Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Lapped my CPU, and now its dead :/

Tags:
Last response: in CPUs
Share
August 18, 2007 1:09:19 AM

Yup you heard it right.

Decided to lap my e4300. Got the paper used soapy water and worked away till it was just about ALL copper.
Looked sweet too. Not mirror finish but it was flat and reflected things close by.

Plug it in...

Sys starts up for like 1/2 a sec then shuts down for 3sec. It repeats this 3 times before 'properly' coming to life. Then... nothing. GFX card fan goes to 100%
No life. CPU gets hot, but thats about it.

Tried bios reset etc... nothing. I THINK i may have been a bit generous with the water.

WHAAAA :( 

Anyway, now i gotta get a new cpu.
Budget isnt really an issue but i dont wanna blow big $$$ on it either.
I have a P5B-D mobo and 800Mhz ramz, and prob do 80/20 gaming/vid editing
What CPU considering Q6600 is the MOST im willing to spend

thx

More about : lapped cpu dead

August 18, 2007 1:12:21 AM

Wow that sucks... I would go with the Q6600 if I were you, I love mine, I do mostly gaming as of now.
August 18, 2007 1:29:19 AM

did you remember to clean the CPU?
Related resources
August 18, 2007 3:57:55 AM

Course i cleaned it.
Washed it under the tap for like 5min
August 18, 2007 4:06:49 AM

Well I personally would have recommended q-tips and isopropyl but the water "should not" hurt it at all. Unless the IHS was not completely sealed and some water leeched under the IHS. If its dead and you have nothing to loose, try baking it in a very low temp oven, like 200-225 degrees F for a few hours to dry it out and see if it works.

Also make sure its not something simple like not plugging in the aux. pwr. tot he CPU or the vid card got bumped out of the slot a bit.
August 18, 2007 4:25:11 AM

Was being sarcastic btw :p 
But i thought water would have been a sure killer. There is a little 'notch' on one side of the IHS, thought it would need a 'breather' hold of sorts.

B4 i plugged it in a cooked it on my room heater for ~30min @ ~50c.
Will give it a go at higher temp for longer and double check the rest of my sys.

Thanks
August 18, 2007 4:37:31 AM

Yea seriously water in and of itself should not damage it at all. Hell back in the day I used to literally WASH my motherboard under the sink with a toothbrush. Never had a problem. Just make sure its dry. In your case if you can see a gap around the IHS you probably did get some water under the IHS. Dry it on your heater, fairly low heat, overnight and hope for the best.
August 18, 2007 7:31:21 AM

excellent post on why not to lap your cpu! byby 3 yr waranty!

static discharge - you have low humidity live out west?
you may have g9t soap film on the cpu clean the contacts with alchol

you should not use soap only pure water or soft water
August 18, 2007 12:16:59 PM

Sounds like a little water under the cap. I remember my brother had a TB 1.4ghz chip back in the day. It was his first build and turned out almost like those pictures you see with TIM all over, yeah. So I soaked the cpu in bowl of warm, soapy water for a while. Scrubbed it off and let it dry for a day. Worked great.

Hmmm, on second thought, were you wearing gloves when handling the cpu? :sarcastic: 
August 18, 2007 2:15:18 PM

wow, i didn't even have that bad luck when i *removed* my e4300s ihs! however i did eventually break it :(  , but my new q6600 g0 works fine all lapped up and shiny... at 3.6ghz
August 18, 2007 2:28:40 PM

why go to so much trouble for so little gain? Why not use a mild acid instead and acid polish your IHS? This way you don't have to remove so much material to get the nice,even, smooth finish you're all looking for.

Just make sure and use distilled water when you clean it off and don't immerse it either..how dumb!
a b à CPUs
August 18, 2007 3:16:04 PM

The phrase "There is born every minute" [:mousemonkey:6] sprang to mind after reading the OP on this thread, no offence meant.
August 18, 2007 4:29:59 PM

Actually it the stupid ones that tend to breed most prolithically.

MrsBytch seems to forget that a mobo is made of fibre-glass and poly resin, components are made primarily of ceramic, and the only POSSIBLE way for water to hurt the board is if it gets inside of an electrolytic cpapcitor because the cap has a faulty seal or you arent smart enough to DRY your board after washing it.

Ask ANY NO2 or DI overclocker about preping boards. Hell these guys go through great lengths to clean the boards. Most go to lengths to even strip the conformal coating off the boards. and thats much more invasive them me holding a board under the sink for a bit.
a b à CPUs
August 18, 2007 4:46:03 PM

little_scrapper said:
Actually it the stupid one that tend to breed most prolithically.

MrsBytch seems to forget that a mobo is made of fibre-glass and poly resin, components are made primarily of ceramic, and the only POSSIBLE way for water to hurt the board is if it gets inside of an electrolytic cpapcitor because the cap has a faulty seal or you arent smart enough to DRY your board after washing it.

Ask ANY NO2 or DI overclocker about preping boards. Hell these guys go through great lengths to clean the boards. Most go to lengths to even strip the conformal coating off the boards. and thats much more invasive them me holding a board under the sink for a bit.

Dude, I'm not gonna dispute what you are saying, but the point is they know/realise what they're doing and as such take all the right measures to limit possible f***up's whereas some don't, and let's face it if those extra 5c are that important to you then you should at least have some semblance of an idea of what you are doing, and if not, then put down the screwdriver and step away from the computer.

EDIT: the word 'not' should have been in the original post but was omitted and without it the post does take a different tone and if it was responsible for the degradation of this thread I can only offer my humble apologies to evey one concerned.
August 18, 2007 4:54:36 PM

Boy, using tap water on electronics with open circutry seems pretty silly.
Water is one heck of a conductor and could get trapped under almost any part be it a capacitor, resister and so forth and short the leads. Or imagine the damage inside of a memory socket.
Antone that would suggest that it wont hurt to wash a motherboard with tap water as long as you dry it out needs to stop giving advice.
a b à CPUs
August 18, 2007 5:06:41 PM

Having washed automotive ignition parts and power tool internals in a degreaser until they were shiny,shiny, I know that liquids and electrical components can be brought together without adverse results, but tap water is not the medium that I would choose under any circumstance. :non: 
August 18, 2007 5:19:00 PM

mousemonkey:
Some people do need another 5-10C and dont have another $50-60 for high end cooling. Some people just dont have the means. Then there are people like me who are confidant with thier machanical skills and are experienced enough to do something like this just for the results and be able to say they did it. Failure here, is not a reason to never try it again unless you simply dont have the budget. Buts taths just a fact of life, if you cant afford to mess up then dont do it.

intelamduser:
your right, to someone who doesnt know or understand how to do it correctly it will seem VERY irrisponsible. But let be real here, first off I never actaully suggested to anyone to wash the board. Secondly, if you "dry" the board there is no water to short out anything. What part of this do you not understand. Obviously if your not cognizant enough to MAKE SURE your completely dry then yes you should not be doing this. I hadent cleaned my case in like a year and it was on shag carpet. I swear there must have been at least a 1/4" layer of dost on every single thing in the case including in all the crevases of the motherboard. So I washed it under the sink with a toothbrush. Worked so awsome I cant even tell you how well it worked. I "dried" my motherboard with a hairdryer then let it sit for a day or two. DRY means dry, no possible way for water to short out anything cause thie IS NO WATER! Dry doent mean leave water droplets in the slots and on the components...SHEEZZ!
August 18, 2007 5:20:02 PM

Gotta admit, I think anyone that would lap one of today's Core 2 or X2 CPU's is a bit of an idiot anyway. The precision with which they make these CPU's has completely eliminated the need for user intervention on a CPU. The heatsink is another matter. Many are poorly made and lapping can get you that extra 5 degrees.

If you are lapping your CPU today, you are simply doing it because you think you would then fall into the "cool tech" category, wrong, it's the idiot category you now fall in to. :kaola: 
August 18, 2007 5:26:24 PM

WOW!! redraider, Your ignorance is shining like a beacon. I dont mean to be insulting but do you have any idea how badly concave most all C2D IHS's are? Here let me show you a typical example:

EDIT: I could not find the pic of my IHS but it looked just like this, I think my IHS was actually worse then this.


When I find the pic of the ACTUAL CPU Ill switch the picture. But this is what a typical IHS on a C2D looks like. I have my own personal experience and I have seen dozens of pictures just like mine with the razor on a IHS.
a b à CPUs
August 18, 2007 5:39:33 PM

Do not recommend "Tap" water. Tap water is a conductive, Distilled water is not. This is do to the mineral content (PH factor greater than, or less than 7.0). The problem with washing with tap water is that when it drys it leaves all the minerals on the board (on cpU - the pins /sockets). This can create a resitive path between too points that should other wise be isolated. You may be lucky, or may just degrade performance, ie higher crossover noise.

Yes I have used Tap water - Once. I had a computer (486) given to me that had been in a house fire. Melted Keyboard, FFD and CD face Plate were warped, Took apart, Used Hose. BUT Then soaked in distilled water, and then 100% Alcohol. PS and Motherboard worked.

Don't forget Tap water causes oxidation of all the connector pins/sockets. metal oxides are insulators, not conductors. You could say no problem, when I plug it in it rubs the oxide off.
a b à CPUs
August 18, 2007 5:43:45 PM

little_scrapper I was not having a pop or taking a swing at you at all mate, but as other's have pointed out and I was trying to reiterate today's current CPU's do not need to be lapped or water cooled or LN2 cooled they will perform incredibly well on air alone and with the HSF provided by the manufacturer.

For those who want to push the boundaries and reach for the sky then it's a case of 'here endeth warranty and pass the fire extinguisher on the left hand side', some like yourself have the skills and the mindset to be able to approach the issue with a logical and methodical attitude, others will go at it like a bull in a china shop, I'm just glad the OP didn't try to cut his teeth on a QX6850 because that would have been heartbreaking to read.

Edit: reiterate was what was meant, whereas iriterate was typed, and I don't think that's even a proper word. [:mousemonkey:4]
a b à CPUs
August 18, 2007 5:59:27 PM

RetiredChief said:
Do not recommend "Tap" water. Tap water is a conductive, Distilled water is not. This is do to the mineral content (PH factor greater than, or less than 7.0). The problem with washing with tap water is that when it drys it leaves all the minerals on the board (on cpU - the pins /sockets). This can create a resitive path between too points that should other wise be isolated. You may be lucky, or may just degrade performance, ie higher crossover noise.

Yes I have used Tap water - Once. I had a computer (486) given to me that had been in a house fire. Melted Keyboard, FFD and CD face Plate were warped, Took apart, Used Hose. BUT Then soaked in distilled water, and then 100% Alcohol. PS and Motherboard worked.

Don't forget Tap water causes oxidation of all the connector pins/sockets. metal oxides are insulators, not conductors. You could say no problem, when I plug it in it rubs the oxide off.


I forgot to mention that I live in a 'hard water' area hence why I would never could never recommend tap water, but RetiredChief has just covered the lime scale problem a lot better than I could have done.
a b à CPUs
August 18, 2007 6:49:10 PM

I the cases where you REALY need The force of "TAP" water and or a toothbrush. Follow up with agitation in distilled water and then alcohol.
I use both becuase the have different abilities to desolve impurities left on the board. Then preheat oven to about 150 - 200 deg F. Turn oven OFF and place board/part in oven for 30->45 Min.
August 18, 2007 6:52:30 PM

well I lapped my Q6600, and my Apogee-Gt, both up to 2000 grit. nice and smooth.
overclocked to 3.6ghz it never goes above 52deg.
but after I lapped it I went away for a few days. guess it had all the time to dry
August 18, 2007 7:41:36 PM

RetiredChief said:
I the cases where you REALY need The force of "TAP" water and or a toothbrush. Follow up with agitation in distilled water and then alcohol.
I use both becuase the have different abilities to desolve impurities left on the board. Then preheat oven to about 150 - 200 deg F. Turn oven OFF and place board/part in oven for 30->45 Min.


R.C., your ability to describe the "proper" proceedure for safely cleaning is outstanding!!! But far to "practical" and of "common sence" than I could possibly muster. My fatal flaw is that I just dont care if I leave some micro mineral deposits on the board. And, I tend to underestimate the lenght in which less seasoned individuals will go to nit-pick my less than thorough explainations of how I washed my board or lapped my CPU.

I do appreciate being in the company of a truely seasoned tech such as yourself. Though I have been an electronic engineer for about 10 years. Unfortunately, I still find that I repeatedly have to defend my advice do to "not stupid proofing" my explainatains and anecdotes. This last comment is obviously NOT meant for you. It is fully for the benifit of the EE wannabees that try to tell me touching a case lying on carpet = grounded...hehe
August 18, 2007 8:08:47 PM

redraider_gamer said:
Hmmm, nice picture of the heat sink...

Check out this link http://www.legitreviews.com/article/402/1/

You might get 1-3 degrees out of a lapping. That is a total waste of time not good for anything but bragging...

I got a full 10C cooler by lapping my shist!! And I have before and after pics with CPUZ, Orthos, and Speedfan running to prove it.
a b à CPUs
August 18, 2007 8:16:02 PM

little_scrapper, Please do not take my advice as criticism, I was only saying what I would do. You appear to have an excellent grasp of electronics.

Me I'm just a lowly electronic tech. I do have over 120 SH of Electronics thru East ILL Univ. slight more than the average EE and I've worked with (defended myself) EE with Masters and PHD's.
August 18, 2007 8:24:19 PM

RetiredChief said:
little_scrapper, Please do not take my advice as criticism, I was only saying what I would do. You appear to have an excellent grasp of electronics.

Me I'm just a lowly electronic tech. I do have over 120 SH of Electronics thru East ILL Univ. slight more than the average EE and I've worked with (defended myself) EE with Masters and PHD's.


No no no R.C. we are kewl. I was not being sarcastic at all you obviously have a very solid grap of it all and the advice you dispence it spot on! Its half the rest of the crew that have NOTHING helpful to say and simply want to argue and flame the thread.
August 18, 2007 8:54:25 PM

ok so now i got a question.... do i really need globes when lapping a CPU??? cuz i did it without globes but i got this new motherboard and i guess that it does not takes 667 memory
a b à CPUs
August 18, 2007 9:04:09 PM

Globes ??
August 19, 2007 12:40:40 AM

I notice how concave a lot of heat sinks are but I thought thermal paste helps that by bringing the gap together and allowing heat to flow much better. Thermal paste does many jobs :)  Please correct me if I'm wrong.
August 20, 2007 8:21:07 AM

Reading this makes me feel like a pro. Seriously really, really, dumb thing to do. The risks are fantastically higher then any reward you could achieve.

Almost everything operates on the KISS theory (Keep It Simple, Stupid).

Put the CPU in your mobo, put paste on it, put paste on your HS and then strap it on securely. Toss a few extra fans in the case if you want to. Easy. No fuss, no muss, and no exposing electronics to blades, water, and other things you shouldn't do unless you are in the industry or bored to the point of masochism.

People always try to overdo things and it backfires constantly.
August 20, 2007 10:18:55 AM

I lapped my CPU but I never used water. My CPU was badly concaved and having the copper exposed instead of the nickle finish is better for thermal heat transfer. Water and electronics do not mix very well, I am shocked to hear that someone would use water at all. :heink:  Thats like putting a lightening rod on your head durring a lightening storm, your asking for it bigtime.

August 20, 2007 10:35:57 AM

little_scrapper said:
mousemonkey:
Some people do need another 5-10C and dont have another $50-60 for high end cooling. Some people just dont have the means. Then there are people like me who are confidant with thier machanical skills and are experienced enough to do something like this just for the results and be able to say they did it. Failure here, is not a reason to never try it again unless you simply dont have the budget. Buts taths just a fact of life, if you cant afford to mess up then dont do it.


I must admit, that if someone does not have the extra $50-$60 for a better cooling solution then they sure as hell will not have the extra $$$ for a dead processor. I will never understand what lapping will do for you when there are so many options as far as cooling goes that will get the same or better results. Now if the $$ is not an issue, then go for it, it is your $$ and you can waste it if you want. I personally would just wait another week or 2 and save the $$ to buy better cooling...
August 20, 2007 12:29:24 PM

But why go with water? There are lots of other options to remove impurities like air blower or a vacuum cleaner. Plus water as RetiredChief said due to minerals, minerals like Calcium Carbonate will build up on the contacts once dried. And trust me they will apply a thin layer of scum to your 775 pinned processor.
a b à CPUs
August 20, 2007 1:23:18 PM

I can just see it now...."New ASUS PB-DAWN mainboard"
1333 mhz front side buss, dual quad core capable, SLI, dishwasher safe.
August 20, 2007 2:14:12 PM

"It worked for my keyboard...."

"It's got electrolytes!"

:lol: 
August 20, 2007 2:32:19 PM

I used water to lap my CPU. Guess what, not only does it work, but I am now running a full 10C cooler than I was before AND!!! I am running passive.
August 20, 2007 2:39:50 PM

skyline0511 said:
But why go with water? There are lots of other options to remove impurities like air blower or a vacuum cleaner. Plus water as RetiredChief said due to minerals, minerals like Calcium Carbonate will build up on the contacts once dried. And trust me they will apply a thin layer of scum to your 775 pinned processor.

calcium carbonate buildup !!! ahhh run away!!!!! You talk like someone is going to be washing thier board every other week and its going to look like your faucet after longterm exposure to hard water. This whole conversation started because I simply mentioned that I had washed my old mobo way back in the day. Well it was soo dirty with over a years worth of greasy dust, that no aircan or vaccuum was going to remove it all so I simply held it under the sink and scrubbed with saop and a toothbrush. Back in them day the CPU's had like 3 pins and its fine. But back in those days when you bought a computer it was EXPECTED that you would be using it for the next 3-5 years. Not like today where the products are soo much less robust and nearly made to be yearly disposable.
August 20, 2007 3:11:17 PM

Sure you now got 10C cooler and now running passive but would you wanna keep lapping a new processor that comes out and clean it with water? No! Back in the days like 10 YEARS AGO processors are expensive and rare, why the hell would you lap it just to gain ample degrees cooler? and having the risk of totally killing your CPU. If you got the guts to clean it with water then fine with me. Don't say I/we didn't warn you.
a b à CPUs
August 20, 2007 3:12:27 PM

little_scrapper said:
Back in them day the CPU's had like 3 pins

That's not a computer, it's an abacus. :lol: 
August 20, 2007 4:01:51 PM

RetiredChief said:
Do not recommend "Tap" water. Tap water is a conductive, Distilled water is not.


Not true. Distilled water is typically less conductive than tap water, but if it's water, it's measurably conductive. If you could hypothetically make 100.000000000% pure water (this has not been accomplished yet) then it would still be measurably conductive. An equilibrium exists in water whereby the neutral molecule dissociates into protons and hydroxide ions. To be finicky, the protons associate with neutral water molecules so an approximate representation would be:

2H2O = H3O+ + OH- (where the equal sign denotes the rection double arrow)

The purest water I've seen reported in the literature contained measurable sodium ions, chloride ions, etc. They add to the connductivity. Your recommendation to use alcohol as the final solvent is a good one. Even reagent grade ethanol contains traces of water and that, combined with ethanol's polarity makes it a good solvent to follow after a water wash. Methanol is also good but it's even more toxic than ethanol. In the lab, I use isopropanol but do not be tempted to use rubbing alcohol because most drug-store products contain lanolin and thus leave an oily film behind.

August 20, 2007 4:03:10 PM

water will not hurt your CPU. Unless you do not dry it properly. Or your IHS is defective and has an airgap that allows water to leech underneath it. Then again that also goes to NOT DRYING IT PROPERLY.

Last time I checked, water doesnt hurt ceramic, silicon, gold, ect... the things a CPU is made of.
August 20, 2007 5:38:53 PM

I think we should all have a big fight about how everyone does things their own way. BTW i have washed a toaster before cause i got some butter in it. As for washing a mobo i just use a vacuum cleaner, i know static and all that but it has never not worked. Vacuum cleaners are brilliant for de-dusting fans. If you have an oven and some silica gel then feel free to wash away.
a b à CPUs
August 20, 2007 5:50:39 PM

Rabidpeanut have you ever stuck the vacuum cleaner onto a fan with LED's, always good for a giggle.
August 21, 2007 1:57:51 AM

tap water is usually a good conductor depends on the ions! lol!
August 21, 2007 4:01:14 AM

clue69less said:
Not true. Distilled water is typically less conductive than tap water, but if it's water, it's measurably conductive. If you could hypothetically make 100.000000000% pure water (this has not been accomplished yet) then it would still be measurably conductive. An equilibrium exists in water whereby the neutral molecule dissociates into protons and hydroxide ions. To be finicky, the protons associate with neutral water molecules so an approximate representation would be:

2H2O = H3O+ + OH- (where the equal sign denotes the rection double arrow)

The purest water I've seen reported in the literature contained measurable sodium ions, chloride ions, etc. They add to the connductivity. Your recommendation to use alcohol as the final solvent is a good one. Even reagent grade ethanol contains traces of water and that, combined with ethanol's polarity makes it a good solvent to follow after a water wash. Methanol is also good but it's even more toxic than ethanol. In the lab, I use isopropanol but do not be tempted to use rubbing alcohol because most drug-store products contain lanolin and thus leave an oily film behind.



I recommend methyl ethyl ketone ;) 
August 21, 2007 4:55:23 AM

dude measurably conductive and conductive such that it will a small glow to a bulb or shock you - i mean measurably!!!


dude the sun measurable heats Pluto! no?

the center of galaxy has a measurable amount of gravity on earth -yaya!

measurable! lol
!