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Alienware vs. home build question

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August 16, 2007 12:21:53 PM

Ok, I need to buy a new computer....75% for gaming, 25% for work. I do not have the expertise to build my own at this point. I am looking at an Alienware model...though everyone on these forums seems to bust on Alienware due to price, reputation, and really the fact thats its not a home build. Please humor me on this.....I listed the specs below that I am considering....total price is $2,449 with shipping. My obvious questions are:

1. How much profit is Alienware truly building into this price, or roughly how much would an identical home build rig cost?

2. Will the NVIDIA nForce 680i SLI Motherboard support the future 45nm Penryn if I wanted to upgrade myself?

3. Can the Intel® Core™ 2 Duo E6850 support 4 gigs of RAM?


1] Area-51® 7500

Chassis: Alienware® P2 Chassis with 700 Watt Power Supply - Saucer Silver
Chassis Customization : AlienFX™ System Lighting is not available with the Alienware P2 Chassis with 700 Watt Power Supply.
High-Performance Liquid Cooling: Alienware® Standard System Cooling
Graphics Processor: Single Graphics Processors - 768MB NVIDIA® GeForce™ 8800 GTX
Processor: Intel® Core™ 2 Duo E6850 3.0GHz 4MB Cache 1333MHz FSB
Memory: High-Performance 800MHz DDR2 SDRAM - 2GB - 2 x 1024MB
Motherboard: Alienware® Approved NVIDIA nForce 680i SLI Motherboard
Operating System (Office software not included): Genuine Windows Vista™ Home Premium
Desktop Tuners and Remotes: Without Media Center Remote Control or TV Tuner
System Drive: Single Drive Configuration - 250GB Serial ATA 3Gb/s 7,200 RPM w/ 8MB Cache
Primary CD ROM/DVD ROM: 20X Dual Layer DVD±RW/CD-RW Burner w/ LightScribe Technology - View Demo
Secondary CD ROM/DVD ROM: 20X Dual Layer DVD±RW/CD-RW Burner
Sound Card: High-Definition 7.1 Performance Audio
Monitor: No Monitor
Keyboard: Alienware® USB Full-Size Keyboard
Mouse : Alienware® Optical 3-Button Mouse with Scroll Wheel
Warranty: 1-Year AlienCare Toll-Free 24/7 Phone Support w/ Onsite Service
Alienware Extras: Alienware® Mesh Cap
Alienware Extras: Alienware® Mousepad
Alienware Extras: AlienInspection - Exclusive Integration and Inspection - $100 Value - FREE!
Alienware Extras: AlienWiring - Exclusive Internal Wire Management - $100 Value - FREE!

Your comments are greatly appreciated, and please forgive my simple questions!

August 16, 2007 12:56:21 PM

I do not know the profit margin for Alienware but would figure at least 15-20% savings by building this yourself. The 680i chipset will support 45nm Penryn (so claims Nvidia). The 6850 will support 4 gigs of ram (your operating system will limit it to about 3.25 to 3.5 gigs if using the 32 bit system).
August 16, 2007 1:00:56 PM

Nice Case - $100
Nice PSU - $180
GTX GPU - $530
CPU - $320
Mobo - $160
Ram - $85
OS - $100
HDD - $75
2x CDROMS - $70
Keyboard/Mouse - $25
-----------
Total - $1645

That is a quick glance of prices from New Egg.
In General, I estimated slightly high since I don't think the parts AlienWare uses are junk so I did not always pick lowest price.

I would actually build it a bit cheaper.
I would not spend $100 on a Case when $50 will do fine.
I would not spend $180 on a PSU I could bet by with $120-130 and still have an extremely good PSU.

So, perhaps knock $100 off that total price to build it yourself.


Will it support the upgrade? Perhaps. Some 680i will support the Penryn. No telling about this particular Mobo.

3) Yes. The mobo should support upto 8gb though without Vista-64 you likely will not be able to use more than 3.2-3.5gb.

There is nothing wrong with buying a system like this, just know that you will be paying a handsome price to have it done for you.
Related resources
August 16, 2007 1:28:03 PM

Yes Zenmaster is right.Put it together yourself for half of the Alienware price or less.It's not that hard if you have all the right parts.E6750 CPU just out on Newegg for just over 200$.Decent PSU 100-150$Use the money saved to buy a killer monitor and still have money left over.
August 16, 2007 1:31:42 PM

But you get a "free" Alienware hat and mousepad.
August 16, 2007 1:40:13 PM

I bet I could pick up all sorts of hotties with an Alienware hat! HA!

Anyway, thanks for the replies!
August 16, 2007 1:55:17 PM

A few years back I had the extra cash and decided what the hell, I will let someone else build this one. So I went with Alienware.

The machine was fine, it ran great, and was very tidy inside. But, not to the point it justified the price. You are paying for a name with Alienware. Now that the Alienware name is simply an alias for Dell, youre better off elsewhere.

For the amount you spend on an Alienware system you can build a screaming rig yourself.

My 2 cents.
August 16, 2007 2:11:04 PM

I contacted Alienware about a year ago for one of their systems.

When I began asking some very detailed questions; IE which MoBo's they used; who's memory; which cooler; the PSU and other things like that; the reply was the MoBo's were developed by a well known MoBo maker but with some "propitiatory" mods; the memory was "Custom built special for Alienware"....

That was enough to cause me to design my own with off the shelf components.
August 16, 2007 2:16:26 PM

winkdaddy123 said:
Ok, I need to buy a new computer....75% for gaming, 25% for work. I do not have the expertise to build my own at this point.

Hmmm. Funny that, about 10 years ago I had just taken delivery of a P1 Dell PC (from memory). About £3000 of PC. Then, a couple of weeks later- a mate came round with his home-built PC that had cost him £1000 less- we benchmarked- I lost. It was the last PC I bought.

You'll not only save money- if you build right- you'll end up with a better rig. The only barrier to doing so is your own ability to read, learn and having a patient approach to it. The best bit? Your opening up a whole new avenue of knowledge- if its something you think you'll enjoy- don't be put off by thinking its too hard. Its not. If theres something you don't know / understand- guess what? You just found the place to ask :) 
August 16, 2007 2:34:59 PM

Gh0stDrag0n said:
But you get a "free" Alienware hat and mousepad.


You see, you have it backwords. You get a free computer when you buy their overpriced hat and mousepad for $4000.
August 16, 2007 3:19:17 PM

i agree with jwolf24601. cyberpowerinc is the place to buy from if you really cant/dont want to build your own. Depending on the parts your usually only losing 100-200 from building it yourself, sometimes less. I was considering buying from them but i opted to build mine just because I like to build lol.
August 16, 2007 3:56:27 PM

I bought a computer from cyberpowerinc when it was called cyberpowerpc. They do have cheap prices and I can not beat their prices when comparing them to other vendors. I have had a bad experience with them though. When I got my pc, all the parts inside other then the processor looked like they were just thrown in there. Nothing was in their correct socket. Not only they, they were over 1 month late with delivery. I ordered in may and got it at the end of July.

I have a friend who bought from them. His mobo recently blew because of the power supply they gave him. The power supply was a 20 pin. His motherboard was 24. It took it about a year, but it finally broke (both power supply and mobo).

I do recommend them over dell, but i still don't recommend them over newegg/build it your self.
August 16, 2007 4:22:33 PM

I have also had good experience with ibuypower. Their prices are good untill you start upgrading to the top end cpus and video cards. I would recommend them in the $1000-$1500 prebuilt catagory.
August 16, 2007 4:24:50 PM

barneybadass said:
I contacted Alienware about a year ago for one of their systems.

When I began asking some very detailed questions; IE which MoBo's they used; who's memory; which cooler; the PSU and other things like that; the reply was the MoBo's were developed by a well known MoBo maker but with some "propitiatory" mods; the memory was "Custom built special for Alienware"....

That was enough to cause me to design my own with off the shelf components.

dell owns Alienware and dell has MoBo's were developed by a well known MoBo maker but with some "propitiatory" mods
August 16, 2007 4:26:13 PM

pc world rated cyberpowerinc with a very low rating.
August 16, 2007 4:32:13 PM

Surferosa said:
Hmmm. Funny that, about 10 years ago I had just taken delivery of a P1 Dell PC (from memory). About £3000 of PC. Then, a couple of weeks later- a mate came round with his home-built PC that had cost him £1000 less- we benchmarked- I lost. It was the last PC I bought.

You'll not only save money- if you build right- you'll end up with a better rig. The only barrier to doing so is your own ability to read, learn and having a patient approach to it. The best bit? Your opening up a whole new avenue of knowledge- if its something you think you'll enjoy- don't be put off by thinking its too hard. Its not. If theres something you don't know / understand- guess what? You just found the place to ask :) 


What a great post. I bought my last computer 5 years ago from Cyberpower and was completely happy, but will build my next for these exact reasons. Plus better parts I believe. :) 
August 16, 2007 4:41:06 PM

Yeah! building it yourself is much cheaper but thats for the experienced persons only.
Handling and proper assembling is much needed to make a high performance and stable rig. It is not just an ordinary toy to put up with your ordinary hands. It is a static sensitive device. Improper handling may cause unstabilty or may cause your system not to function well. In the end you wasted alot of money.

Even the microsoft guys + the EA games use alienware they are techies already. So why bother? Just a suggestion which include facts.
August 16, 2007 5:01:27 PM

pogsnet said:
Even the microsoft guys + the EA games use alienware they are techies already. So why bother? Just a suggestion which include facts.


Most big companies use pre-built systems because it is cheaper for them. Since they are going to be buying a lot of PCs it will take a lot of time to put them all together, they also need to source all of the parts from supplier vendors. Its not like Microsoft is going to to be ordering 100 motherboards from Newegg. Also there will be problems with some of the PCs, even with low failure rates if you get enough systems there will be some failing, and it is much cheaper for them to send it to someone else under warranty then to pay an employee to diagnose the problem.
When an individual spends a bit of time putting together a PC and fixing any problems all it costs them is a little bit of time. It actually costs a company money though. They also can get replacement parts shipped in really quickly, where as the normal RMA process is rather long. They also order enough PCs that they pay considerably less for each PC even from someplace like Dell then us individuals would pay from the same company.




As far as which motherboards Dell uses in their PCs, they use Intel motherboards. Maybe not all of them (of course not the AMD based systems) and it is probably less likely at the high end, but the majority of the mainstream PCs they sell use Intel motherboards. I spent about 6 months testing returned motherboards so I've seen them first hand. Gateway uses Intel too. That was about 2 years ago now, and things could have changed, but it is highly likely that they are still using Intel.
August 16, 2007 5:16:03 PM

I disagree.Building your own is so easy a caveman could do it.Also I know some people that you might think are "techie"because they are good with software or know the business side of tech but know next to nothing when they open up the case.They just get the Alienware or the FalconNW,Macs etc. and don't worry about the hardware or the price.
August 16, 2007 5:18:22 PM

Joe_The_Dragon said:
pc world rated cyberpowerinc with a very low rating.

I agree.
August 16, 2007 5:20:54 PM

uberman said:
I disagree. Building your own is so easy a caveman could do it. Also I know some people that you might think are "techie" because they are good with software or know the business side of tech but know next to nothing when they open up the case. They just get the Alienware or the FalconNW, Macs etc. And don't worry about the hardware or the price.


First it was Geico, now you! Will they never leave us alone!!!
August 16, 2007 5:26:24 PM

I don’t like that the Alienware machine has 700watt PSU for a SLI MB... future upgrades may require more juice then 700W.
August 16, 2007 5:34:41 PM

grieve said:
I don’t like that the Alienware machine has 700watt PSU for a SLI MB... future upgrades may require more juice then 700W.


I think if you select SLI during the online configuration, it actually defaults to a 1000 PSU
August 16, 2007 5:37:44 PM

spaztic7 said:
First it was Geico, now you! Will they never leave us alone!!!


So once you order all the parts, how long does it typcially take you guys to assemble everything (on average), troubleshoot, and get a rig up and running?
August 16, 2007 5:47:46 PM

Given the cost they buy parts at I would say they are getting $1,200+ for the labour.

A Jr High school kid can put parts together in an hour,I can do it in 20 minutes.
Installing the OS can take 40 mins via CDROM.
August 16, 2007 6:21:19 PM

Do you have any technical ability at all? Can you change a card or power supply? Or at least follow the extremely obvious and simple directions to do it? Even desktop Big-Box Store systems, provided they have the PCI-e x16 slot and many do now are just a better video card (and PSU) away from a "gaming" system. Both of which are two extremely easy upgrades that, just for your own education, I suggest do anyway to get your feet wet. At any rate, the point is even going that way is still cheaper then Alienware, and still without 90% of the headache of building your own if you don't know how.

Me, I build my own, but even if I didn't, I know enough to know Alienware is about as close to a rip off as you can get this side of a Mac... now THAT is a ripoff hardware-wise. I would just buy an upgradeable system and go the distance myself. As long as you don't buy the lowest-end piece of crap $400 system. Talk to people there and find out about it's expandability, especially video-wise,and size of the chassis to be sure it will fit the PSU and Video Card you need, if they don't know find someone who does, and if it's got a reasonably recent processor in the e6300-e6600 range with 2GB of memory you've got a good start. And even the most basic of self-upgrading is a good beginning. Replacing a PSU is as easy as copying what the previous guy did, just pay attention, but with a newer part.
August 16, 2007 6:25:59 PM

I used Ibuypower for barebone use, today you can get an intel quad core bare bone for 739. Which is not bad. 3 year warrenty cames in handy for me since i had 2 defects, mobo chipset fan(defective) and harddrive(maxtor junk) they just sent new replacements with better named parts. But still they got horrable ratings, if you don't need your hand held you can go for www.cyberpowerpc.com or www.ibuypower.com
August 16, 2007 6:29:23 PM

winkdaddy123 said:
So once you order all the parts, how long does it typcially take you guys to assemble everything (on average), troubleshoot, and get a rig up and running?


I've only built two before. The first one a buddy helped and I realized how easy it actually is. The second one I built on my own and it only took me 2-3 hours.
August 16, 2007 7:15:16 PM

Hmm i disagree. I ordered two computers from cyberpowerpc within the last 3 years and everything was great. Fast delivery and very neat inside. Also, there were lots of headway to overclock.
August 16, 2007 7:51:07 PM

winkdaddy123 said:
So once you order all the parts, how long does it typcially take you guys to assemble everything (on average), troubleshoot, and get a rig up and running?


I have built around 6 systems for my family and myself. Putting the hardware together is fairly easy for me now, but there are some things I have learned.

  • I will only buy the motherboard locally, so that I can easily exchange it if it is broken. It is the only component that I will not buy from an e-tailer.

  • There are things that the manuals are fuzzy about. You need a running PC that is connected to the net that you can use to read manuals that come on CDs, look up additional info on the net, and download the latest drivers for the various components. This is especially true for the motherboard.

  • Have a package of twisty or wire ties handy that you can use for wire/cable control.

    After all the hardware is assembled, you then need to setup the bios for the mother. If it has onboard sound or video, and you have add-on cards, you need to disable them in the bios. You need to ensure that it will boot from the CD/DVD drive for the next step.

    After the bios setup, it is time to install Windows. This takes hours, but is a straight forward process. If you are installing XP, be sure you have a version with SP2 or SP2 handy on a CD, because you may not be able to install drivers for other things (like your WIFI card) without it already installed. You want to avoid the catch-22, where you can't get your internet connection to work until you have downloaded something. Then you gotta activate windows and go through the live update / reboot process until everything is updated.

    Then it is time to upgrade all of your device drivers to the latest versions, rebooting for each.

    Then start installing your applications, starting with antivirus, and the many update/reboots that they require.

    So, anyone that tells you that building a new system is easy and does not take much time is smoking something. Good luck!
    August 16, 2007 9:29:21 PM

    Build it yourself. I built my first computer for my 12 birthday. (I am currently 13.) I did all the research myself. I put it together with no help. I fixed my problem with no help. (I messed up the front panel buttons.) As far as assembling went it took me under half an hour. And to top it all off I built it for relitevely cheap. Around $150 for a 3000+ venice, cheap mobo, 512mb RAM, 160gb HD, and a fairly nice case. (I oced the proc using stock cooling to 2.5)

    Using newegg this is how much that system would cost. (If you search around you can always find much better deals.)

    Intel e6850 $330
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

    Evga 680i motherboard. Probably as close as you can get to alienware's board. $210
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

    PNY 8800GTX A stock speed 8800GTX, what you would get with alienware. $530
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

    RAM OCZ Gold 800mhz. Probably much higher quality than Alienware's RAM. $65
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (after rebate)

    HD Western Digital 250GB SATA $68
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

    DVD drive LITEON drive x2 $80
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

    PSU OCZ 780W PSU Almost undoubtedly higher quality than the alienware one. $180
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

    Case Antec 900 A good case with excellent cooling. Great price with rebate $130
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

    OS Vista Home Premium $111
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

    Total +_____
    $1695 +tax
    Tell me if I messed that up.

    So, for $800 you get
    Keyboard: Alienware® USB Full-Size Keyboard
    Mouse : Alienware® Optical 3-Button Mouse with Scroll Wheel
    Warranty: 1-Year AlienCare Toll-Free 24/7 Phone Support w/ Onsite Service
    Alienware Extras: Alienware® Mesh Cap
    Alienware Extras: Alienware® Mousepad
    Alienware Extras: AlienInspection - Exclusive Integration and Inspection - $100 Value - FREE!
    Alienware Extras: AlienWiring - Exclusive Internal Wire Management - $100 Value - FREE!
    High-Performance Liquid Cooling: Alienware® Standard System Cooling (I might add you don't really need liquid cooling unless you are overclocking, and you have to service it usually 2 times a year)

    Also I might add, if you search you can always find better deals than newegg, and I was using higher quality parts. If I tried I could knock off at least $200 from that.
    August 17, 2007 2:04:03 AM

    winkdaddy123 said:
    So once you order all the parts, how long does it typcially take you guys to assemble everything (on average), troubleshoot, and get a rig up and running?

    Seeing how I used fedex.... If you remember correctly he got stomped out durring a superbowl.... the parts are still "in shipment"....
    August 17, 2007 3:09:34 AM

    I just had my friend build me a computer and I watched the whole time. There are tricky bits here and there, but we were able to get all the info needed from the motherboard manual and 90% of the plugs are self explanatory. I'm by no means 100% confident now but I will most definitely be ordering and building my next computer by myself.

    And listen to DXRick...getting a dead mobo from an online vendor is rare but can be a huge pain in the butt when you're building your stuff. Brick and Mortar is where its at for the mobo
    August 17, 2007 9:31:21 AM

    winkdaddy123 said:
    So once you order all the parts, how long does it typcially take you guys to assemble everything (on average), troubleshoot, and get a rig up and running?

    Let me see:

    1) Assemble everything on a table / workbench: admire lovingly 5 mins
    2) Read Mobo documentation with beer (unless evga- then just beer) 15 mins
    3) Unpack / assemble case with psu 10 mins
    4) Mount mobo 5 mins
    5) Prepare & mount cpu & hsf 5 mins
    6) Install 1 ram stick 14.2 secs
    7) Install & connect gpu (5 mins)
    8) Bios Boot test & ano beer 15 mins
    9) Amend bios settings (ie amend any required raid options / change boot options / etc) 10 mins
    10) Install & connect optical drives
    11) Connect case fans 5 mins
    12) Connect pci/pci-e cards (sound / tuner / etc) 5 mins
    13) Connect HD(s) 5 mins
    14) 2nd boot test, 3rd beer 15 mins (by now you should have a nice warm feeling from job neally-done and strong european lager beginning to kick in)
    15) Unplug just about everything and relay / tie the cables under mobo / back of case etc 2 hours (ok- Im a bit anal about how I like my cabling- skip this bit if you want: just keep them out the way of obvious air flow points)
    16) Load windows & let ms update do its thang 1-2 hours.

    Troubleshooting will either take no time, or lots of time. Really depends on what the, erm, trouble is.

    The quickest Ive ever built a rig was 1 hour: I know this cos it was on christmas eve for my daughter because I started at 12.00. However, the first time I built one I took a whole weekend: bit by bit, making sure I was doing everything right. Lots of reading, lots of breaks ;) 

    There are some things that will trip you up unless you read up on them:

    1) Static Discharge
    Computers dont like static. Ive killed a mobo & some ram before. The lesson I learnt is to ignore it at your peril- there are some very, very simple things you can do to reduce the risk- read up on them.

    2) CPU / HSF
    Heard some horror stories here (many that start with, 'so what, I didn't need to use the whole tube of thermal paste?'). Again, read up before you do it. Basically, the words 'a small grain of rice spread evenly around the centre' seem to sum things up nicely.

    3) Having a backup pc
    So, you've got a problem in your build. Maybe need to download drivers, visit here to ask advice, or surf for pron to ease the frustration. And what- you sold you old rig to your granny for a packet of worthers-originals cos you were getting a uber-rig? Next time, keep it as a backup till your done, ya muppet.

    4) I used a mail-order company
    Listen- I don't use anyone else now other than mail order companies- its the cheapest way. For some, its the only option anyhow. But on your first build, if you've got to pay a 10% premium for having some dude at a local store say 'well, duh.. youve gotta plug the 4-pin atx connector as well dude' then thats a price worth paying. Plus, if youve gotta have that rig like NOW- short of buying 2 of everything- you have no way of guaranteeing that everything you get works. Its electronic equipment: some of it is DOA. If its gonna ruin your life having to wait 7-10 days waiting for replacements- don't mail order.

    5) Im a loser
    So you bought an AMD board with a C2D cpu and DDR1 memory did you? All you had to do was make a post on here saying 'check my rig'. Or base your build on someone elses. Or read and understand the technical spec. Or ask a question. But you didnt do that did you- well, congratulations, you lose at life.

    Basically- get yourself a decent 'how to build on own pc' guide before you start / order. Anything you don't understand- ask.



    August 17, 2007 10:32:15 AM

    Yea, just ask if you need help. We won't pick on your lack of knowledge too much.;) You might become addicted to the whole process of building/upgrading your own PC like some of us are, and be able to offer help to some other n00b one day. :lol: 
    Anyway grasshopper you will save money, get a better PC, and learn something building your own.
    August 17, 2007 10:33:04 AM

    Like I alrady said a Jr High school kid can slap it together in an hour easy and people like myself that have done it a few times in only 20 minutes.
    The OS install via cd-rom takes about 40 mins (it formats the new dive as well as install OS).

    Saves about $1,200 over Dell doing it for you AND you have a real OS disk to keep which HP or Dell never give you that worth up to another $180!

    If your in Ventura/LA/Orange county California I would drive to your house and put it together,overclock it and even use my leagal XP builders disk set OS for $300.

    I could also work with you via UPS if your ouside of California but still in the USA becuase of the laws.

    In the past 6 years I have built alot of systems for profit and have over 25 years in working with computer and 2-way radio while my main trade has been general constuction and contracting. Look at my personal system using the icon @ the top of my post.

    I will be leaving LA in a week to look at a few homes in nothern California and south Oregon for investments but will be checking PM's/emails and some of the sites I help admin that deal with game programers but plan to return in October.

    Z
    August 22, 2007 8:07:53 PM

    Yes, a caveman can put together the pieces after a long time. I am talking about the reliability if you cant handle them well. The proper way of holding up to putting the pieces on proper places that requires knowledge.

    PC parts are static sensitive devices and very sensitive to hands. It may not instantly damage but may cause unstability. Also sensitive to magnets. Avoid using magnetic screw drivers.

    Suggestion: read more about static handling before building one. Proper handling is also noted in the manual but not too informative.

    Again it may not damage instantly but it will affect the stability and performance of your rig.

    If you can buy HP, DELL, IBM and others I think much better if you go to Alienware which is built for performance already.
    August 23, 2007 12:56:52 AM

    I would bet that most of the people on these forums that build thier own never went to school for it or wear anti-static devices etc. Everybody has to start somewhere and if you can use a screwdriver and read you can build your own.If everybody just went and bought HP,Dell etc there wouldn't be much use for this forum.Tom's is a good place to get some education despite the sometimes conflicting advice.
    August 24, 2007 2:48:55 AM

    I spent $3500 for a 486 from Zeos back when 66 mhz was fairly new. Ran a 3 line BBS and flight sims simultaneously under Windows in 8MB of RAM.

    Kept that machine for over 10 years just because I spent more on it than my car. Wasn't because I didn't know how to build it, just was burned out with memory daughtercards and fighting MFM drive controllers on the previous machine.

    Can't say I miss that.
    August 24, 2007 4:01:53 AM

    It's so much better now but it is quite a job to stay up on all the new hardware lately.But it is great for the consumer to know what is out there and what it's worth to avoid bad and/or expensive choices.
    !