Make a laserdisc player a drive?

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Does anyone know how to make a laserdisc player so that, when connected to
an XP machine, it appears as a drive?

What cables do you need, device drivers, etc. Where do you get them?

Can you play your laserdiscs using this connection so the content of the
laserdisc appears on the computer monitor(e.g., Windows Media Player)?

Thanks
5 answers Last reply
More about make laserdisc player drive
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    What you would need is a Video Capture card.Just as if you wish to hook up
    your home DVD player to your system.
    There are quite a few video cards on the market that are capable of this.
    here is a page that lists a few of them
    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/category/category_tlc.asp?CatId=1423

    The Radeon All in wonder do this as well as certain Nvidea Cards
    If you do a google on video capture you will come up with quite a few
    websites that offer detailed instructions
    good luck
    peterk

    --
    It's so much easier to suggest solutions when you don't know too much about
    the problem
    "Robert M. Lincoln" <robert.nospam@americanriver.com> wrote in message
    news:Oq5thZofFHA.2424@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Does anyone know how to make a laserdisc player so that, when connected to
    > an XP machine, it appears as a drive?
    >
    > What cables do you need, device drivers, etc. Where do you get them?
    >
    > Can you play your laserdiscs using this connection so the content of the
    > laserdisc appears on the computer monitor(e.g., Windows Media Player)?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Actually, I want to be able to see the files on the laserdisc. I already
    have a video capture card, and it works fine.

    What I eventually want to do is compress the laserdisc files so I can store
    them on a DVD (and get rid of the bulky laserdiscs). These particular
    laserdiscs have very little motion on the video and should compress to a
    very small size with virtually no loss in video quality.

    So, is there some tool that allows me to see the files on the laserdisc so I
    can copy them to my hard drive?

    Thanks
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    I dont believe such a thing exists...........laserdiscs were not popular
    enough.
    I would suggest trying to capture as you play....Windows Movie Maker might
    work for that.
    Safe the file and then use a DVD burning program like Nero to burn to a DVD
    in a DVD format.
    As I understand the laserdisc format was not a digital format it was an
    analog format that was converted(?)
    http://www.allformp3.com/x-video-converter/
    peterk


    --
    It's so much easier to suggest solutions when you don't know too much about
    the problem
    "Robert M. Lincoln" <robert.nospam@americanriver.com> wrote in message
    news:uPPBD1qfFHA.352@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Actually, I want to be able to see the files on the laserdisc. I already
    > have a video capture card, and it works fine.
    >
    > What I eventually want to do is compress the laserdisc files so I can
    > store them on a DVD (and get rid of the bulky laserdiscs). These
    > particular laserdiscs have very little motion on the video and should
    > compress to a very small size with virtually no loss in video quality.
    >
    > So, is there some tool that allows me to see the files on the laserdisc so
    > I can copy them to my hard drive?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Laserdiscs? Wow. Talk about a trip back to the 1980's! I don't even know
    what kind of file those things would use. I would be astonished if there
    were anything resembling a driver for that piece of hardware. Laserdiscs
    were supposed to be the "killer" hardware device of the era, but the humble
    VHS tape blew everything in the weeds. Thanks to the Adult Film Industry.
    Without them, we would not have VHS tapes, recorders, or players.

    "Robert M. Lincoln" <robert.nospam@americanriver.com> wrote in message
    news:Oq5thZofFHA.2424@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Does anyone know how to make a laserdisc player so that, when connected to
    > an XP machine, it appears as a drive?
    >
    > What cables do you need, device drivers, etc. Where do you get them?
    >
    > Can you play your laserdiscs using this connection so the content of the
    > laserdisc appears on the computer monitor(e.g., Windows Media Player)?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In message <uPPBD1qfFHA.352@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl>, Robert M. Lincoln
    <robert.nospam@americanriver.com> wrote:

    > Actually, I want to be able to see the files on the laserdisc. I already
    > have a video capture card, and it works fine.
    >
    > What I eventually want to do is compress the laserdisc files so I can
    > store
    > them on a DVD (and get rid of the bulky laserdiscs).

    Laserdisc is an analog video format, with analog or digital audio. They do
    not contain files. The (digital) audio from CD Video can be read with a
    CDROM drive.

    There is an LDROM format which supports computer files in addition to analog
    video, and some/many laserdisc players can be computer controlled.

    For more info see:
    http://www.oz.net/blam/LaserDisc/FAQ/FAQ_intro.htm
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laserdisc

    In conclusion, for the video there is no better option than a video capture
    card or equivalent. For the audio S/P-DIF could be used given suitable
    output from the laserdisc player (or Dolby digital demodulator).

    I don't know if the digital audio can be extracted using a LDROM adapter,
    which at a wild guess would probally be a CDROM like SCSI device, which
    would need no special drivers.


    --
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    OpenPGP key fingerprint: D0A6 F403 9745 CED4 6B3B 94CC 8D74 8FC9 9F7F CFE4
    No to software patents! No to DRM/EUCD - hands off our computers!
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