16:9 aspect ratio) HD programming with sidebars activated
over
> very long periods of time, this may ruin the HDTV's ability to display
> colors evenly across the screen. Similarly, constant viewing of 16:9
> wide-screen content on a 4:3 aspect ratio HDTV with letter boxing can
cause
> the same problem.
>
> My question is what about watching DVD? All my DVD discs are in wide
screen
> format and it always show letter boxing both at the top and down. Will
this
> ruin the HDTV too or I have to switch to zoom or cinema mode to have the
> movie occupy the whole screen. Any recommendation is appreciated.
>
> David

Assuming you have a PDP or CRT based set, otherwise it is not an issue.
Just turn your contrast down as much as you can and still get a picture with
good bright whites, then adjust your brightness for good blacks, but not
making the dark parts of the pix do dark that you lose detail in near black
scenes. Then mix up your viewing as much as possible, using fill modes as
much as you can stand for casual viewing. Burn-in is a real phenomenon, but
with lowered contrast levels and varied viewing it should not be a problem.
Don't leave the same channel on all the time with banners or logos, either.
If you are concerned about whether it is occurring, get a test disk with a
white raster pattern and check it now and then.

Leonard
Related resources
Anonymous
March 20, 2005 8:39:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

--
X-No-archive: yes

"David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
news:Uen%d.35192$ZE5.22971@fed1read03...
> Hi,
>
> I just purchased a 61in. HDTV monitor. Someone told me that I should
> avoid "burn in", that is to avoid having black sidebars and letter boxing.
> If consistently watch standard-definition (4:3 aspect ratio) programming
> on a wide-screen (16:9 aspect ratio) HD programming with sidebars
> activated over very long periods of time, this may ruin the HDTV's
> ability to display colors evenly across the screen. Similarly, constant
> viewing of 16:9 wide-screen content on a 4:3 aspect ratio HDTV with letter
> boxing can cause the same problem.
>
======================================
If you adjust your set properly, burn-in should not be a significant
problem.
Usually sets are WAY too high in brightness and contrast out of the box.
========================================

> My question is what about watching DVD? All my DVD discs are in wide
> screen format and it always show letter boxing both at the top and down.

=================================
If ALL your DVDs show letterboxing, something is set wrong.
Only about half should be 2.35:1 (which shows bars top and bottom).
The other half should be 1.85:1 and would display virtually no letterboxing.

Check your DVD player and make sure it is set to 16:9 and the you TV is set
for "full" or whatever it needs to be for proper display.
==================================

>Will this ruin the HDTV too or I have to switch to zoom or cinema mode to
>have the movie occupy the whole screen. Any recommendation is appreciated.
>
> David
>
March 21, 2005 12:59:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hi Leonard,

What kind of test disk are you talking about and where I can get one.
Thanks

David

"Leonard Caillouet" <no@no.com> wrote in message
news:Qtn%d.70241$SF.6936@lakeread08...
>
> "David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
> news:Uen%d.35192$ZE5.22971@fed1read03...
>> Hi,
>>
>> I just purchased a 61in. HDTV monitor. Someone told me that I should
> avoid
>> "burn in", that is to avoid having black sidebars and letter boxing. If
>> consistently watch standard-definition (4:3 aspect ratio) programming on
>> a
>> wide-screen (16:9 aspect ratio) HD programming with sidebars activated
> over
>> very long periods of time, this may ruin the HDTV's ability to display
>> colors evenly across the screen. Similarly, constant viewing of 16:9
>> wide-screen content on a 4:3 aspect ratio HDTV with letter boxing can
> cause
>> the same problem.
>>
>> My question is what about watching DVD? All my DVD discs are in wide
> screen
>> format and it always show letter boxing both at the top and down. Will
> this
>> ruin the HDTV too or I have to switch to zoom or cinema mode to have the
>> movie occupy the whole screen. Any recommendation is appreciated.
>>
>> David
>
> Assuming you have a PDP or CRT based set, otherwise it is not an issue.
> Just turn your contrast down as much as you can and still get a picture
> with
> good bright whites, then adjust your brightness for good blacks, but not
> making the dark parts of the pix do dark that you lose detail in near
> black
> scenes. Then mix up your viewing as much as possible, using fill modes as
> much as you can stand for casual viewing. Burn-in is a real phenomenon,
> but
> with lowered contrast levels and varied viewing it should not be a
> problem.
> Don't leave the same channel on all the time with banners or logos,
> either.
> If you are concerned about whether it is occurring, get a test disk with a
> white raster pattern and check it now and then.
>
> Leonard
>
>
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 8:05:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Richard C." <post-age@spamcop.net> wrote in
news:423e2557$0$5862$9a6e19ea@news.newshosting.com:

> --
> X-No-archive: yes
>
> "David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
> news:Uen%d.35192$ZE5.22971@fed1read03...
>> Hi,
>>
>> I just purchased a 61in. HDTV monitor. Someone told me that I should
>> avoid "burn in", that is to avoid having black sidebars and letter
>> boxing. If consistently watch standard-definition (4:3 aspect ratio)
>> programming on a wide-screen (16:9 aspect ratio) HD programming with
>> sidebars activated over very long periods of time, this may ruin the
>> HDTV's ability to display colors evenly across the screen. Similarly,
>> constant viewing of 16:9 wide-screen content on a 4:3 aspect ratio
>> HDTV with letter boxing can cause the same problem.
>>
> ======================================
> If you adjust your set properly, burn-in should not be a significant
> problem.
> Usually sets are WAY too high in brightness and contrast out of the
> box. ========================================

My Samsung was a case in point. It's a 27-inch CRT set and I was the
first person to take it out of the box. The contrast and brightness were
turned up to the point where the image was blurred and way too bright for
even my poor old eyes. And the saturation was frankly garish. I set
custom levels the way I like them (and am not afraid to tweak them on a
per-program basis) and found that the picture geometry was way off, too.
A call to a friend in the business and an email or two later and an hour
with the service menu and I had it all set up to my satisfaction.

I'm spoiled rotten, though. My brother bought a nice new Panasonic SD
27" set just a few months before I got mine and I can hardly bare to
watch it. I mean it has visible horizontal scan lines and, though it
does a fair job on 480p from the DVD player, it's still an order of
magnitude worse, even at that task than mine. Of course I did pay a lot
more....so I could watch the 1080i stuff on my satellite feed!

>> My question is what about watching DVD? All my DVD discs are in wide
>> screen format and it always show letter boxing both at the top and
>> down.

> =================================
> If ALL your DVDs show letterboxing, something is set wrong.
> Only about half should be 2.35:1 (which shows bars top and bottom).
> The other half should be 1.85:1 and would display virtually no
> letterboxing.
>
> Check your DVD player and make sure it is set to 16:9 and the you TV
> is set for "full" or whatever it needs to be for proper display.
> ==================================

My Samsung DVD player has a feature called EZ-view which allows you to
fill any screen with the picture (at the expense of cutting some off).
On very wide 2.35:1, this means cutting the edges off to trim it to a
full 16:9 image (or even a 4:3 image if the player is in that mode).

Keeping the brightness and contrast at reasonable levels are the best way
to cut down on burn-in, though. And mixing full-screen programming with
the letterboxed and pillar-boxed stuff is another way to minimize it.

61" sounds like a projection, plasma or DLP set, though. If it's DLP,
then burn-in is not even an issue.


--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667

A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
March 21, 2005 8:05:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hi all,

Thanks for all the reply. I have the 61" RCA Scenium DLP HD Monitor. So, I
guess this is not a big issue for me then. Thanks again.

David


"Dave Oldridge" <doldridg@leavethisoutshaw.ca> wrote in message
news:Xns961FD67C56E0Fdoldridgsprintca@24.71.223.159...
> "Richard C." <post-age@spamcop.net> wrote in
> news:423e2557$0$5862$9a6e19ea@news.newshosting.com:
>
>> --
>> X-No-archive: yes
>>
>> "David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
>> news:Uen%d.35192$ZE5.22971@fed1read03...
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> I just purchased a 61in. HDTV monitor. Someone told me that I should
>>> avoid "burn in", that is to avoid having black sidebars and letter
>>> boxing. If consistently watch standard-definition (4:3 aspect ratio)
>>> programming on a wide-screen (16:9 aspect ratio) HD programming with
>>> sidebars activated over very long periods of time, this may ruin the
>>> HDTV's ability to display colors evenly across the screen. Similarly,
>>> constant viewing of 16:9 wide-screen content on a 4:3 aspect ratio
>>> HDTV with letter boxing can cause the same problem.
>>>
>> ======================================
>> If you adjust your set properly, burn-in should not be a significant
>> problem.
>> Usually sets are WAY too high in brightness and contrast out of the
>> box. ========================================
>
> My Samsung was a case in point. It's a 27-inch CRT set and I was the
> first person to take it out of the box. The contrast and brightness were
> turned up to the point where the image was blurred and way too bright for
> even my poor old eyes. And the saturation was frankly garish. I set
> custom levels the way I like them (and am not afraid to tweak them on a
> per-program basis) and found that the picture geometry was way off, too.
> A call to a friend in the business and an email or two later and an hour
> with the service menu and I had it all set up to my satisfaction.
>
> I'm spoiled rotten, though. My brother bought a nice new Panasonic SD
> 27" set just a few months before I got mine and I can hardly bare to
> watch it. I mean it has visible horizontal scan lines and, though it
> does a fair job on 480p from the DVD player, it's still an order of
> magnitude worse, even at that task than mine. Of course I did pay a lot
> more....so I could watch the 1080i stuff on my satellite feed!
>
>>> My question is what about watching DVD? All my DVD discs are in wide
>>> screen format and it always show letter boxing both at the top and
>>> down.
>
>> =================================
>> If ALL your DVDs show letterboxing, something is set wrong.
>> Only about half should be 2.35:1 (which shows bars top and bottom).
>> The other half should be 1.85:1 and would display virtually no
>> letterboxing.
>>
>> Check your DVD player and make sure it is set to 16:9 and the you TV
>> is set for "full" or whatever it needs to be for proper display.
>> ==================================
>
> My Samsung DVD player has a feature called EZ-view which allows you to
> fill any screen with the picture (at the expense of cutting some off).
> On very wide 2.35:1, this means cutting the edges off to trim it to a
> full 16:9 image (or even a 4:3 image if the player is in that mode).
>
> Keeping the brightness and contrast at reasonable levels are the best way
> to cut down on burn-in, though. And mixing full-screen programming with
> the letterboxed and pillar-boxed stuff is another way to minimize it.
>
> 61" sounds like a projection, plasma or DLP set, though. If it's DLP,
> then burn-in is not even an issue.
>
>
> --
> Dave Oldridge+
> ICQ 1800667
>
> A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
>
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 10:16:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

David wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> Thanks for all the reply. I have the 61" RCA Scenium DLP HD Monitor.
So, I
> guess this is not a big issue for me then. Thanks again.

But there's no reason your set should be adjusted incorrectly. You'll
love the picture much more when it's right.
March 21, 2005 11:48:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Only when the TV first came out of the box, the contrast was set at 100% and
vibrant mode. I already adjusted it accordingly. But no matter how I set
my DVD's setting (16:9), the letterbox still showing unless I switch to full
mode on the TV and that will cut off the captions and makes someone's face
longer looking.

"Larry Bud" <larrybud2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1111418206.493717.200370@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> David wrote:
>> Hi all,
>>
>> Thanks for all the reply. I have the 61" RCA Scenium DLP HD Monitor.
> So, I
>> guess this is not a big issue for me then. Thanks again.
>
> But there's no reason your set should be adjusted incorrectly. You'll
> love the picture much more when it's right.
>
March 21, 2005 11:54:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Well Richard, my DVD is always set at 16.9 setting. If I set my TV to full
mode, it looks funny, the closed caption is half gone and everything looks a
little elongated, for example, a person's face.

David

"Richard C." <post-age@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:423e2557$0$5862$9a6e19ea@news.newshosting.com...
> --
> X-No-archive: yes
>
> "David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
> news:Uen%d.35192$ZE5.22971@fed1read03...
>> Hi,
>>
>> I just purchased a 61in. HDTV monitor. Someone told me that I should
>> avoid "burn in", that is to avoid having black sidebars and letter
>> boxing. If consistently watch standard-definition (4:3 aspect ratio)
>> programming on a wide-screen (16:9 aspect ratio) HD programming with
>> sidebars activated over very long periods of time, this may ruin the
>> HDTV's ability to display colors evenly across the screen. Similarly,
>> constant viewing of 16:9 wide-screen content on a 4:3 aspect ratio HDTV
>> with letter boxing can cause the same problem.
>>
> ======================================
> If you adjust your set properly, burn-in should not be a significant
> problem.
> Usually sets are WAY too high in brightness and contrast out of the box.
> ========================================
>
>> My question is what about watching DVD? All my DVD discs are in wide
>> screen format and it always show letter boxing both at the top and down.
>
> =================================
> If ALL your DVDs show letterboxing, something is set wrong.
> Only about half should be 2.35:1 (which shows bars top and bottom).
> The other half should be 1.85:1 and would display virtually no
> letterboxing.
>
> Check your DVD player and make sure it is set to 16:9 and the you TV is
> set for "full" or whatever it needs to be for proper display.
> ==================================
>
>>Will this ruin the HDTV too or I have to switch to zoom or cinema mode to
>>have the movie occupy the whole screen. Any recommendation is
>>appreciated.
>>
>> David
>>
>
>
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 12:57:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

--
X-No-archive: yes

"David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
news:UYC%d.149834$FM3.82325@fed1read02...
> Well Richard, my DVD is always set at 16.9 setting. If I set my TV to
> full mode, it looks funny, the closed caption is half gone and everything
> looks a little elongated, for example, a person's face.
>
> David

==========================
Then "full" is not the name used in your menu.
The point is, that movies come in many aspect ratios and 1.85:1 movies
should almost fill your screen.
2.35:1 movies should have bars top and bottom.

Is that your experience?
If not, make sure you watch DVD with the same settings that you watch HDTV.
If you use component inputs and have a progressive scan DVD player it should
lock in that mode automatically.
===============================
>
> "Richard C." <post-age@spamcop.net> wrote in message
> news:423e2557$0$5862$9a6e19ea@news.newshosting.com...
>> --
>> X-No-archive: yes
>>
>> "David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
>> news:Uen%d.35192$ZE5.22971@fed1read03...
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> I just purchased a 61in. HDTV monitor. Someone told me that I should
>>> avoid "burn in", that is to avoid having black sidebars and letter
>>> boxing. If consistently watch standard-definition (4:3 aspect ratio)
>>> programming on a wide-screen (16:9 aspect ratio) HD programming with
>>> sidebars activated over very long periods of time, this may ruin the
>>> HDTV's ability to display colors evenly across the screen. Similarly,
>>> constant viewing of 16:9 wide-screen content on a 4:3 aspect ratio HDTV
>>> with letter boxing can cause the same problem.
>>>
>> ======================================
>> If you adjust your set properly, burn-in should not be a significant
>> problem.
>> Usually sets are WAY too high in brightness and contrast out of the box.
>> ========================================
>>
>>> My question is what about watching DVD? All my DVD discs are in wide
>>> screen format and it always show letter boxing both at the top and down.
>>
>> =================================
>> If ALL your DVDs show letterboxing, something is set wrong.
>> Only about half should be 2.35:1 (which shows bars top and bottom).
>> The other half should be 1.85:1 and would display virtually no
>> letterboxing.
>>
>> Check your DVD player and make sure it is set to 16:9 and the you TV is
>> set for "full" or whatever it needs to be for proper display.
>> ==================================
>>
>>>Will this ruin the HDTV too or I have to switch to zoom or cinema mode to
>>>have the movie occupy the whole screen. Any recommendation is
>>>appreciated.
>>>
>>> David
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 2:51:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
news:UYC%d.149834$FM3.82325@fed1read02...
> Well Richard, my DVD is always set at 16.9 setting. If I set my TV to
> full mode, it looks funny, the closed caption is half gone and everything
> looks a little elongated, for example, a person's face.
>
> David

From what you say above (DVD player at 16:9 and people are elongated in
Full) it indicates that either you are mistaken that your DVD player is set
for a 16:9 television or the DVD player is malfunctioning. This would not be
an aspect ratio button the the remote, this setting is in the initial main
setup screens for the player which should be accessed without a DVD inserted
to minimize any confusion. Double check those settings and see if it makes a
difference. If not, try another DVD player if you have one around or can
borrow one.
March 21, 2005 3:48:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Richard,

My TV has 4 screen modes : Normal, Cinema, Stretch and Zoom. If watching
analog channels, no bars or letterboxing are showing, except in normal mode
which shows a 4:3 format. But when I watch DVD, normal mode shows the 4:3
format which I don't use, Cinema and stretch modes show the 16:9 format with
letterboxing and zoom mode is the mode that will occupy the whole screen. I
have been using cinema mode which has letterboxing, I don't use stretch mode
becasue it makes someone's face fatter and rounder and zoom mode (I thought
it was full mode) makes someone's face longer and half of the closed caption
disappeared.

David

"Richard C." <post-age@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:423f0a86$0$5893$9a6e19ea@news.newshosting.com...
> --
> X-No-archive: yes
>
> "David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
> news:UYC%d.149834$FM3.82325@fed1read02...
>> Well Richard, my DVD is always set at 16.9 setting. If I set my TV to
>> full mode, it looks funny, the closed caption is half gone and everything
>> looks a little elongated, for example, a person's face.
>>
>> David
>
> ==========================
> Then "full" is not the name used in your menu.
> The point is, that movies come in many aspect ratios and 1.85:1 movies
> should almost fill your screen.
> 2.35:1 movies should have bars top and bottom.
>
> Is that your experience?
> If not, make sure you watch DVD with the same settings that you watch
> HDTV.
> If you use component inputs and have a progressive scan DVD player it
> should lock in that mode automatically.
> ===============================
>>
>> "Richard C." <post-age@spamcop.net> wrote in message
>> news:423e2557$0$5862$9a6e19ea@news.newshosting.com...
>>> --
>>> X-No-archive: yes
>>>
>>> "David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
>>> news:Uen%d.35192$ZE5.22971@fed1read03...
>>>> Hi,
>>>>
>>>> I just purchased a 61in. HDTV monitor. Someone told me that I should
>>>> avoid "burn in", that is to avoid having black sidebars and letter
>>>> boxing. If consistently watch standard-definition (4:3 aspect ratio)
>>>> programming on a wide-screen (16:9 aspect ratio) HD programming with
>>>> sidebars activated over very long periods of time, this may ruin the
>>>> HDTV's ability to display colors evenly across the screen. Similarly,
>>>> constant viewing of 16:9 wide-screen content on a 4:3 aspect ratio HDTV
>>>> with letter boxing can cause the same problem.
>>>>
>>> ======================================
>>> If you adjust your set properly, burn-in should not be a significant
>>> problem.
>>> Usually sets are WAY too high in brightness and contrast out of the box.
>>> ========================================
>>>
>>>> My question is what about watching DVD? All my DVD discs are in wide
>>>> screen format and it always show letter boxing both at the top and
>>>> down.
>>>
>>> =================================
>>> If ALL your DVDs show letterboxing, something is set wrong.
>>> Only about half should be 2.35:1 (which shows bars top and bottom).
>>> The other half should be 1.85:1 and would display virtually no
>>> letterboxing.
>>>
>>> Check your DVD player and make sure it is set to 16:9 and the you TV is
>>> set for "full" or whatever it needs to be for proper display.
>>> ==================================
>>>
>>>>Will this ruin the HDTV too or I have to switch to zoom or cinema mode
>>>>to have the movie occupy the whole screen. Any recommendation is
>>>>appreciated.
>>>>
>>>> David
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
March 21, 2005 3:52:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Charles,

I should have said in "zoom" mode, not "full mode", my TV doesn't have full
mode screen DVDs. Please see my thread to Richard. Thanks for replying
anyway.

David

"Charles Tomaras" <tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote in message
news:D 5Sdnf8JEMAmuKLfRVn-hg@comcast.com...
>
> "David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
> news:UYC%d.149834$FM3.82325@fed1read02...
>> Well Richard, my DVD is always set at 16.9 setting. If I set my TV to
>> full mode, it looks funny, the closed caption is half gone and everything
>> looks a little elongated, for example, a person's face.
>>
>> David
>
> From what you say above (DVD player at 16:9 and people are elongated in
> Full) it indicates that either you are mistaken that your DVD player is
> set for a 16:9 television or the DVD player is malfunctioning. This would
> not be an aspect ratio button the the remote, this setting is in the
> initial main setup screens for the player which should be accessed without
> a DVD inserted to minimize any confusion. Double check those settings and
> see if it makes a difference. If not, try another DVD player if you have
> one around or can borrow one.
>
>
>
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 6:45:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in news:Rlt%d.42887$ZE5.1134@fed1read03:

> Hi all,
>
> Thanks for all the reply. I have the 61" RCA Scenium DLP HD Monitor.
> So, I guess this is not a big issue for me then. Thanks again.

Not even a tiny one!

How is that set for watching SD stuff?

--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667

A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
March 21, 2005 6:45:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hi Dave,

Its not bad when viewing SD programs. I have been shopping for a DLP
projection TV for quite awhile. It came down to the RCA and the Samsung.
Samsung's DLP has been out for awhile, the RCA has a more updated DLP
technology. The store had it side by side for comparision and the Samsung
won my heart.

David

"Dave Oldridge" <doldridg@leavethisoutshaw.ca> wrote in message
news:Xns96204EE7B4BFEdoldridgsprintca@24.71.223.159...
> "David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in news:Rlt%d.42887$ZE5.1134@fed1read03:
>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> Thanks for all the reply. I have the 61" RCA Scenium DLP HD Monitor.
>> So, I guess this is not a big issue for me then. Thanks again.
>
> Not even a tiny one!
>
> How is that set for watching SD stuff?
>
> --
> Dave Oldridge+
> ICQ 1800667
>
> A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
>
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 11:14:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 11:51:32 -0800, "Charles Tomaras"
<tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote:

>
>"David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
>news:UYC%d.149834$FM3.82325@fed1read02...
>> Well Richard, my DVD is always set at 16.9 setting. If I set my TV to
>> full mode, it looks funny, the closed caption is half gone and everything
>> looks a little elongated, for example, a person's face.
>>
>> David
>
>From what you say above (DVD player at 16:9 and people are elongated in
>Full) it indicates that either you are mistaken that your DVD player is set
>for a 16:9 television or the DVD player is malfunctioning.

If I understand correctly the problem is the opposite.
The TV has 16:9 ratio, correct?

If a DVD-player thinks the TV is in 4:3 format it will convert the
signal to display short and wide faces.

If the TV thinks that the incomming 16:9 signal should be displayed
with 4:3 ratio, then you will get tall and thin faces.

I belive "Full" mode usually tells a TV that a signal of another
aspect ratio shall not be displayed with black fields but rather be
zoomed to cover the screen.

Can you tell the TV that the incoming signal should display with 16:9
aspect?
/Jan
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 11:14:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jan B" <nospam@nospam.se> wrote in message news:423f294b.3300533@wingate...
> On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 11:51:32 -0800, "Charles Tomaras"
> <tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote:
>
>>
>>"David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
>>news:UYC%d.149834$FM3.82325@fed1read02...
>>> Well Richard, my DVD is always set at 16.9 setting. If I set my TV to
>>> full mode, it looks funny, the closed caption is half gone and
>>> everything
>>> looks a little elongated, for example, a person's face.
>>>
>>> David
>>
>>From what you say above (DVD player at 16:9 and people are elongated in
>>Full) it indicates that either you are mistaken that your DVD player is
>>set
>>for a 16:9 television or the DVD player is malfunctioning.
>
> If I understand correctly the problem is the opposite.
> The TV has 16:9 ratio, correct?
>
> If a DVD-player thinks the TV is in 4:3 format it will convert the
> signal to display short and wide faces.
>
> If the TV thinks that the incomming 16:9 signal should be displayed
> with 4:3 ratio, then you will get tall and thin faces.
>
> I belive "Full" mode usually tells a TV that a signal of another
> aspect ratio shall not be displayed with black fields but rather be
> zoomed to cover the screen.

Full mode does NOT zoom. Full mode takes the input (which is an
anamorphically squeezed 4:3 shape) and stretches it out on the sides to
edges of the 16:9 set. No zooming at all. Zoom is a feature used to zoom in
on a letterboxed 4:3 image and have it more closely fill the screen
depending on the aspect ratio of the letterboxed image.

Now if the posters DVD player is actually set for a 4:3 television, when he
puts an anamorphically enhanced DVD into it, the player is going to create a
4:3 letterbox which will then be stretched (not zoomed) by the television if
it is in full mode.


>
> Can you tell the TV that the incoming signal should display with 16:9
> aspect?
> /Jan
Anonymous
March 22, 2005 12:13:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message news:roG%d.13$AN1.12@fed1read03...
> Richard,
>
> My TV has 4 screen modes : Normal, Cinema, Stretch and Zoom. If watching
> analog channels, no bars or letterboxing are showing, except in normal
> mode which shows a 4:3 format. But when I watch DVD, normal mode shows
> the 4:3 format which I don't use, Cinema and stretch modes show the 16:9
> format with letterboxing and zoom mode is the mode that will occupy the
> whole screen. I have been using cinema mode which has letterboxing, I
> don't use stretch mode becasue it makes someone's face fatter and rounder
> and zoom mode (I thought it was full mode) makes someone's face longer and
> half of the closed caption disappeared.
>
> David

David, your comments above still tell me that your DVD player is not
properly set for your display. If you have a widescreen 16:9 television your
DVD player must be set for a 16:9 television in it's initial setup menus.
Everything you say tells me it is not.
March 22, 2005 12:51:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Charles,

I checked it over a few times, it is in 16:9 screen format on my DVD. May
be I have a malfuction one. Its a Sony I bought it 3 years ago. Time for a
new one...LOL.

"Charles Tomaras" <tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote in message
news:IZWdnamaSKC6z93fRVn-ig@comcast.com...
>
> "David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
> news:roG%d.13$AN1.12@fed1read03...
>> Richard,
>>
>> My TV has 4 screen modes : Normal, Cinema, Stretch and Zoom. If watching
>> analog channels, no bars or letterboxing are showing, except in normal
>> mode which shows a 4:3 format. But when I watch DVD, normal mode shows
>> the 4:3 format which I don't use, Cinema and stretch modes show the 16:9
>> format with letterboxing and zoom mode is the mode that will occupy the
>> whole screen. I have been using cinema mode which has letterboxing, I
>> don't use stretch mode becasue it makes someone's face fatter and rounder
>> and zoom mode (I thought it was full mode) makes someone's face longer
>> and half of the closed caption disappeared.
>>
>> David
>
> David, your comments above still tell me that your DVD player is not
> properly set for your display. If you have a widescreen 16:9 television
> your DVD player must be set for a 16:9 television in it's initial setup
> menus. Everything you say tells me it is not.
>
Anonymous
March 22, 2005 1:09:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message
news:4UY%d.978$AN1.901@fed1read03...
> Charles,
>
> I checked it over a few times, it is in 16:9 screen format on my DVD. May
> be I have a malfuction one. Its a Sony I bought it 3 years ago. Time for
> a new one...LOL.

Well...at least see if you can borrow another player to eliminate that as a
possibility. But.... I'm still not hearing you use the actual words I want
to hear. In your first sentence above are you saying it is in 16:9 screen
format ON THE SETUP MENUS OF YOUR DVD PLAYER BEFORE YOU EVER PUT A DISC IN
IT? You left the word PLAYER off of that sentence after DVD so I want to
be sure you are talking about the player and not the disc. This is not a
disc issue, it is a player setup issue that affects the output of all
anamorphically enhanced discs you play.
Anonymous
March 22, 2005 10:35:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Mar 2005 09:13:10 -0800, "Charles Tomaras"
<tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote:

>
>"David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote in message news:roG%d.13$AN1.12@fed1read03...
>> Richard,
>>
>> My TV has 4 screen modes : Normal, Cinema, Stretch and Zoom. If watching
>> analog channels, no bars or letterboxing are showing, except in normal
>> mode which shows a 4:3 format. But when I watch DVD, normal mode shows
>> the 4:3 format which I don't use, Cinema and stretch modes show the 16:9
>> format with letterboxing and zoom mode is the mode that will occupy the
>> whole screen. I have been using cinema mode which has letterboxing, I
>> don't use stretch mode becasue it makes someone's face fatter and rounder
>> and zoom mode (I thought it was full mode) makes someone's face longer and
>> half of the closed caption disappeared.
>>
>> David
>
>David, your comments above still tell me that your DVD player is not
>properly set for your display. If you have a widescreen 16:9 television your
>DVD player must be set for a 16:9 television in it's initial setup menus.
>Everything you say tells me it is not.
>

I think the player is set correctly to 16:9, because using (linear)
zoom on a 16:9 disc will then show long faces.

If the DVD-player is wrongly set to 4:3, then using zoom mode on a
16:9 disc the proportions would look correct.

David, from what I understand your description, the correct mode to
use with 16:9 signal would be what the TV calls "Cinema".

Could it be that you only have tested discs with content in wider
format (2.35 etc)?
They are supposed to show the picture in "16:9 letterbox" (with black
bars top and bottom).

If not, check the geometry with a test signal or test-DVD like Digital
Video Essentials.
/Jan
March 24, 2005 1:36:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Mar 2005 09:51:19 -0800, "David" <dy168@cox.net> wrote:

>I checked it over a few times, it is in 16:9 screen format on my DVD. May
>be I have a malfuction one. Its a Sony I bought it 3 years ago. Time for a
>new one...LOL.

Even the oldest DVD players have a setting for 16:9 TVs. I have a very
old Sony and it works fine with my HD TV. The 16:9 setting is in the
"System Setup" menu.

If properly set up, when viewing a DVD on your HDTV with no zoom
settings it will be a 4:3 image with left/right sidebars, but the
image will look squeezed. You must enable "full zoom" mode (whatever
it is called on your HDTV) that stretches the image uniformly (not
"panorama" mode which stretches the sides more than the middle).

In 1.85:1 movies there will be little or no visible letterboxing.
!