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UPS' To The Rescue

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August 16, 2007 11:16:39 AM

http://www.tomshardware.com/2007/08/16/ups_to_the_rescue/index.html

Uninterruptible power supplies (UPS') are essential items to boost uptime and data protection. But how do they work? We looked at three affordable entry-level models from APC, Belkin and Eaton/Powerware.

More about : ups rescue

August 16, 2007 12:20:32 PM

Why do I need a UPS?
Normally, computers can tolerate slight changes in power. But large changes could cause the computer's power supply to fail. A UPS protects your computer and work against three main power problems:
Voltage surges and spikes – These are caused by lightning or other devices in the facility. The result is a sudden increase in voltage that could seriously damage computers and electronic equipment. Such events have been found to occur up to 600 times every year.
Voltage sags – These are caused by excessive demand on the utility which causes the power level to drop.
Total power failure – The most dramatic power event results in a complete power outage. Studies reveal this happens 7-14 times every year.

These problems have short and long-term consequences. In the short term, you could face loss of critical data, interrupted transactions and stress to your hardware that could lead to premature failure.

In the long run, you could face a backlog of work, loss of productivity, deterioration of customer service, interruption to critical processes, loss of transactional data, loss of market share, damage to your company’s reputation, missed deadlines, damage to equipment and frustration.

SUGGESTED BRAND BETTER THAN ABOVE MENTIONED:
http://www.ablerex-ups.com.sg
(cheaper with bunch of features including longer backup time)
August 16, 2007 1:16:37 PM

Why wasn't the TrippLite SU1000XLa mentioned?
This system is in the same ratings & price of the others & covers all electrical anomalies at a delivered 800 watts, $250,000 insurance on anything protected by it, and you get standard electrical sockets in the back so no strange cables to dig up or buy. (a no brainer :pt1cable:  ) There's even a place to plug in additional battery for added runtime! So, it was ignored from the review why? Because it blows the competition out of the water. Techs who know, use TrippLite.

www.tripplite.com/products/product.cfm?productID=3180

Quick review:
- Uses double conversion, conditions incoming current for ideal power to your electronics within 2% of the ideal 120VAC during over & under voltages, 3-6 year battery life.
Related resources
August 16, 2007 2:22:05 PM

muk said:
http://www.tomshardware.com/2007/08/16/ups_to_the_rescue/index.html

Uninterruptible power supplies (UPS') are essential items to boost uptime and data protection. But how do they work? We looked at three affordable entry-level models from APC, Belkin and Eaton/Powerware.


pogsnet said:
Why do I need a UPS?
Normally, computers can tolerate slight changes in power. But large changes could cause the computer's power supply to fail. A UPS protects your computer and work against three main power problems:
Voltage surges and spikes – These are caused by lightning or other devices in the facility. The result is a sudden increase in voltage that could seriously damage computers and electronic equipment. Such events have been found to occur up to 600 times every year.
Voltage sags – These are caused by excessive demand on the utility which causes the power level to drop.
Total power failure – The most dramatic power event results in a complete power outage. Studies reveal this happens 7-14 times every year.

These problems have short and long-term consequences. In the short term, you could face loss of critical data, interrupted transactions and stress to your hardware that could lead to premature failure.

In the long run, you could face a backlog of work, loss of productivity, deterioration of customer service, interruption to critical processes, loss of transactional data, loss of market share, damage to your company’s reputation, missed deadlines, damage to equipment and frustration.

SUGGESTED BRAND BETTER THAN ABOVE MENTIONED:
http://www.ablerex-ups.com.sg
(cheaper with bunch of features including longer backup time)



OMG- I didn't know that FanBoi Syndrome extended to UPS'! What's next- keyboard FanBoi's?
August 16, 2007 2:27:59 PM

PokeyJoe said:
...and you get standard electrical sockets in the back so no strange cables to dig up or buy. (a no brainer :pt1cable:  )


WTH are you talking about?
August 16, 2007 2:52:43 PM

Beware Belkin software under Windows XP. In my experience, the Bulldog software crashes and gives an error message on every login as a non-admin. When I push the sleep button to shut down, the system goes into sleep and immediately resumes, seemingly just to tell me that the communication with the UPS has been lost! If on resume you quickly push the sleep key again, it usually does sleep. Also, I have had cases where the computer won't enter sleep mode based on the time set in "Power Management". This part has been difficult to isolate because it seems so random as to whether it will or won't kick in. Belkin Tech support has told me they are aware of all these issues, but they have no fixes available. This from software to be run on a 6 year old OS! I mean, if they had such issues on Vista, I might give them a pass for a while, but XP?? :fou:  Worse, I cannot just uninstall the Bulldog software and use XP's built-in UPS functionality like I can on my other computer with its APC UPS.

Really, I say you should save yourself the frustration and buy yourself a good APC UPS, preferably on sale.
a b B Homebuilt system
a c 121 ) Power supply
August 16, 2007 3:26:39 PM

For a variety of reasons, Belkin is on my "do not buy" list. Anything Belkin I ever bought (stopped a few years ago) was defective, quickly became defective, or simply didn't meet reasonable expectations.
For UPS units, I've used TrippLite and APC and been satisfied with both.
August 16, 2007 3:33:55 PM

Quote:
As our test system consumed approximately 142 W, you can easily calculate the run time at maximum load by dividing our results by 4.2, which is because 600 W is 4.2 times more than our 142 W load.
WRONG.
Obviously you haven't been using UPS's very much nor do you understand characteristics of UPS design.

Several factors affect runtime across the full load range. *** IT IS NOT LINEAR ***

Look at the APC runtime charts. eg.
http://www.apc.com/products/runtime_for_extendedruntime...

UPS typical use a sealed lead-acid battery (SLA). High current means bigger battery voltage drop and shorter runtime than expected at high load. EG. The APC model is rated for 7mins at 600w load and 20mins@300w, .5 load = almost 3x runtime. It doesn't continue at that rate so .25 load is a fraction over 6x full load runtime.

The capacity is not lost it's just not useable until the load is reduced. System aims for max 80% discharge for deep cycle batteries. Temperature will effect apparent voltage and capacity.

Total battery load = Static/min load of inverter + load/efficiency
runtime = available capacity@load / total battery load
runtime mins = (Ah * V / W) * 60

SLA batteries rated for 20Hr charge and recharge rates (calculate Ah Capacity).
UPS optimum at 1hr use. Select UPS based on 2x current load (ie. use 50% max rated load).

In three years of typical use the batteries may only support the load for < half of the original time. Good to have some capacity in reserve for new/additional hardware. Typically starts shutdown several minutes before the batteries are expected to runout (cannot support the load).

Even if the UPS doesn't use a fan, transformer and electronics may still produce audible hum (as my old APC SUA1000i does at home).
August 16, 2007 4:12:08 PM

I will only buy TrippLite power products, I'm suprised that wasn't reviewed. APC is arguably the WORST choice for UPS solutions in terms of it being a robust product.

Seemed like almost everytime my company lost power, I had to replace the battery in the APC unit because it would be dead. Plus alot of the units make this annoying beeping noise until you replace it as if the big red light next to replace battery wasn't enough?? I hate you APC :p 
August 16, 2007 4:32:12 PM

You take your gaming seriously. Whether it's the exhilaration of high adventure or the thrill of fast-paced action, the virtual world is an experience like no others, where you roam or dominate.

With Blade, your precious leisure time won't be interrupted by an unstable or unreliable power. Protect those crucial gaming moments with some serious power.

ABLEREX BLADE UPS
*Increase the performance of your console by up to 90%
*Prevent halts or system crashes
*Ensure 100% connectivity to power
*Guards your Consoles & PC against short circuit and sudden surges
August 16, 2007 4:35:16 PM

APC sucks... I agree @ jmchristy. The battery life is too short. Don't buy that one, not worth it.
August 16, 2007 6:38:57 PM

Cyberpower CP series with AVR seem to be good bargains.
August 16, 2007 6:44:17 PM

I haven't had good luck with TrippLite so far, though that has been for DC-AC inverters rather then for UPSs. Something about how they convert the power just screws up a good portion of our instrumetation.

As for why they have compared these 3 specific UPSs, its very simple. These are the companies that sent them product to test.

Right now I'm using a Belkin UPS and it has been working fine for me. Its not that old yet, so we'll see how it lasts with time. I never expected it to support my system for continued use, just long enough to shut things down right. The 3 times I needed it to work last weekend it worked without any problems.
August 16, 2007 7:39:49 PM

pogsnet said:
APC sucks... I agree @ jmchristy. The battery life is too short. Don't buy that one, not worth it.


Just for a different point of view, the first battery on my APC lasted 6 years, and the second has worked fine for the past 3 years. Maybe I got a larger model or something, but I've been pleased with the performance. I didn't like the one Belkin I bought. It failed quickly.
August 16, 2007 8:16:14 PM

APC does have some nicer high end UPS's there a matrix 5000 UPS and we recently had a lightning strike and blow the fuse on a transformer located on a pole on our property. I had purchased the APC matrix 5000 on ebay for a quick low-cost corporate backup solution, it does require a 220 3 phase 50 Amp power supply but the thing kept up the corporate phone systems and with it's 5 powered components including an Adtran 650 T1 Circuit for 4 hours (with plenty of time to spare), this along a 900 Watt Server, it's monitor & KVM (which was shut down manually after 30 minutes) So APC does do a decent job with their high end UPS's but for mainstream home/small office, they don't provide high end technology scalled down for the masses.
August 16, 2007 8:17:26 PM

Just so the APC haters are aware, I have worked in 6 hospitals, and they are all that they have trusted.

Trust me...20 years of trial and error with $2 million lab analyzers, multi million dollar MRI/CT consoles, and the like says more than your $1000 computers...
August 16, 2007 8:29:54 PM

NewbieTechGodII said:
WTH are you talking about?


Did you not see the UPS back images in the review?
I am talking about the wierd dongles needed for those UPS sockets that look like a revese PC PSU socket.
None of the reviewed UPS's include enough dongle plugs to fill all the holes in the back of their own UPS's...

TrippLite UPS's have standard 3-prong wall plugs sockets, and gereally speaking, most people have at least 1 network device that doen't use a PC PSU style plug. Can you say Cable/DSL Modem? Wireless Router anyone?
August 16, 2007 8:39:44 PM

This is off of the fanboy ranting going on. My complaint is with this article is the testing that was done.

The main test of a UPS is how well does it keep my computer up when all around it the power is going nuts. The issue in my mind, however, is not so much "on or off?" but brownouts, oversupplies, glitches, noise, and all that other crud.

Many of us are blessed with good, stable power. However, others are not so lucky. Even here in the good old U S of A, if you live in a rural area, your power may end up looking like a graph of last weeks stock market prices.

I would have liked to see Tom's actually *test* these UPS's the way that y'all nail everything else. What's the lowest voltage before the UPS kicks in? If it's settable, does the UPS actually kick in when you tell it? How about over-voltage? When someone drops a nice inductive load on the line can the UPS take the weird supply variations?

Granted, your basic entry-level standby UPS will probably not deal well with power drop outs, but at least *measure* it! If you're testing a line interactive UPS, does it meet the specs?

All you've told me is that you got three UPS units in the mail, you plugged 'em in, charged 'em up, then cut off the power to see which one died first.

Sorry, Tom's. This article is, in my book, not a keeper.

Stu
----
Cheap. Fast. Good. Choose Two.
August 16, 2007 8:49:04 PM

This "review" as it were isn't. You tested runtime based on some random system drawing 142W. OK, great. Not a review.

You didn't even bother to include a simple efficiency graph. For example, you have the 3 UPS systems, 5Ah, 7Ah, and 9Ah. Based on you proposed linear model, if 5Ah = 17min, then 9Ah = 30.6min. Yet, 9Ah yielded 41 minutes! Conclusion: The APC is more efficient than the Belkin. That is, it has what could be described best as a lower internal resistance. Of course, this might change if you were instead using 75W instead of 142W, or perhaps gaming at 400W when the power died.

Next up, the big difference between UPS systems of the same class (Ah rating, runtime) is the power quality. You would need to have an oscilloscope to test the amount that the power output signal deviates from the theoretical sine wave, compared - of course - with the AC line. Also, you would need the UPS power output signal quality when the system is plugged in and not running off battery, to ensure that it at the least does not do harm to the quality.

Mr. Schmidt has, again, missed very key points in what appears to be a simple review. Instead, offers us 17 pages of pointless marketing drab. The only conclusion one can draw from his review is that you need more Ah, and APC offers them.

Someone please fire this clown.

August 16, 2007 9:39:04 PM

What I would be very interested in is the Noise rating on these UPS's. I have a quiet water-cooled PC and adding a UPS with a high pitched fan that whines loudly every time it spins up is extremely irritating and defeats the purpose of getting a silent PC.
August 16, 2007 10:32:53 PM

jmchristy said:
You take your gaming seriously. Whether it's the exhilaration of high adventure or the thrill of fast-paced action, the virtual world is an experience like no others, where you roam or dominate.

With Blade, your precious leisure time won't be interrupted by an unstable or unreliable power. Protect those crucial gaming moments with some serious power.

ABLEREX BLADE UPS
*Increase the performance of your console by up to 90%
*Prevent halts or system crashes
*Ensure 100% connectivity to power
*Guards your Consoles & PC against short circuit and sudden surges



So, I buy one of these Ablerex UPS 's and the performance of my system increases by 90%, prevents my system crashing, Ensure's 100 Connectivity to power and prevents any type of short circuit in my system.

I know a few people who would be interested in these UPS's

AMD - they could use the performance boost atm, although I guess Intel could strike back with an Ablerex Quad core bundle......
Microsoft, if they throw one in with every copy of Vista, bingo, no more crashes... they will be onto a winner!!!!

I think you are an employee of this company with some nice market spin, somewhat unrealistic but amusing all the same, thanks for brightening up the day.

As a side note, I have not come across a UPS without surge protection.


Edit* Not sure what happened when I quoted this message but it quoted the wrong person, I edited the quote but it still says it's quoting the wrong person... *shrug*
August 16, 2007 10:42:35 PM

I personally own three CyberPower UPS systems and been very happy with them. The oldest UPS I replaced two batteries and gave it to a friend of mine before moving to California (too heavy to be shipped or moved). My main system is using the CyberPower AVR 1500 and love it's durablity. I've had this thing for almost 5 years and still with the original batteries. Of course, I recently did a test and still have some juice left in it. I will soon have to order replacement batteries which I can get anywhere.

APC is nice but CyberPower works for me.

Darkk
a b B Homebuilt system
a c 79 ) Power supply
August 16, 2007 11:40:38 PM

pogsnet said:
You take your gaming seriously. Whether it's the exhilaration of high adventure or the thrill of fast-paced action, the virtual world is an experience like no others, where you roam or dominate.

With Blade, your precious leisure time won't be interrupted by an unstable or unreliable power. Protect those crucial gaming moments with some serious power.

ABLEREX BLADE UPS
*Increase the performance of your console by up to 90%
*Prevent halts or system crashes
*Ensure 100% connectivity to power
*Guards your Consoles & PC against short circuit and sudden surges

Stop quoting that site.
Sorry no ups makes your consoles faster....WTF

@ the normal plug comment....those may be what 230/240 volt plugs look like?

my apc keep me happy....why? cause once i installed it the power stopped f'in up :)  even in storms....it only got to run when i unplugged it to route the cables :) 

Also on the APC comment...i have NEVER seen a ups in a business that was not APC(one reason why i decide to get it and it was cheap cause of last years model. i do wish i had the expandable[the bx1500 has the option but not the 1200 :(  ] batteries cause those last LONGGG)
August 17, 2007 12:34:35 AM

Actually, the UPS can increase Console performance by infinite amounts. The fact he only claims 90% is quite odd.

It's most about when it increases performance.
I find my System runs @ 3.0Ghz when my house has power.
0 Ghz when no power and no ups but 3.0Gzh when no power and ups.

0->3.0Ghz is an infinite increase.
Not really sure how to get a 90% increase from 0.0Ghz.
August 17, 2007 12:57:39 AM

ABLEREX is the official ups of the first world cyber olympics no other UPS.

Ablerex to power non-stop high intensity Gameplay at WCG 2006

Press Release - Ablerex Premieres UPS for Gamers At WCG 2005 Singapore Championship

a b B Homebuilt system
a c 79 ) Power supply
August 17, 2007 4:59:53 AM

joex444 said:
OK, I see a couple comments about the plug issue.

They are NOT 230v plugs -- those still have 3 prongs.

You need a PC power extension cable to use them.

Google: http://www.datapro.net/products/pc-power-extension-cord...

Also, if you want to run a router or standard 120v 3 prong device: http://www.datapro.net/products/pc-power-adaptor-wall-t...

Wha t does 3 prongs have to do with it?

thats a 230 volt plug with 3 prongs :p 

I did not think anyone still used those for computer, old ibm's did that. power to psu, psu to screen(with that kind of plug)
a b ) Power supply
August 17, 2007 6:47:27 AM

I have an APC Back-ups ES 500 that is 5 years and still on the original battery. It only gives me about 10 minutes of runtime, but I did not buy it to keep my computer running for hours, just long enough to save what I am doing and shut down my computer safely.

Casey
August 17, 2007 11:43:26 AM

Eaglesfan...
Maybe it was my supplier, I don't know. All I know is, I've had several (80-100) APC UPS 1500VA/1000VA units and about 90% of them the battery died with 1 or 2 uses. I also had certified electrical tech's check my electrical lines to make sure there wasn't anything going on there that would be causing these things to die. I didn't really want to have to replace all my APC units.....and these aren't the higher end models that you are praising, but still these are $300 - $500 units. Not to mention the circuitry inside these systems looks like I could go to RadioShack and get the same material for $1.35.

The poor performance of those APC units led me to switch to Tripp Lite across the board. I have several racks of Tripp Lite SU10000RT3U2TF's with external battery packs and PDU's. These have performed great, and the software to control these units remotely works wonderfully. I have also bought several smaller Tripp Lite units and replaced the failing APC units and it's been a year, several power outages....and I haven't replaced a single one.

Some of the APC's were also being used in a manufacturing environment, hooked up to PC's that are next to million dollar metal stamping presses. They just couldn't hold up to the challenge, maybe if they sat in air conditioning 24/7 in a nice, quiet environment they would fair better :) 
August 20, 2007 8:28:47 AM

Waste of time. :( 
It makes little if any sense to "test" UPSs without specifying the PC Power Supply used in the test (if it has APFC, passive PFC or no PFC). Total power consumption depends on the UPS type (line interactive, backup, etc.) AND the PFC type. More importantly, backup time will also be affected by the UPS type AND the PFC type. Some combinations perform worse than you get under "normal" conditions.
August 20, 2007 9:39:12 AM

PokeyJoe said:
Did you not see the UPS back images in the review?
I am talking about the wierd dongles needed for those UPS sockets that look like a revese PC PSU socket.
None of the reviewed UPS's include enough dongle plugs to fill all the holes in the back of their own UPS's...

TrippLite UPS's have standard 3-prong wall plugs sockets, and gereally speaking, most people have at least 1 network device that doen't use a PC PSU style plug. Can you say Cable/DSL Modem? Wireless Router anyone?


I absolutely agree to that. While I am quite satisfied with my APC I was pretty angry when I discovered that not even the comp store that sold me that thing would provide adapters for it. I had to build one of my own...
August 20, 2007 10:27:07 PM



Funny, US domestic units all have standard US style plug sockets, all the international units (including Tripplite) have standard IEC320 - C13's, not sure where you live but the C13 is the standard computer connector for just about the entire planet (USA excepted of course, although this is changing fast), most business class computing equipment has C13/C14 connectors, these are not really designed for home use but a small business arena.

International
http://www.tripplite.com/products/product.cfm?productID...
http://www.apc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?...

US Domestic
http://www.tripplite.com/products/product.cfm?productID...
http://www.apc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?...


If you look on the rear of the Eaton UPS it clearly states what voltages it is aimed at, 220/230/240, which makes it an international UPS as well hence the C13 connectors.

At the end of the day it's a battery in a box, if it works for you, all well and good.
August 20, 2007 10:48:00 PM

Errrmm....you just proved us right there. These are the OPPOSITE connectors from what you would need... And there are NOT enough cables shipped at least by APC. So what dou you think one should do if you want to connect your switch/modem/router as well, huh?
August 20, 2007 11:08:11 PM

My business has dozens of APC units scattered throughout the business to support critical computers. These are nothing fancy, basic 300-500w units sold for home or small business usage, typically $100 or so.

Most of the units are 5-6 years old. A couple units may even be 8 years old. A couple of the APC units are in the warehouse or shipping buildings where ambient temperatures routinely hit 110F for 3-4 months of the year.

We located on the Gulf of Mexico and due to our proximity to the coast line we have daily thunderstorms during the spring and summer months, with frequent power outages ... sometimes a dozen or more outages per year. So the units really do get used.

We have never had to replace an APC unit. While I can not estimate how effecient the batteries remain, there is no doubt that the battery units are holding a charge sufficient to shut down a computer after a power failure.

As stated, APC is nothing more than a battery in a box. Fortunately the battery works. That is all we expect the units to do, and they perform as expected.
August 21, 2007 1:44:07 AM

aziraphale said:
Errrmm....you just proved us right there. These are the OPPOSITE connectors from what you would need... And there are NOT enough cables shipped at least by APC. So what dou you think one should do if you want to connect your switch/modem/router as well, huh?



What are you talking about? C14 out of the UPS goes to C13 on the computer.

Cisco switches SHIP with C14/C13 connectors. Cisco Routers, C14/C13.

If you want a unit with 3 prong plugs get a unit designed for home use, all the UPS's reviewed are business class UPS's (although lower end ones).


August 24, 2007 2:37:12 PM

jstall said:
What are you talking about? C14 out of the UPS goes to C13 on the computer.

Cisco switches SHIP with C14/C13 connectors. Cisco Routers, C14/C13.

If you want a unit with 3 prong plugs get a unit designed for home use, all the UPS's reviewed are business class UPS's (although lower end ones).



Let me clarify this for you, this review is targeting overclockers, not electricians, although these UPS's are for paranoid small businesses (explained later) or a very specialized group which would make them anti-mainstream items. These people "Overclockers" deal with small voltage DC only. Their only AC concern is that they have 110AC power that their PSU's standard NEMA 5-15R household can plug into, and it gets as clean & constant power available, and doesn't require them to even open the fuse box. "Overclockers" don't want to have to rewire their homes/apartments for 440 3-phase with a 500Amp transformer on a cement pad in the back yard with a transformer humming in the basement to give 188v to some Russian designed do-hickey then and change wall sockets to accommodate European equipment according to the Chinese instructions some UPS came with.

Get the point?

The only business reason to buy a "mainstream" 600/700W UPS that only has C14/C13 outlets is to keep employees from pluging their fans, lamps, & space heaters into it. If the employees don't have access to the UPS, it should have NEMA 5-15 outlets. Even our various 7' rack PDU's (power distribution units) provide NEMA 5-15 outlets. So, you need to stop and ask yourself, "why would I want to use the "special" power cable the UPS supplied and not the one my equipment came with & what if the UPS's special C13/C14 cable is too short to get around my desk?" Making a UPS with only C13/C14 plugs is assonine and an attempt to nickle-and-dime the end users for overpriced accessories.

Summary: We want common US power outlets for our common US consumer products. Thanks.
August 24, 2007 3:19:27 PM

I'm looking for a UPS and probably the most important thing to me is how soon it kicks in. I live in the country so I get frequent power dips. Although runtime is important, voltage drops occur more often. I know that none of them probably kick in when the volgate goes to 109V but whats the best one out there.

Also, it seems I remember reading somewhere a while back that there are two types of ups. One kicks in the battery only when the power droops. The other runs off the battery to allow constant voltage while constantly recharging (similar to the way a car works.) the problem is i can't remember what the name of the latter was. If any one knows, please inform me. UPS knowledge is not my forte. (hopefully it soon will be)
August 24, 2007 3:48:40 PM

jedi940 said:
I'm looking for a UPS and probably the most important thing to me is how soon it kicks in. I live in the country so I get frequent power dips. Although runtime is important, voltage drops occur more often. I know that none of them probably kick in when the volgate goes to 109V but whats the best one out there.

Also, it seems I remember reading somewhere a while back that there are two types of ups. One kicks in the battery only when the power droops. The other runs off the battery to allow constant voltage while constantly recharging (similar to the way a car works.) the problem is i can't remember what the name of the latter was. If any one knows, please inform me. UPS knowledge is not my forte. (hopefully it soon will be)


Save yourself a lot of agonizing, time for the UPS to switch between wall power and battery is a mute point, and has been for over a decade.

Your only concerns should be wall AC power conditioning, runtime, and usablity (sockets/software). TrippLite products are my recomendation, the link above is in line with the products in the review but at a much higher quality, and warranty.
August 24, 2007 4:38:18 PM

I thought that there were differences between ups as far as when they would kick in. I would rather have one kick in at 100V then wait until it got to 85V or so. The goal is to have the most steady stream of power running to my computer as possible.

Also, are there UPS's that always run off the battery and constantly charge? I would prefer this as it would provide the most steady stream of power.
August 27, 2007 3:25:08 AM

jedi940 said:
I thought that there were differences between ups as far as when they would kick in. I would rather have one kick in at 100V then wait until it got to 85V or so. The goal is to have the most steady stream of power running to my computer as possible.

Also, are there UPS's that always run off the battery and constantly charge? I would prefer this as it would provide the most steady stream of power.


There are differences, some UPS will kick in at wider ranges depending on what you want from the voltages your quoting I am assuming you are in the USA (I cannot see a 240V UPS having that wide a range) some can even be set by the user using the supplied software (not to sure if the reviewed UPS have that ability) if that is a requirement you could always check with the manufacturer first.

Online UPS's are also available, although they are usually more expensive, I think all of the manufacturers reviewed have online UPS models available as well as a lot of other manufacturers (it does seem a rather narrow range of UPS's were tested) most power supplies would have no problem with the transfer time on your average UPS although if you really want it you could pay the extra.
August 28, 2007 10:31:51 AM

PokeyJoe said:
Let me clarify this for you, this review is targeting overclockers, not electricians, although these UPS's are for paranoid small businesses (explained later) or a very specialized group which would make them anti-mainstream items. These people "Overclockers" deal with small voltage DC only. Their only AC concern is that they have 110AC power that their PSU's standard NEMA 5-15R household can plug into, and it gets as clean & constant power available, and doesn't require them to even open the fuse box. "Overclockers" don't want to have to rewire their homes/apartments for 440 3-phase with a 500Amp transformer on a cement pad in the back yard with a transformer humming in the basement to give 188v to some Russian designed do-hickey then and change wall sockets to accommodate European equipment according to the Chinese instructions some UPS came with.

Get the point?

The only business reason to buy a "mainstream" 600/700W UPS that only has C14/C13 outlets is to keep employees from pluging their fans, lamps, & space heaters into it. If the employees don't have access to the UPS, it should have NEMA 5-15 outlets. Even our various 7' rack PDU's (power distribution units) provide NEMA 5-15 outlets. So, you need to stop and ask yourself, "why would I want to use the "special" power cable the UPS supplied and not the one my equipment came with & what if the UPS's special C13/C14 cable is too short to get around my desk?" Making a UPS with only C13/C14 plugs is assonine and an attempt to nickle-and-dime the end users for overpriced accessories.

Summary: We want common US power outlets for our common US consumer products. Thanks.




Maybe you should have checked the link to the USA variants of the PRODUCT. The products reviewed WERE NOT MADE for the US Market, why did the reviewers use UK/Euro models.. hmm, no idea... oh wait.. maybe they live there.

Every single manufacturer reviewed has a variant of the tested UPS made for the US market (with the appropriate connections on the back.... gasp!!!!). Maybe you should look at the UPS that is aimed at your market instead of having to 'rewire your house' although you seem smart enough to actually do that rather than sit down and figure out why they would have non-US connections on them, maybe people should take that into account when they look at your recommendations as to what to buy.

Get the point or would you like me to post some pictures in crayon that you might be able to understand????

Summary... Not everyone lives in the bloody USA and were happy to see C14/13 connectors.
October 12, 2007 12:11:30 AM

Hi

I would like to add that I am big Fan Boi of Belkin UPS units. They are the right price in the UK (you pay like 2x the dosh for an 1200VA APC vs a Belkin 1200VA UPS). I have 3x 1200VA Belkin units and the software works well with XP and XP 64bit. I can schedule deep battery cycles every month. I can change the transfer voltage to switch from AC to battery backup (actually in the software utility). Plus a whole bunch of other stuff...

All 3 units do still work fine years (varys from ~1-4 years) after I bought them on the original battery. They all have standard UK plug sockets on the back thankfully!! If the power fails the units easily give enough power to keep my kit going long enough to shut down. They also pass the old "pull out the plug test" :-)... They are very quiet as well.

OK I could get an 1500AV APC unit but I would probably have to be hospitalised if they are any heaver than the 1200VA Belkin units!!

Can't comment on the Belkin US models of course...


Just my $0.02 worth....

Bob Wya
October 12, 2007 12:42:40 AM

jmchristy said:
I will only buy TrippLite power products, I'm suprised that wasn't reviewed. APC is arguably the WORST choice for UPS solutions in terms of it being a robust product.

Seemed like almost everytime my company lost power, I had to replace the battery in the APC unit because it would be dead. Plus alot of the units make this annoying beeping noise until you replace it as if the big red light next to replace battery wasn't enough?? I hate you APC :p 


Ugh... everything this guy said sounds ALL TOO FAMILIAR. APCs at work lose their batteries with an alarming frequency. Also, some models seem to lack the ability to silence audible alarms... we have crappy power in this county that goes up and down... I don't need a damned beep to let me know that REPEATEDLY. Fed up with their crap I have "field engineered" several units for silent operation (I opened them up and physically destroyed the speaker)
October 12, 2007 2:38:39 AM

Just to add my experience,
Have used APC, IBM, and Cyberpower. The APC was good for a year or two til the battery is weak. The IBM had a garbage battery from the start. The Cyberpower AVR model is only 6 months old but has been great. You can get good deals on them too. Peace.
October 12, 2007 2:43:37 PM

I'm using an Ultra ULT33046 (http://www.ultraproducts.com/product_details.php?cPath=...) to provide safe power to an HTPC and a 46" LCD TV, plus power and/or surge protection to various other components. It works ok, but seems to suffer the same "admin only" problem described for the Belkin software above.

I'm guessing it's just a re-branded product made by someone else. Anyone have any opinions on it / Ultra relative to APC, Belkin, Tripplite, Cyberpower and the third Mfr mentioned in the article? It's saved me through a dozen outages this year so far.
October 12, 2007 4:18:10 PM

We use the APC smart-UPS and have for some time, with no problem at all, I might add. Very quiet, efficient, and intercepts the myriad of power brown outs we experience here.
October 12, 2007 4:25:51 PM

I use an APC 1400, which I got for free, but yet had to buy new batteries for.

I've had mine for about 6-7 years, and spent $111 bucks for new batteries. :lol: 

I think its worth it.

About the run time. My linux is now my older PC. (P4 3.0 - 6800 AGP - 450W Cheetah) On a full charge, it will run about 20mins then start beeping. My new system with the 8800 GTS 320mb cuts that time to 11 mins, and starts beeping. :lol:  . o O (o'well)

Edit:

I must add that I also run my 22" LCD, 15" LCD, Stereo, Router, and some other stuff. :D 
a b B Homebuilt system
a c 79 ) Power supply
October 13, 2007 3:44:29 AM

hey as long as it lasts long enough to save and shut down/hibernate. Its all good
!