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Repair Bad Sectors, HELP!

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December 4, 2007 9:03:51 PM

I need to know of the best program out there that lets you repair bad sectors on hard drives. I have already tried HDD Regenerator 1.51 and SeaTools but they couldnt help at all.

Is there anything better?

More about : repair bad sectors

December 4, 2007 9:14:46 PM

please is really important!!!!!!!!!!!
December 4, 2007 9:16:25 PM

Just any good program that fixes bad sectors with all the hopes from the world...
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a b G Storage
December 4, 2007 9:41:10 PM

Download UBCD, then use the "HDD Options" and select the appropriate manufacture, do a low level format. YOU WILL LOSE ALL DATA!!!!
December 4, 2007 9:57:48 PM

I need something that will repair it without making me lose my data! I cant format, is there any solution? SeaTools already repaired the errors it found but I still cant access the HDD.

Will try that Spinrite 6 but I really need something that will do its best to bring back my HDD without losing any data!

Thanks for the help guys!
December 4, 2007 10:23:37 PM

any other help is still welcome ;) 
December 4, 2007 10:28:23 PM

have you try the scandisk???
December 4, 2007 10:32:57 PM

Fleelex is right on target. Spinrite 6.0 will do a non-destructive overlay of your hard drive and in many instances will allow you to recover any valuable data you have on the drive.

Edit: Spinrite 6.0 will allow you to create a boot CD to accomplish this task.

Good Luck!
December 4, 2007 10:33:38 PM

Well, when I turn the computer on, it says Chkdsk needs to check drive D and it starts the counter, after it it says the following

MFT is damaged, scan aborted...

And Chkdsk in WxP is not the same one as win98, remember how u opened scandisk and it was like a program, in xp is a DOS window so I dont really know how to use it that way.

I need to recuperate the data in this drive otherwise I dont know what im gonna do.
December 4, 2007 11:08:51 PM

ntsf.com I've used some of their software before and it will scan and rebuild your boot record and let you transfer the data (that is recoverable) off of the failing drive.

I'm not sure the exact version I used but it did recover most of my files. Took about 7 hours for a 200 gb drive in a usb 2.0 enclosure

Good luck. Let us know if it works and BACK UP.
December 5, 2007 9:23:06 PM

Thanks bc, that sounds like a good program.

Also I have to mention, there is a certain point in which HDD Regenerator and Spinrite slow down (like at 68%), there is this weird sound coming from the HDD that repeats itself and the programs start going super slow. I dont know why it slows down the checking.

Gonna try ntsf.com asap, thanks
December 5, 2007 10:10:43 PM

After you do manage to recover the data you may want to take a peak at the drive itself to see if it is indeed corrupted as it may provide a window to why it occured.

You cannot really "fix" bad sectors, although sometimes they sectors are marked bad due to logical or software problems, rather than physical problems. DBAN is a great piece of free software that is designed to wipe your harddrive but scans it thoroughly on the way. If there is physical problems though, it will thrash it pretty bad. Its included in a self booting iso available from sysresccd.org. You can get it on its own but that cd image comes with a plethora of valuable tools.

Hit the F1-X keys for more information at the boot: prompt.
a b G Storage
December 5, 2007 10:24:34 PM

Thats why you need to have a back copy of your files
December 5, 2007 10:55:38 PM

Hey slim142, HDD Regen. 151 more then likely repaired your bad sectors, but only to the point that you can access the data by slaving it and not booting off of it. I've used HDD reg. 151 many of times and find in a worst case scenario where it it effective you have to slave it to access and recover and data.
December 5, 2007 11:04:23 PM

I don't know if this is of any value, but it looks like the MFT is mirrored on the disk and may be recoverable. This assumes the drive isn't failing completely.

ntfsdoc.pdf
Quote:
4.2. Notes
4.2.1. Other information
Everything is a file in NTFS. The index to these files is the Master File Table (MFT). The MFT lists the
Boot Sector file ($Boot), located at the beginning of the disk. $Boot also lists where to find the MFT.
The MFT also lists itself.
Located in the centre of the disk, we find some more Metadata files. The interesting ones are:
$MFTMirr and $LogFile. The MFT Mirror is an exact copy of the first 4 records of the MFT. If the
MFT is damaged, then the volume could be recovered by finding the mirror. The LogFile is journal of
all the events waiting to be written to disk. If the machine crashes, then the LogFile is used to return the
disk to a sensible state.
Hidden at the end of the volume, is a copy of the boot sector (cluster 0). The only Metadata file that
makes reference to it is $Bitmap, and that only says that the cluster is in use.

December 5, 2007 11:08:36 PM

There is a difference between bad sectors and data corruption. If Windows CHKDSK is saying that the MFT is damaged, that's not necessarily indicative of bad sectors.

What you need to do is recover the readable files on the drive without trying to mess with the drive in it's current state, in case it really is going bad.

GetDataBack for NTFS is the proper tool to use for this recovery. It will recover as much information from your drive as is possible. Until you can use this, STOP using the drive and attempting to use other tools on it - you'll likely only make the data harder to recover.

GetDataBack is a free download, but not a free program. It will run in free mode and show you what it can recover. You can then pay, register it, and activate the recovery. At $79, it's far cheaper than professional data recovery services.
December 5, 2007 11:12:46 PM

Hardware problems generally require hardware solutions. If it's that important you should seriously consider a professional recovery service and be prepared to cough up around $1000 with no guarantee that anything will be recovered.
December 9, 2007 6:41:02 PM

Thanks everybody for the help. Really appreciate. And yes next time Im doing backups, this thing is making me go crazy.

Well after going to ntfs.com I concluded that Active@ File Recovery might be the right solution. Unfortunately for me, my RAM died the day I was scanning the drive (it was at 15%), got an BSoD and turned out that my RAM was defectvive. Im glad it happened there and not later because while recovering my data it would have been worse.

Anyways, Im planning to RMA my RAM and then start the SuperScan from File Recovery and see if it recovers anything.

If for any reason it fails, then I will use GetDataBack for NTFS. After that, the only thing to do is to send it to Seagate Recovery File Service to see what they can do. Then Im screwed.

Something I learned from this

1)Always have backups
2)As soon as you find a bad sector, stop using the drive
3)Fixing the bad sectors doesnt mean continue using the drive

4 and Most importantly, Seagate is not getting my money for their drives anymore. Looking towards Samsung.
March 19, 2013 6:05:19 AM

First off buy a USB enclosure. Take the drive out and put it in the enclosure. It will be easier to deal with data recovery If you don't have to boot that disk. Then I recommend Acronis Disk Director because you can retrieve data from earlier restore points.
March 19, 2013 7:08:53 AM

slim142 said:
I need something that will repair it without making me lose my data! I cant format, is there any solution? SeaTools already repaired the errors it found but I still cant access the HDD.

Will try that Spinrite 6 but I really need something that will do its best to bring back my HDD without losing any data!

Thanks for the help guys!


slim142 said:
Thanks everybody for the help. Really appreciate. And yes next time Im doing backups, this thing is making me go crazy.

Well after going to ntfs.com I concluded that Active@ File Recovery might be the right solution. Unfortunately for me, my RAM died the day I was scanning the drive (it was at 15%), got an BSoD and turned out that my RAM was defectvive. Im glad it happened there and not later because while recovering my data it would have been worse.

Anyways, Im planning to RMA my RAM and then start the SuperScan from File Recovery and see if it recovers anything.

If for any reason it fails, then I will use GetDataBack for NTFS. After that, the only thing to do is to send it to Seagate Recovery File Service to see what they can do. Then Im screwed.

Something I learned from this

1)Always have backups
2)As soon as you find a bad sector, stop using the drive
3)Fixing the bad sectors doesnt mean continue using the drive

4 and Most importantly, Seagate is not getting my money for their drives anymore. Looking towards Samsung.


1. Magnetic drives have never been secure, why raid 1 & 10 is popular.
2. Eh, personally, I wouldn't, considering the bad sector is only going to corrupt the data that's being written to that singular sector, I'll just copy the data off and do a few scrubs of the drive
3. That's really up to you, a single bad sector is far from enough to RMA the drive, I'd continue using it myself, but, refer to 1.
March 19, 2013 7:12:31 AM

taughannock said:
First off buy a USB enclosure. Take the drive out and put it in the enclosure. It will be easier to deal with data recovery If you don't have to boot that disk. Then I recommend Acronis Disk Director because you can retrieve data from earlier restore points.


What? USB or SATA (or whatever else) makes zero difference on 'booting' from a disk. I run windows 7 off my SATA 3 SSD and I install windows (E.G. boot the install 'disk') off my USB 2 flash drive. Point? If anything it'll make everything slow as hell with zero added benefit, it'll also waste a bunch of cache buying the SATA <--> USB cabling.

Oh, and, aren't USB write blockers like $300?

Although, I do completely concur that he shouldn't be booting from a disk that he's trying to do tests on, although, I have no idea where the USB socket comes into play.
March 19, 2013 9:21:12 AM

If there is a noise coming from the hdd then there are no bad sectors, the drive arm or the mounting bracket inside the hdd is broken or become loose. The more tests you do on that hdd, the worse it will get untill all you will hear are clicking noises and a whirrr.

You have to remove the hdd from the PC , use in an enclosure or a usb to hdd connector (with external power supply cable) and copy the files you want to keep. Best to do it when the hdd is cold.

(Also, every time I read your posts, all I could hear in my head was Stewies voice hahaha).
March 19, 2013 9:24:18 AM

TenPc said:
If there is a noise coming from the hdd then there are no bad sectors, the drive arm or the mounting bracket inside the hdd is broken or become loose. The more tests you do on that hdd, the worse it will get untill all you will hear are clicking noises and a whirrr.

You have to remove the hdd from the PC , use in an enclosure or a usb to hdd connector (with external power supply cable) and copy the files you want to keep. Best to do it when the hdd is cold.

(Also, every time I read your posts, all I could hear in my head was Stewies voice hahaha).


Last I checked sectors mark which sector they are to stop broken heads thinking it's a broken disk, if the head reads that the sector its going over isn't the one it thinks it is, it'll know it's broken, not the sector.

At-least, that's what Wikipedia said when I read it ~ a month ago.
March 19, 2013 9:47:40 AM

When the reading arm is loose, it might be actually touching the disk and causing the bad sectors but there is still something wrong with the hdd. Take it out and give it a litle shake, if it rattles then you have faulty arm.

Windows 7 will not accept more than 1 bad sector (being about 4096kb), it will kick up BSoD.

Just take out the hdd, connect it via USB, and copy the files you want to keep however, you would need to replace the hdd with an OS hdd, the faulty hdd would act like an external hdd not the OS hdd, which is internal (usually).
March 19, 2013 12:17:12 PM

TenPc said:
When the reading arm is loose, it might be actually touching the disk and causing the bad sectors but there is still something wrong with the hdd. Take it out and give it a litle shake, if it rattles then you have faulty arm.

Windows 7 will not accept more than 1 bad sector (being about 4096kb), it will kick up BSoD.

Just take out the hdd, connect it via USB, and copy the files you want to keep however, you would need to replace the hdd with an OS hdd, the faulty hdd would act like an external hdd not the OS hdd, which is internal (usually).


I really don't encourage recommending anyone to shake a hard-drive, however lightly; I really doubt it'll do any good. Also, on a latter note, not sure about you but ever internal hard drive I've ever touched rattles when holding it, it's probably something to do with the air filter (No idea, too be honest) but I assure you, rattling sounds are made.

Another thing I'd like to point out is that there's no point in using a USB socket to transfer data, why not just use a sata cable? I highly doubt any MOBO that even exists anymore has only one SATA connector, the majority have six or eight.
March 19, 2013 12:51:55 PM

@AutomaticCoding I knew someone would pick me up about not shaking the hdd. It's not a quick shake ,just a little one. Jard drives with disks (not ssd) are not supposed to rattle, ever.

Even if there is a slight rattle it will still work to some degree. My 250 gb hdd that I found in a dumpster works just fine for my XP PC. My 160gb hdd that I took out of a DVD player with a recordable hdd rattles but still works fine. Both of them do occasionally get stuck in certain points but otherwise work fine, I just have to remember not to overfill the hdd's and not be to agressive with PC games.

Also, I'm referring to the external USB ports, not internal usb(?). External Sata ports, not familiar with them, I olny got motherboards with external usb ports.

Whatever you decide to do is up to you. Eventually, though, the OS will continually kick up more BSoD's and make the drive inaccessible.

March 19, 2013 1:02:57 PM

TenPc said:
@AutomaticCoding I knew someone would pick me up about not shaking the hdd. It's not a quick shake ,just a little one. Jard drives with disks (not ssd) are not supposed to rattle, ever.

Even if there is a slight rattle it will still work to some degree. My 250 gb hdd that I found in a dumpster works just fine for my XP PC. My 160gb hdd that I took out of a DVD player with a recordable hdd rattles but still works fine. Both of them do occasionally get stuck in certain points but otherwise work fine, I just have to remember not to overfill the hdd's and not be to agressive with PC games.

Also, I'm referring to the external USB ports, not internal usb(?). External Sata ports, not familiar with them, I olny got motherboards with external usb ports.

Whatever you decide to do is up to you. Eventually, though, the OS will continually kick up more BSoD's and make the drive inaccessible.



All my HDDs that work perfectly, have passed the tests that I see required and have had zero smart related issues (Not even a singular ECC recovery or bad sector) had rattled. I can't tell you what it is, but, they all have.

I highly doubt it's the head considering it's not coming from the platter area, it's coming from the top where the air filters & mounting screws are, although, at the time of rattling there were not screws screwed in; another point to mention is that this range is about 6 HDDs.
March 19, 2013 1:24:13 PM

Really? This thread is from 2007.
March 19, 2013 1:38:41 PM

taughannock said:
First off buy a USB enclosure. Take the drive out and put it in the enclosure. It will be easier to deal with data recovery If you don't have to boot that disk. Then I recommend Acronis Disk Director because you can retrieve data from earlier restore points.


This guy exhumed this Question, he started it. I just saw it on the first page of the topic list.
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