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monitor flickering?

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  • Monitors
  • CRT Monitors
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August 8, 2007 10:48:21 PM

I just noticed that my view sonic A90f+ crt monitor (19inch) monitor is flickering around the edges of the screen. Its kinda hard to explain it. I want to say its kinda like a light vibrating look to it. Is this bad? I have the resolution set at 1152 by 864 and I have it set at the highest hertz which is 75. I thought maybe because the resolution is high I set it back down to 1024 by 768, but the same problem keeps happening. Any ideas? :fou: 

More about : monitor flickering

August 9, 2007 12:03:13 AM

Try lowering the hertz and running it at the native resolution that is probably 1280 x 1024
August 9, 2007 12:38:45 AM

Did you mean 1024 by 768? I tried lowering the hertz but it didn't help. I did put it at this reso and the one u suggested and it didn't help.
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August 9, 2007 11:17:44 AM

Have you updated you video card driver? It's possible that the monitor is heading south? Have you tried it on another machine? How old is it?
a b C Monitor
August 9, 2007 3:39:11 PM

sounds to me like its time for a new screen.

It sucks there are not many good CRT's let on the market. but have a look.
August 10, 2007 8:35:31 PM

g-paw said:
Have you updated you video card driver? It's possible that the monitor is heading south? Have you tried it on another machine? How old is it?


The driver i'm using is tweaks r us. I did installed the latest about 3 months or so. Well now its not flickering anymore. But it maybe because i just turned on my monitor. Well i guess i'll try updating my driver again.
August 10, 2007 8:42:31 PM

g-paw said:
Have you updated you video card driver? It's possible that the monitor is heading south? Have you tried it on another machine? How old is it?


nukemaster said:
sounds to me like its time for a new screen.

It sucks there are not many good CRT's let on the market. but have a look.


Well it's not flickering now. But I just turned it on. Could it be my vid card driver? I'm using tweaks r us xtreme g 160.02 xp 32 bit
August 10, 2007 9:20:50 PM

If this is a nVidia video card, download the most recent driver for the card from the nVidia website rahter than a 3rd party site.
August 10, 2007 10:18:01 PM

If changing the resolution and Hz does not solve the problem, you may be loosing the CRT screen.

My last CRT died when it was about 5 years of age. When the CRT died I had problems with flickering and resizing on 1 edge of the screen and the old TV repairman in the family took one look at the screen and said the tube was going.

I did a quick swap with another screen and confirmed the diagnosis and bought an LCD.

I didnt buy and LCD because I wanted an LCD. I bought an LCD because that was all I could find on the shelf at OD, CC, BB etc.

Good luck finding a CRT replacement.

August 12, 2007 1:54:35 AM

StevieD said:
If changing the resolution and Hz does not solve the problem, you may be loosing the CRT screen.

My last CRT died when it was about 5 years of age. When the CRT died I had problems with flickering and resizing on 1 edge of the screen and the old TV repairman in the family took one look at the screen and said the tube was going.

I did a quick swap with another screen and confirmed the diagnosis and bought an LCD.

I didnt buy and LCD because I wanted an LCD. I bought an LCD because that was all I could find on the shelf at OD, CC, BB etc.

Good luck finding a CRT replacement.


Well I dont want another crt. I'm looking into getting a lcd. CRT are going out. Plus there heavy and too bulky. Thanks for the advice.
August 12, 2007 2:31:59 AM

tvfreak said:
Well I dont want another crt. I'm looking into getting a lcd. CRT are going out. Plus there heavy and too bulky. Thanks for the advice.


Don't diss the CRTs too much. They have much higher resolution for a similar screen size than an LCD and also have a much wider range of color reproduction, and are also more accurate at it to boot. Not to mention that they have a lower refresh time and look good at multiple resolutions, not just one. LCDs' main advantages are that they yield crisper text than a CRT does and have thinner bezels so that a dual-head display is easier to manage. I don't personally give a hoot about depth or weight as my desk is large and sturdy, and the heaviest CRT monitor weighs less than 100 pounds.

If you do want to get an LCD, I have a few recommendations for you:

1. Get a nice one. LCDs have undergone a big price drop in the last year and are very nicely-priced. They also last a long time, so getting a good one is a lasting purchase. I highly suggest that you get no smaller than a 20.1" 1600x1200 (UXGA) model as those are about $300. Alternatively, a 22" 1680x1050 (WSXGA+) or 24" 1920x1200 (WUXGA) model would be excellent if you like widescreens. If you can't afford these, then get a 17" 1280x1024 (SXGA) model. Stay away from the 19" units and the 20" and 20.1" 1400x1050 (SXGA+) models as they have lower resolutions and larger pixels than the other units I've mentioned and you'll likely find yourself thinking that the display is a pile of crap after using a CRT, unless your eyesight is such that you want larger pixels.

2. Avoid analog diplays unless you like fuzziness and headaches. LCDs are natively digital and an analog input looks bad, especially on anything over 1280x1024. Most better smaller (<= 19") LCDs have digital inputs and almost all larger ones do, and this will generally be spelled out as a feature when you look at them.

3. Make sure your graphics card has a DVI output. Most have one, but if yours does not, consider getting a new GPU. It does not have to be expensive- the cheapest GPU will generally look about as good as the most expensive one as a digital signal is a digital signal.

4. Two displays are better than one, and it's best to get ones of an identical size, make, and model if at all possible. I run two 20.1" 1600x1200 units and it is very nice. They are not identical, however, so the Samsung 204B I bought later has a slightly different color pattern than the original Dell 2001FP, which was no longer made when I picked up the Samsung.

By the way, the Samsung 204B is a very good monitor for the money; you would not do badly to pick one up. I paid $290 for it after a $50 MIR in November, so they are very reasonably priced.
August 12, 2007 2:59:13 AM

And LCD produce less heat than CRT's
August 12, 2007 3:38:01 AM

And why are 2 displays so good, what if he is not in front of his computer 24/7 ?
August 12, 2007 4:14:27 AM

MU_Engineer said:
Don't diss the CRTs too much. They have much higher resolution for a similar screen size than an LCD and also have a much wider range of color reproduction, and are also more accurate at it to boot. Not to mention that they have a lower refresh time and look good at multiple resolutions, not just one. LCDs' main advantages are that they yield crisper text than a CRT does and have thinner bezels so that a dual-head display is easier to manage. I don't personally give a hoot about depth or weight as my desk is large and sturdy, and the heaviest CRT monitor weighs less than 100 pounds.

If you do want to get an LCD, I have a few recommendations for you:

1. Get a nice one. LCDs have undergone a big price drop in the last year and are very nicely-priced. They also last a long time, so getting a good one is a lasting purchase. I highly suggest that you get no smaller than a 20.1" 1600x1200 (UXGA) model as those are about $300. Alternatively, a 22" 1680x1050 (WSXGA+) or 24" 1920x1200 (WUXGA) model would be excellent if you like widescreens. If you can't afford these, then get a 17" 1280x1024 (SXGA) model. Stay away from the 19" units and the 20" and 20.1" 1400x1050 (SXGA+) models as they have lower resolutions and larger pixels than the other units I've mentioned and you'll likely find yourself thinking that the display is a pile of crap after using a CRT, unless your eyesight is such that you want larger pixels.

2. Avoid analog diplays unless you like fuzziness and headaches. LCDs are natively digital and an analog input looks bad, especially on anything over 1280x1024. Most better smaller (<= 19") LCDs have digital inputs and almost all larger ones do, and this will generally be spelled out as a feature when you look at them.

3. Make sure your graphics card has a DVI output. Most have one, but if yours does not, consider getting a new GPU. It does not have to be expensive- the cheapest GPU will generally look about as good as the most expensive one as a digital signal is a digital signal.

4. Two displays are better than one, and it's best to get ones of an identical size, make, and model if at all possible. I run two 20.1" 1600x1200 units and it is very nice. They are not identical, however, so the Samsung 204B I bought later has a slightly different color pattern than the original Dell 2001FP, which was no longer made when I picked up the Samsung.

By the way, the Samsung 204B is a very good monitor for the money; you would not do badly to pick one up. I paid $290 for it after a $50 MIR in November, so they are very reasonably priced.


Damn thanks for the tip. I am looking into getting a LCD monitor. I'm looking into getting a 22 or 24. I like to watch movies and play games like CS. So I want a LCD monitor that can handle fast motion so, I will need a monitor with fast refresh rate. My buddy bought a samsung 22 that has 2 or 5 ms and 2000 contrast ratio. I know that some has hdmi out put on them as well. I also would like if the monitor has usb as well. I know some models come with usb output. Any suggestions on some good LCD models?
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