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Processing Power and Power Consumption of Conroe-L

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August 23, 2007 2:23:54 PM

Ok, just out of curiousity, with the recent energy efficient computing (and believe me, I'm on the bandwagon), why has no one compared the Conroe-L (Celeron 4xx series) single-core processor to its dual-core counterparts in terms of processing power and power consumption as well as to its older single-core equivalents (Pentium 4/Sempron/Athlon)?

If anyone knows of how they compare, or has seen any reviews let me know. I believe these [seemingly] efficient processors are more than enough power for the average email/surfing/word-ing user. Let me know your thoughts on the subject.
August 23, 2007 2:55:09 PM

I've wondered about this too. I've been thinking about upgrading my laptop for the last year or two, and I've wondered about the power requirements of a dual-core vs a single-core, since I don't play games or render video files on a laptop, I wouldn't need the extra core and would love to get a little extra battery life.

I haven't seen any benchmarks, but I suspect that it doesn't make a lot of difference, although I'd appreciate it if someone had some better information.
August 23, 2007 9:51:26 PM

Anyone else have thoughts on this topic, or is everyone ignoring it because it conserns 'inadequate' single-core procs?
Related resources
August 24, 2007 12:41:45 AM

http://www.matbe.com/articles/lire/385/core-se-decline-...

In terms of power consumption, the lack of EIST hurts the Conroe-Ls at idle. At full load, it's very thrifty. Probably less than 20W. I would probably spend the extra bucks for the E2140 which has EIST and still has very good power consumption.
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August 24, 2007 12:59:33 AM

KyleSTL said:
Anyone else have thoughts on this topic, or is everyone ignoring it because it conserns 'inadequate' single-core procs?


Ultimately it depends on what the consumer wants the PC to do.

I built my HTPC a few years ago. I wanted it to be quiet and to consume very little power because all it is being used for was to record TV programs, play video and music. I built it around the Athlon XP-M 2600+ which allowed me to select the clock multiplier. I installed it in to a BioStar that allowed me to undervolt the CPU (which was nice).

However, it is showing it's age and I intend on using the parts from my current PC to build a new HTPC. I will upgrade to Penryn, but not sure if I will go Quad Core or not. Having a C2D E6600 in an HTPC may be going overboard, but I intend on playing back Blu-Ray movies and more importantly, encode video using the H.264 codec which is very demanding on the CPU.

Technology drives demand, and my demand will be high. However, I do not intend on overclocking my E6600 so that I can cool it passively. It is interesting to note that my next HTPC will likely cost more than a replacement primary PC since I plan on installing 4 1TB drives in it (RAID 1) to store all my H.264 videos and FLAC music (I hate MP3s).
August 24, 2007 6:38:59 AM

accord99 said:
http://www.matbe.com/articles/lire/385/core-se-decline-...

In terms of power consumption, the lack of EIST hurts the Conroe-Ls at idle. At full load, it's very thrifty. Probably less than 20W. I would probably spend the extra bucks for the E2140 which has EIST and still has very good power consumption.



Wow. What a trippy power consumption benchmark. Celeron 420 goes from 75 watts idle to 79 watts under full CPU load. Weird.

Thanks for the link btw, very cool!
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