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can a monitor damage a graphics card?

Tags:
  • Graphics Cards
  • Monitors
  • Graphics
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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August 28, 2007 1:02:32 PM

actually my problem just happened a while a go..
when i got home, my father said that i should check if the newly connected broadband is working.. unfortunately it didn't work..

then, as i was fixing the ip address of my computer. the monitor suddenly turned to a "no signal" state like the light on the monitor just turned to orange (the one that you can determine if the monitor is ON/OFF). the worst thing is, the whole CPU(GPU) was only bought last week..

i tried to reboot the pc but nothing happened..

i tried to also connect my CPU in my cousins monitor.. again the same problem happened.. i dunno what happened but i think the monitor damaged my video card.. can you please help?

btw my graphics card is: inno3d 8500 gt 512mb ddr2

More about : monitor damage graphics card

a c 143 U Graphics card
a b C Monitor
August 28, 2007 2:07:46 PM

I would say your graphics card died, but I wouldn't blame the monitor for it. Can you try another graphics card in that computer with that mmonitor, just to make sure it's the graphics card's problem indeed?
August 28, 2007 2:13:20 PM

for the record.. we have another pc and it also has the same problem
you think there's a problem in the monitor?

btw, can it be that the problem could be in the socket?
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August 28, 2007 2:15:33 PM

I honestly don't think the monitor can do damage.

Connecting your computer to your cousin's monitor (and having the same result) doesn't effectively narrow down to your faulty monitor if you are thinking that the monitor did the damage. If even your cousin's monitor didn't work, I'm more inclined to say that the GPU is faulty. If the monitor caused the damage, we are not certain, but I highly doubt so.

There are a lot of factors that could attribute to a faulty GPU. Can range from PSU issues, a short circuit, accumulating heat or simply bad quality control on Inno3D's part. Try installing another working video card and test from there. In any case, since your system is relatively new, I don't think you'll have much problems RMA'ing.

Hope this helps.

PS
Please don't confuse the term "CPU" with your entire system. The CPU is just a component of your system.
August 28, 2007 2:24:55 PM

jeric_17,

What do you mean "socket?" As in the power outlet? If so, then yes, it is possible. Make sure you get the voltages right.

Do you use 110V or 220V in your household? Makes me wonder though, if your monitor is 110V and you plugged it into 220V, then it would've popped or hopefully, a fuse kicked in. If vice versa (220V monitor to a 110V socket), the monitor should be exhibiting erratic behavior.

If ever you're going to work with voltages, I personally don't recommend a transformer. Try a reputable AVR with the appropriate voltage output. A personal thing, though. You can go for a transformer if you want.
August 28, 2007 2:33:49 PM

sorry for incomplete posting..

i mean the socket for the monitor.

and does dead graphics card means that it does no longer work?
because the fan of the GC is still running..

and i haven't tried the "remove battery thing" in the MB

btw, thanks for the advice.. ill try it later..
August 28, 2007 2:48:17 PM

I had a computer and projector do this, and it was caused by the use of the wrong kind of power cable for one of the two. I couldn't tell you whether I had to switch from grounded to non-grounded, or vice versa, and on which component I did so, but that solved a current loop problem that was causing the graphics card output to turn itself off. That was happening on both a PCIe X16 X1800XL, and on a cheapo PCI graphics card that I got for testing purposes.
August 28, 2007 2:48:38 PM

If you're concerned about the "socket for the monitor" then most likely there are just two: VGA or DVI. So just check where your monitor plug fits into the videocard output. VGA is often colored blue and DVI is often white.

And yes, a dead graphics card means it no longer works, even if fans are spinning. The fans just show that it receives power, but doesn't necessarily means it functions.

For now, replace your videocard with a working one and see if you get something from your monitor. If there is output, then your Inno3D 8500 is dead. RMA it. If none, we need to do further troubleshooting from there.

Don't reset your CMOS battery yet. We're still isolating if it's a video card issue.
August 28, 2007 3:07:00 PM

just asking.. what does RMA mean?

and what if my psu is only 320W does it concern of what is happening right now?

maybe the specs affected it..

btw, here's the specs:

Intel Core 2 Duo E4400(2.00ghz)
1G RAM
180G hard drive
Intel D946GZAB motherboard
320W psu
and the inno3d 8500 gt 512mb graphics card
August 28, 2007 3:23:38 PM

RMA stands for Return Merchandise Authorization. It's when you contact your supplier to have a defective product repaired or replaced. Although the term "RMA" is often used in the context of online shopping. But in the context of retail outlets, "Warranty repair," "exchange" or "return" might make more sense. RMA and warranty are spiritually the same thing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Return_Merchandise_Authorization

I don't think your PSU will have any trouble powering that system. 8500GT's are relatively low power consumers.
August 28, 2007 3:41:14 PM

thanks for the quick reply.. ^^

another question, does temperature also concern this problem?
should i put another fan near the GC?

how about short circuit?

PS

im from the philippines its 11:00pm now and im waiting for any reply
im just so paranoid of what happened to my GPU(correct me if im wrong) because it's only a week old and i haven't really used it(i played at least 4 games of DotA). and its GC might have died.. and i dont want it to happen because the money that was spent to buy the GPU is what my father won at a lottery. and even if it is RMA'd the thing that's bugging my mind is this problem might happen again.. i really want to know the cause of this problem so it won't happen again.
August 28, 2007 3:58:59 PM

Astig. Pinoy ka rin pala. Mabuhay.

Anyway, yes, temperature and a short are possibilities, but we are trying to eliminate the most probable cause first and the best way we can solve this right now is by using a substitute card.

Please try this first then report back. If the video card is not the problem, then we will move on to other possibilities.
August 28, 2007 4:13:23 PM

I just really want to know what's the cause..

I mean look:
-we have another pc(actually it's a 2nd hand) and sometimes it has the same problem..ung tipong weder-weder ung pc

-i also tried the new pc with the other pc's monitor and it didn't also work.

-or something is wrong with our electricity baka lumalagpas ng 220v yung sa mismong outlet

-or there is something wrong with the assembly of the wires in the motherboard that caused the GC to short.. but if the GC shorted why does the fan still operate?

PS
pinoy ka rin pala.. baka naman nag-ggg client ka? laro naman tayo minsan kung maayos pa tong pc ko hehe
August 28, 2007 4:23:09 PM

First, the PC you are using now, is it the same PC in question?

And next, we will be one step closer to knowing the cause once you substitute the card. Because quite frankly, the problem right now is that you haven't tested with another card.

I second aevm's suggestion to test another GPU.
August 28, 2007 4:33:00 PM

no its my cousin's..

so i'll just get the GC of the other pc and put it in the problem pc?

then if the other GC works, this means that GC of the new pc is dead?

but if the other GC also does not work, then the MB is the problem?

PS
i'll just read your reply tomorrow.. got to go sleep.. i still have classes tomorrow..
August 28, 2007 4:46:58 PM

Quote:

so i'll just get the GC of the other pc and put it in the problem pc?

then if the other GC works, this means that GC of the new pc is dead?


Yes, and yes.

Quote:
but if the other GC also does not work, then the MB is the problem?

We will see then. If this is the case, here are a few points to get you started:

1. Reseat all of your hardware. Check if it goes through POST successfully. If you are using dual channel RAM, make sure you use the correct corresponding RAM slots. If you are using only a single RAM chip, connect it to the slot nearest the processor.

2. Connect your essential hardware (CPU, RAM, HDD, GPU) ONLY and check if it goes through POST successfully. If your motherboard has intergrated video and audio, do NOT connect your GPU and sound card. Even if it has no integrated audio, do not connect a sound card.

Along the way, post any beep codes, if any, that you hear. Also include what kind of BIOS do you use. Phoenix, AMI, etc. Check your motherboard documentation or manufacturer for this information.
August 28, 2007 11:41:23 PM

Lol... when I read the topic I thought you smashed your monitor on the graphics card... NO your monitor cannot damaged a video unless you smah em against each other.
October 15, 2008 1:27:41 PM

jeric_17 said:
actually my problem just happened a while a go..
when i got home, my father said that i should check if the newly connected broadband is working.. unfortunately it didn't work..

then, as i was fixing the ip address of my computer. the monitor suddenly turned to a "no signal" state like the light on the monitor just turned to orange (the one that you can determine if the monitor is ON/OFF). the worst thing is, the whole CPU(GPU) was only bought last week..

i tried to reboot the pc but nothing happened..

i tried to also connect my CPU in my cousins monitor.. again the same problem happened.. i dunno what happened but i think the monitor damaged my video card.. can you please help?

btw my graphics card is: inno3d 8500 gt 512mb ddr2


Contrary to what everybody else has just said, I DO think that the monitor damaged the card - probably due to static.
I have had this exact same problem with this exact same card, only I was connecting a CRT television to the euro-out with both computer + tv switched on. The computer already has a monitor, this was a 2nd display. I felt a slight static off the plug from the tv (which often happens), and within 30secs of connecting the tv the display started to mess up. On restart it worked only in VGA mode. I took the card out and put it back in again (just incase it had come loose) - same result. I tried another 8500GT nvidia card, which I bought off a friend, and worked perfectly again first time.

I suspect the monitor that damaged the card (if it was that) was a CRT monitor, and in my experience it is common to get small/moderate amounts of static off the input cables of both CRT tvs and monitors. The lesson in my case is - don't connect a CRT monitor to a decent graphics card, least of all a TV, and if you must make sure BOTH are powered off when you do.
May 31, 2009 10:57:14 AM

very similar problem lately. computer acted normal starting up except nothing on screen. tried different monitor - nothing. tried monitor on different computer - nothing. tried different video card on original computer - nothing - replaced video card and monitor - works fine. only thing I can figure is both went out at once. seems very strange.
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